Roasted Butternut Squash & Sausage with Gluten-Free Penne Pasta

Roasted Butternut Squash and Sausage with Gluten Free Penne Pasta - close up

Butternut squash, also known as butternut pumpkin or gramma, has a sweet, nutty taste similar to that of a pumpkin.

When ripe, it turns increasingly deep orange, and becomes sweeter and richer.

Roasted butternut squash has a creamy sweet buttery taste.

It is a good source of fiber, vitamins A & C and including magnesium and potassium.

Sage is a pungent herb. It has been added to the recipe as it gives a feeling of warmth to the dish. It has an earthy taste, combining the scents and flavors of citrus and pine.

Fresh sage is more vibrant and less bitter than when it is dried.

Roasted Butternut Squash & Sausage with Gluten-Free Penne Pasta

4 tbsp. olive oil

1 package chicken sausage

3 cups gluten-free, Penne pasta

2 cups cubed, butternut squash

1 tbsp. dark brown sugar

½ cup pecan pieces

1 stick, salted butter

8 sage leaves, small

½ tsp. Himalayan Salt

½ tsp. black pepper

Slide a small baking sheet into your oven and preheat it to 400 degrees.

Cook gluten-free pasta according to package instructions.

preparing butternut sqaush for Roasted Butternut Squash and Sausage with Gluten Free Penne PastaPeel and cube up two cups of butternut squash.

In a medium bowl, toss the squash with olive oil, salt, pepper and dark brown sugar.

Remove heated aluminum lined baking sheet from oven, add the squash and spread out over aluminum sheet.

Return to oven and roast for 20-25 minutes, stirring vegetables once 1/2 through.

Remove once the squash is tender.

searing chicken sausage for Roasted Butternut Squash and Sausage with Gluten Free Penne PastaIn a large medium heated skillet, add olive oil and sear the chicken sausages on all sides.

Remove, slice and add back to the pan to cook the centers.

In a large mixing bowl, combine sausage, pasta and butternut squash, and set aside.

A 39 second video to show You how to prepare the “Brown Butter Sage Sauce”

Heat a 10 inch skillet on medium heat.

Place the stick of cold butter into the hot pan, lift and swirl the butter.

Add in the sage leaves and keep swirling until the butter has completely melted, should be a deep brown color, but not to the point of burning.

adding pecan pieces to Roasted Butternut Squash and Sausage with Gluten Free Penne Pasta

After you have poured the brown butter sage sauce over the pasta, toss to mix well.

Sprinkle pecan pieces over top and mix in.

Roasted Butternut Squash and Sausage with Gluten Free Penne Pasta - close upPlate and serve.

Another Gluten-free Recipe: Gluten Free Rigate with Roasted Butternut Squash and Smoked Bacon

More Recipes with Butternut Squash

Roasted Butternut Squash with Apples Cranberries and Candied Walnuts

Coconut and Butternut Squash Soup

What Others are Saying About Butternut Squash and Glut-Free Products:

Have You Tried Butternut Squash Yet – with recipes

Have You Tried Butternut Squash Yet - with recipes

Butternut squash might just be one of Autumn’s most versatile fruits, yes fruit.

It is one of the most popular squashes with a mild, but sweet flavor and smooth-textured flesh.

There are so many delicious ways to use this hard-shell squash, from soups and salads to lasagna and pizza.



Fruit or Vegetable

Technically, butternut squash is a fruit as its seeds are inside the squash.

This is true of all members of the gourd family, which includes winter squash, pumpkins, cucumbers, and melons.

A Prebiotic Food

Butternut squash is high in fiber and is a prebiotic food that supports healthy bacteria in the digestive tract.

A prebiotic food is not to be confused with a probiotic food.

Gluten Free Rigate with Roasted Butternut Squash and Smoked Bacon

Prebiotic was first brought to light by scientists in 1995, and described as “a non-digestible food ingredient that beneficially affects the host (human being) by selectively stimulating the growth and/or activity of one or a limited number of bacteria in the colon, and thus improves host (human) health”.

Prebiotics foods are fermented by the beneficial bacteria in the gut and used as a source of fuel to help enhance gut flora health.

Other prebiotic foods include asparagus, leeks, garlic, onions, dandelion greens, bananas, apples, Jerusalem artichoke, jicama root, radishes, chicory, and cabbage among many other foods.

Roasted Turkey Sausage with Apples and Butternut Squash

Nutritional Profile of Butternut Squash

One cup of cubed, raw butternut squash typically has 63 calories, 1.4g of protein, 0.1g of fat, 16.4g of carbohydrates, 2.8g of fiber, and 3.1g of sugar.

Butternut squash packs plenty of vitamins A and C, and including Calcium – Magnesium – Phosphorus – Potassium – Zinc – Copper and Manganese.

All these minerals and vitamins are needed to maintain healthy skin, hair and eyes.

Its potassium content helps maintain a healthy blood pressure.

Roasted Brussels Sprouts and Cinnamon Butternut Squash with Pecans and Cranberries

Selecting Your Squash

Look for squash with minimal bruising and no obvious cuts or oozy areas. The squash should feel heavy for its size.

During the Autumn months, squash can sometimes be found at farm stands, farmers’ markets, or “U-Pick” pumpkin and gourd farms.

Purchasing at these locations can help you get a squash with maximum flavor.

Roasted Butternut Squash and Sausage with Gluten Free Penne Pasta

Storing Your Squash

If you plan on eating the squash soon, you can keep it on your countertop for up to a week.

For longer storage, keep it in a cool, dark place such as a cold storage room. A properly stored squash can last for weeks or even months.

Diced raw butternut squash can be refrigerated for two to three days.

Once cooked, the squash will keep in the fridge for up to 5 days.

In conclusion, to enjoy butternut squash, cook it by roasting, baking or microwaving the squash, then enjoy as a side dish. Try one or more of the butternut squash recipes featured in this article.

Roasted Brussels Sprouts and Cinnamon Butternut Squash with Pecans and Cranberries

If you don’t like Brussels sprout you’ll love them in this recipe.

Roasted Brussels sprouts taste great when combined with classic Autumn flavors.

Butternut squash with cinnamon and real maple syrup provides a nice, sweeter contrast to the Brussels sprouts.

Oh, and there’s that bit of crunch from the toasted pecans and more sweetness from dried cranberries.

With all of that flavor in a mouth full of this deliciousness , you won’t even notice the Brussels sprouts.

Roasted Brussels Sprouts and Cinnamon Butternut Squash with Pecans and Cranberries

Roasted Brussels sprouts

3 cups Brussels sprouts ends trimmed, yellow leaves removed

3 tablespoons olive oil

¼ teaspoon Salt to taste

Roasted Butternut Squash:

4 cups (1 1/2 pound squash) butternut squash peeled, seeded, and cubed into 1-inch cubes.

2 tablespoons olive oil

3 tablespoons maple syrup

½ teaspoon ground cinnamon

Additional Ingredients

2 cups pecan halves

1 cup dried cranberries

2-4 tablespoons maple syrup optional

Roasting Brussels sprouts

Preheat oven to 400 F.  Lightly grease the foil-lined baking sheet with 1 tablespoon of olive oil.

Trim ends of Brussels sprouts  and remove yellow leaves. 

Then, slice all Brussels sprouts in half. 

In a medium bowl, combine halved Brussels sprouts, 2 tablespoons of olive oil, salt to taste, and toss to combine.

Place onto a foil-lined baking sheet, cut side down, and roast in the oven at 400 F for about 20-25 minutes.

During the last 5-10 minutes of roasting, turn them over for even browning, the cut sides should be nicely and partially charred but not blackened.

Roasting Butternut Squash

Preheat oven to 400 F. Lightly grease the foil-lined baking sheet with 1 tablespoon of olive oil.

In a medium bowl, combine cubed butternut squash, 1 tablespoon of olive oil, maple syrup, and cinnamon, and toss to mix.

Place butternut squash in a single layer on the baking sheet. Bake for 20-25 minutes, turning once half-way through baking, until softened.

Roast both Brussels sprouts and butternut squash on 2 separate baking sheets at the same time, on the same rack in the oven.

Toasting The Pecans

Toasting pecans in the oven, stove, or microwave will intensify their flavor and make them extra crunchy.

If you are toasting the nuts without additional flavorings (as the case with this recipe) over toasting them (usually beyond 7 minutes) will burn out all the flavor and turn them black.

Toast pecans in the preheated oven at 350 F

Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

Toast the pecans for about 5 – 7 minutes in the preheated oven at 350 F until they get darker in color.

Pecans can burn really fast, so make sure to check the nuts after 5 minutes and frequently afterwords.

Bringing It All Together

In a large bowl, combine roasted Brussels sprouts, roasted butternut squash, pecans, and cranberries, and mix to combine.

For extra sweetness, add 2 or 4 tablespoons of maple syrup. Start with a tablespoon at a time mixing in. Add more, if desired, and toss with the salad ingredients to combine.

Cooking Simple With Your Family

Collage of adults cooking with their children - Cooking Simple With Your FamilyWe have been interviewing Keisha T. Prosser – The Mobile Cooking Teacher on Using Your Cooking Skills To Teach Others About Good Nutrition (March. 15, 2016) and  The Mobile Cooking Teacher – Inspiring A New Generation Of Cooks (March. 19, 2019). To see the interviews again just click and follow the above links.

Keisha T. ProsserSplendid Recipes: Today we are going to let Keisha explain the right time to start teaching your children cooking skills. Okay Keisha, we pass the platform over to you.

Keisha: Thanks Randy. Do you have children? Have you ever thought when would be a good time to start teaching my child how to cook? But not only cook, but cook healthy meals.

It is true we are all busy, but our children will not always be with us, and they need to know the importance of COOKING. And it doesn’t matter if they are a girl or boy, we all should have some basic cooking skills.

Okay, so when is a good time to start teaching your children? Let’s talk about age groups and what are some skills they can learn during those ages.

Teaching Children Age Appropriate Cooking Skills

Here are the age appropriate cooking skills to teach your children.

Preschoolers – 6 years old

young boy learning to cut with a knife - Cooking Simple With Your FamilyThis age group can help preparing fruit and pasta salads, help with setting the table, and for those who can read, they can read the recipe ingredients and directions with you. Doing so will help them learn to follow recipe directions.

They can measure ingredients, learn how to use a food timer, including a meat thermometer. They can help with making smoothies by allowing the child to place the ingredients into the blender.

This is also a wonderful age group to let help with young girl helping to make cookies - Cooking Simple With Your Familybaking cookies, as they can learn the effort that goes into making one of their favorite snacks.

Explain to them how herbs and spices flavor a recipe. You might think teaching this to a preschooler to 6 year old would be something they wouldn’t understand, which may be true at first. But repetition is key to teaching children the skills of cooking.

Other things this age group can help with in food preparation is preparing breakfast, lunch and dinner, helping with menu planning, as well as helping to clean up the kitchen after eating.

This age group is the right time to start and teach them the importance of eating healthy.

Ages 7-12

young boy learning to cook - Cooking Simple With Your FamilyContinue with what they have learned up to age six, that is measuring ingredients, making smoothies, menu planning, and help with cleaning the kitchen.

Ages 7 to 12 is a good age group to start teaching kitchen prep work, that is cutting up fresh fruits and vegetables, meats, and cheeses that will go into the recipe you are preparing.

Continue with teaching them the importance of healthy eating, flavoring foods with herbs and spices, including following and reading recipe directions.

 

Ages 13-18 

 teen boy preparing a recipe - Cooking Simple With Your FamilyThis age group can start learning to prepare breakfast, lunch and dinner by themselves.

They even make their favorite cookies on their own, including learning how to cook different cuisines, like a simple Asian stir-fry or Mexican food, like tacos.

They still should be encouraged to read and follow recipe directions. At this age let them sit with a paper and pencil and plan out the weeks menu.

Letting them do this will help them learn appreciation for planning ahead to eat, instead of waiting to the last minute when you are really hungry, and may go for some junk food.

Cooking Simple

We all would like meals to be done in 20 minutes or less, at least I do.

young girl cooking - - Cooking Simple With Your FamilyHere are some simple ingredients you can teach your child to mix together to form different recipes in the kitchen.

You can do 3 easy things with these ingredients: Lemon, Garlic, Salt, Sugar, Olive Oil, and Onion.

Salad Dressing: Lemon, Olive Oil, Garlic, Onion, Salt and Lemon Zest.

Marinade: Lemon, Garlic, Onion and Olive Oil

The ideas are endless with these simple ingredients.

Having your family helping in the kitchen more is one way to make sure everyone is eating more fresh fruits and vegetables.

Preparing meals together brings you closer as a family. You are teaching your family how to cook healthier and smarter.

Remember, the heart of the home is in the kitchen, and a healthy kitchen, is a healthy heart.

Splendid Recipes: Thanks so much Keisha, for taking the time out to share all that you have with us on teaching good nutrition through cooking, inspiring future cooks, and cooking together as a family.

Keisha: No thank you Randy for this opportunity. And I appreciate any one who would like to follow me on any one of the social net works I am on.

Splendid Recipes: Yes follow Keisha on any one of the following social net works and keep up with the latest adventures of – The Mobile Cooking Teacher.

What Others Are Reading:

Leafy Green Salads With Homemade Cheese

Leafy Green Salads With Homemade CheeseThrowing some leafy greens with other vegetables together on a plate and topping it with some nuts, seeds and your favorite dressing or vinaigrette is a great way to get your daily servings of vegetables.

How about going a step further and adding some cheese, like Parmesan, grumbled goat cheese, or even some of your own homemade cheese made in an hour? What? Yes you read right, homemade cheese made in one hour.

One Hour Cheese by Claudia LuceroWe were listening to NPR this past week, and the program was All Things Considered, and I was very intrigued at hearing that you could make cheese in one hour.

Listen here to the 3 minute interview with Claudia Lucero who runs Urban Cheesecraft in Portland, Oregon, and authored the book “One Hour Cheese” (CLICK HERE TO HEAR INTERVIEW). 

After listening in the car to the interview with Claudia, the very next day with a gallon of milk from Whole Foods Market, I ventured to make some homemade cheese in my own kitchen for the first time.

Here’s what you need to do to make your own cheese in an hour….

Pour 4 cups milk into a 2-quart saucepan and heat it on medium as you stir.

Look for foam to begin forming around the inside edges of the pot as well as little simmer bubbles coming from the bottom—not a rolling boil. Stir continuously so that a skin doesn’t form on the milk’s surface.

Once you see a soft boiling of the milk, slowly add 1/8 cup of fresh lemon juice. You can also use vinegar. Apple cider or white vinegar will do.

As you are slowly pouring in the lemon juice, stir gently to incorporate it until you see the clear separation of curds, which will be white solids, and whey, a clear liquid.

This separation of curds from the whey is called coagulation.  When you see coagulation and the liquid no longer looks like plain milk, turn the heat to low and stir the curds very, very gently as you cook them for 2 minutes more after the coagulation begins.

Have a cheese cloth placed in a small strainer over a bowl, and using a slotted spoon, carefully spoon out the curds and place them into the cheese cloth, and let any excess whey drain off.

After the whey has drained off, you can add some sea salt or Himalayan salt to the cheese and mix in.

We add some garlic seasoning, which gave it a great flavor. In Claudia Lucero’s book, she even shows you how to make a faux cheddar cheese (which takes days to make) in an hour by just adding turmeric to give it that orange look that you see when purchased at the market.

Here is what we got at our first try making homemade cheese.

making homemade cheese

The cheese is much like a crumbled cheese you would buy at the market. Here are a few leafy green salads we put together using our homemade cheese.

Leafy Green Salad With Homemade Cheese

               Leafy Green Salad With Homemade Cheese

This salad is a few handfuls of leafy greens (your choice) topped with sliced radishes, pecan pieces, pomegranate vinaigrette, and homemade crumbled cheese.

making a leafy green salad with root vegetables and homemade cheese

Our next salad is a plate of leafy greens, with a fried egg and some root vegetables, consisting of sliced radishes and golden beets. We topped the salad with a olive oil and sweet balsamic vinaigrette, homemade crumbled cheese and fresh thyme.

Leafy Greens With Root Vegetables and A Fried Egg And Homemade Cheese

Leafy Greens With Root Vegetables and A Fried Egg And Homemade Cheese

As we mentioned at the on set of the article, this is a great way to get a few servings of your daily need of vegetables, and a added treat you make yourself, Homemade Cheese.

What Others Are Reading:

Roasted Butternut Squash with Apples Cranberries and Candied Walnuts

Roasted Butternut Squash with Apples Cranberries and Candied Walnuts in a serving bowl Here is a great dish that we believe you don’t have to wait until the Autumn months to enjoy. Cranberries are harvested September thru November, and are found fresh in the stores in the months of November and December. Cranberries are always associated with Thanksgiving and Christmas dinners.

Cranberries freeze well for up to one year, so why not buy yourself a few extra bags to enjoy them other parts of the year.

Did you know that in January the packaged cranberries that have not sold are reduced in price, which has been from 98 cents to around $1.25 around the past few years. The bags that do not sell, the markets store away in their freezers until next year.

Continued Downfall of the Bee Only Intensifies MalnutritionCranberries are another food crop that depend on bees for pollination. The fruit is a berry, and it is larger than the leaves of the plant.

Once the berry starts to form, it is initially white, turning a deep red when fully ripe. The berry has an acidic taste that can overwhelm its sweetness.

—Read More About Our Declining Pollinator Population: Continued Downfall of the Bee Only Intensifies Malnutrition —

Cranberries are related to bilberries, blueberries, and huckleberries.

Cranberry Field harvestA common misconception about cranberry production is that the beds remain flooded throughout the year, but rather the beds are irrigated regularly to maintain soil moisture during the growing season.

Beds are flooded in the autumn to facilitate harvest and again during the winter to protect against low temperatures.

Our feature recipe is an example of how you can enjoy those cranberries throughout the year, and here is what you will need to enjoy the flavors of – Roasted Butternut Squash with Apples Cranberries and Candied Walnuts.

1 large butternut squash, peeled and diced into 1-inch cubes

2 large cooking apples, peeled, seeded and diced into 1/2-inch cubes

3/4 cup fresh or frozen cranberries

1/2 cup brown sugar, can use coconut sugar

1/4 cup butter, melted

1 tablespoon gluten-free flour

1 teaspoon Himalayan salt

1 teaspoon 5-star Chinese spice

1/2 cup candied walnut pieces

Preheat oven to 350 degrees

three images of diced fruitsIn a large bowl mix in prepared fruits (yes butternut squash is actually a fruit). Next mix in spice mix and butter, mix in until well coated.

sweet spice mix for Roasted Butternut Squash with Apples Cranberries and Candied WalnutsIn a small bowl, mix together the flour, brown sugar, salt, and spice.

Roasted Butternut Squash with Apples Cranberries and Candied Walnuts ready to roastSpoon coated fruit mix into a 13 X 9 inch baking glass pan.

Roast 50-60 minutes for a tender dish, and for or a lighter crunchy bit, roast for 30 minutes. Test the squash to feel its crunchiness by forking the squash and eating it, and if the squash has a slight firm texture but not mushy, then it’s done roasting.candied walnutsWe found these candied walnuts in the Whole Foods Market. The are walnut halves, which we broke up into pieces.

Roasted Butternut Squash with Apples Cranberries and Candied Walnuts in a serving bowlSpoon the roasted fruit into a serving bowl and top with candied walnuts. Before serving, mix walnuts in. You also have the option to serve the side dish with the walnuts on the side, allowing your family and guests to spoon on the walnuts if they wish.

What Others Are Reading:

Gluten-Free Penne with Smoked Bacon and Butternut Squash

Gluten Free Penne with Roasted Butternut Squash and Smoked Bacon

Butternut squash and also refereed to butternut pumpkin in Australia and New Zealand, is a winter squash. It has a sweet, nutty taste similar to pumpkin.

Butternut_squash

The value of the nutrient content increases when cooked

According to Specialty Produce the butternut squash was developed in Stow, Massachusetts in 1940 by Charles A. Leggette.

The squash is a member of the gourd family and is the most widely grown winter squash. In the United States, Florida is the largest squash-producer with California ranking second.

Butternut is rich in fiber, and low in calories. It also is a good source of minerals, including magnesium and potassium. Those who have asthma or breathing problems, this squash can help, because of its magnesium, and vitamins A and C content.

Medical studies since 1994 have reported that low magnesium intake is linked to asthma and chronic obstructive airways. Many studies also have noted that drugs used in the treatment of asthma causes loss of magnesium in the body (The Link Between An Asthma Attack and Magnesium).

Dr. Carolyn Dean, MD, who authored the book, “The Magnesium Miracle,” states that magnesium has a calming effect on the muscles of the bronchial airways, as well as the whole body (Treating Asthma With Nutrition).

Let’s breath easier, and get that all over calming effect as we present our featured recipe: Gluten Free Penne with Smoked Bacon and Butternut Squash, and here is what you will need.

1 medium butternut squash, peeled, seeded, cut into 1-inch pieces, cooked in a steamer (optional to roast)

1 tablespoon olive oil

1 pound gluten-free penne pasta

1 large yellow onion, diced

1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes

1/2 teaspoon fresh ground pepper corns

1/2 pound smoked bacon, cooked, but not crispy, your preference in flavor, we used a apple-bourbon smoked bacon

1/2 cup Parmesan cheese, grated

Cook pasta according to package instruction. Save one cup of the pasta water before draining pasta. Set aside.

sauteing onions Over medium heat in a large ceramic coated frying pain, add oil and diced onion, red pepper flakes and crushed pepper corns, and saute until onion are slightly browned, about 6 to 7 minutes.

adding squash and pastaNext add past, squash, and bacon. Mix until well incorporated. Next add cheese, and slowly add the reserved pasta water. The amount you add determines if you want the dish creamy or not.

Gluten Free Penne with Roasted Butternut Squash and Smoked BaconPlate and serve.

What Others Are Reading:

Mexican Squash Pasta with Chorizo Meat Sauce

Mexican Squash Pasta with Chorizo Meat Sauce

All squash varieties are members of the Curcurbita family. They come in varying colors, textures, shapes, sizes, and a range of flavors.

The three main categories of the Curcurbita family are:
Curcurbita pepo– include but not limited too zucchini, summer squashes, acorn, and spaghetti squash
Curcurbita maxima– includes but not limited too: banana squash, and pumpkin
Curcurbita moschata– includes but not limited too: butternut squash, and calabaza

Squash is a low carbohydrate food, including a low glycemic index food, between 0 and 35. The low number indicates no spiking of insulin in the blood stream. Most squash have small amounts of vitamins A, C, E and K, and including the B-vitamins. They also contain trace minerals including iron, calcium, magnesium, potassium, zinc, and copper.

Squash is great for heart health and every muscle of the body. Magnesium is great to help the muscles relax, preventing what is called charlie-horse or cramping of the muscles.

As for potassium, one half cup serving of Grey Squash as an example has 603 mg, raw zucchini has 459 mg, cooked has 194 mg, and baked Butternut squash has 289 mg.

Mexican Grey SquashThe squash we are using in our featured recipe is a hybrid of the zucchini squash, and is referred to in Mexico as the Mexican squash or the grey squash.

The grey squash has the same texture and flavor as the zucchini. Unlike the zucchini when harvested at a larger size, the grey squash tends to still have a tender skin.

Now for our featured recipe: Mexican Squash Pasta with Chorizo Meat Sauce. The recipe is simple and easy, as it contains 3 ingredients as follows…

principle ingredients for Mexican Squash Pasta with Chorizo Meat SauceYou can use any type of spaghetti sauce, but we chose to use a tomato base with cream and vodka included, 2 cups.

One pound of organic pork chorizo, which we purchased on sale at the Whole Foods Market, and 3 Mexican squash, which will make about 2 to 3 servings. Here we have a larger harvested Mexican squash given to us from a friends organic home garden.

makng squash pasta with a julienne peelerUsing a julienne peeler, run it from top to bottom all around the squash until you arrive to the seeds in the center. Set the squash pasta aside.

Pork ChorizoHeat a large ceramic coated skillet over medium heat, add a tablespoon of pastured unsalted butter, and when melted add the pork, and cook until done, about 10 minutes. remove from heat, and set aside.

cooking squash pasta in skillet In a large ceramic coated skillet over medium heat, add 4 tablespoons of olive oil. When heated, add the stringed squash and cook for about 5 minutes. You want the oil to cling to the squash strings. If the oil clings then in turn the spaghetti sauce will cling to the squash pasta. Do not over cook the squash, you want a little crunch, and at the same time you want a fork to twirl it, the same as is done with traditional pasta.

sauce and chorizoRemove skillet from heat and transfer squash past to a serving platter. Return the skillet to the heat and add the spaghetti sauce and cooked pork chorizo, and mix together. Allow the heat to warm the meat sauce.

Mexican Squash Pasta with Chorizo Meat Sauce - 2

Remove meat sauce from heat and pour it over the squash pasta arranged on a serving platter. Serve with grated Italian cheese, and enjoy.

What Others Are Read

Gluten-Free Rigate With Roasted Butternut Squash & Smoked Bacon

Gluten Free Rigate with Roasted Butternut Squash and Smoked Bacon

The ultimate comfort food and easy to make pasta dish. With its subtle sweetness, butternut squash is a flavor that will go with almost any main dish.

This buttery and savory dish with hints of herbaceous sage and the subtle sweetness and spice of shallots and cayenne pairs well the smoked applewood bacon.

Gluten-Free Rigate With Roasted Butternut Squash & Smoked Bacon

2 cups butternut squash (about a 1 3/4 pound squash), peeled, seeded and cut into 1/2-inch dice

1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil

gluten free penne rigate

12 oz. Penne Rigate, gluten-free pasta

4 to 5 thick sliced applewood smoked bacon, cut into 1/4-inch slices

2 shallots, thinly sliced

12 fresh sage leaves, torn

1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper

black pepper

1/2 cup freshly grated Pecorino cheese, plus more for serving

In a pot of boiling water, cook the gluten free pasta according to package instructions. Drain the pasta and rinse, reserving 1 cup of the pasta water. Most Jovial pasta instructions do not say to rinse, but we do, so the pasta will not stick, while it sits waiting to be used.

roasting butternut squash on the BBQ

Now you can roast the butternut squash coated with olive oil in a preheated 425 degree oven (that’s great for colder weather) or you can do what we did and roast the diced squash coated with olive oil (1 tablespoon) on a hot BBQ grill using a BBQ basket. Just add the squash to the basket and close the lid for about 15 minutes or until the squash is browned and tender (but not to soft or mushy).

roasted butternut squash

When butternut squash is brown and tender, remove and set aside.

adding fresh sage

Heat on the grill remaining 3 tablespoons of olive oil in a large ceramic coated skillet (or skillet of your choice), and add the smoked bacon and cook until lightly browned, about 5 minutes.

Next add the shallots, crushed red pepper and a generous pinch of black pepper and mix in. Next add the sage, mix in and cook until the shallots are soft, about 4 minutes.

a large ceramic coated pan on the BBQ  making Gluten Free Rigate with Roasted Butternut Squash and Smoked Bacon

Next add the squash, rigate, and the reserved cooking water and cook over heat, tossing gently, until the sauce is thickened, about 2 to 3 minutes.

adding Pecorino chesse to Gluten Free Rigate with Roasted Butternut Squash and Smoked Bacon

Next add and mix in the 1/2 cup of Pecorino cheese.

sitting and enjoying Gluten Free Rigate with Roasted Butternut Squash and Smoked Bacon - Topped with some more Pecorino cheese

Plate and serve, passing extra Pecorino cheese at the dinner table, or enjoy out on your back patio during a warm summer evening.

Now try this dish with chicken sausage and gluten-free as well – Roasted Butternut Squash & Sausage with Gluten Free Penne Pasta

Food Parts That Are Still Surprisingly Useful

Food Parts That Are Still Surprisingly Useful

Don’t toss the food scrapes just yet! You can still use them to make or prepare something you may never given any thought too.

Watermelon Rinds

Watermelon rind has nutritional benefits. It contain vitamin-C and vitamin B-6, both great for skin, immunity, and the nervous system. Here’s something that maybe a surprise to you the rinds may help your sex life. A 2008 study at Texas A&M University research reported that watermelon rinds have high concentrations of a compound called citrulline, which the body converts into an amino acid that helps improve circulation and relax blood vessels.

After cutting up a watermelon save those rinds and blend them into a fruit smoothie, or try using them in a stir-fry. The rinds when cooked have a zucchini-like texture, with a slightly sweeter flavor.

Banana Peels

A 2013 study found that around 40 million tons of banana peels are thrown in the trash and go unused worldwide. Did you know you can use the peels to heal wounds, just rub the pulp side on bruises and scrapes to deliver potassium to heal the wound.  Soak the peels in a jar of water, for a few days, then mix five parts water to one part banana-water, and fertilize your potted plants .

The Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology (2011) wrote that banana peels contain carotenoids and polyphenols, which are thought to help prevent diabetes, heart disease, and cancer.

Wash the peel in water then blend into a fruit smoothie. India boasts a dry vegetable curry using chopped banana peels boiled with turmeric powder and salt, then mixed with other ingredients, such as mustard seeds, green chilies, and cabbage.

Sweet Potato Peelings

After peeling a sweet potato, use the peels help lighten those persistent dark circles under the eyes. Even some have used the peels as a remedy to fad away freckles and age spots o the skin. It’s the enzyme called catecholase in the potatoes that give the peelings of the sweet potato this ability.

Stale Bread

Stale bread has always been used to make crumbs or croutons But did you can know you can run stale bread through your spice or coffee grinders to remove any leftover odors or residue?

If you have smudges or marks on the walls, including crayon marks, stale bread can help. First remove the crust, then wipe the marks or smudges with a soft cloth, then rub semi-stale bread against it. The sponge like texture will work like a store bought cleaning eraser.

Onion Skin‘s

The wrapping around onions is rich in the nutrient quercetin, a plant pigment that helps to prevent your arteries from clogging, and helping with lowering blood sugar, and reducing inflammation.

A 2011 study reported that in the European Union alone, around 500,000 tons of onion skins go to waist each year. Though the onion skin is not palatable, you can reap the health benefits by tossing the onion skins into beef, chicken or vegetable broth while cooking soups and stews. The out come will be a rich, flavorful soup. Don’t for get to remove the skin before serving.

Olive Oil

Do you have a bottle of olive oil that has lost its fragrant taste? Will don’t toss it. There are still ways to use it.

Do you have a pair of paints that has a zipper that just won’t budge? Dab some oilve oil on the teeth of the zipper to make it zip again. You can even use it to wipe off eye makeup. Surprised? Just try it and see for yourself.

Other uses include rubbing into the leaves of potted plants to make them shine and look healthier, or even use to polish your leather shoes.

Swiss Chard Stalks

Those of us that use Swiss chard, always toss the stalks, but wait, German researchers reported that the stalks contain glutamine an amino acid , which boosts the immune system, and can also aid the body to recover from surgery and heal wounds.

Cut the stalks into one-inch cubes, roast for about 20 minutes, and season with lemon juice, chopped garlic, salt, and pepper. Add a whole Swiss chard (stalks included) to the blender for a powerful boost to your green juice or smoothie.

If none of the for gone ideas sound appealing to you, you can toss those scrapes into a mulch bend to add to the soil in your garden. Even if you don’t garden, give your scrapes off to a friend who does, or to your local community garden.

 

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