Molcajete Salsa

Molcajete Salsa

A traditional Mexican salsa is made with roasted tomatoes, chilies, garlic and onions.

Rather than using a blender, the roasted ingredients are smashed together in a molcajete or mortar and pestle.

The earthy texture created by the Molcajete is quite distinctive, and due to the seasoning of the Molcajete, it will carry a subtle difference in taste which can’t be duplicated in a blender.



Molcajete salsa has a more smoky flavor and is deliciously yummy to serve with many favorite Mexican dishes.

It’s particularly amazing with grilled meats such as carne asada or this Beef Steak Fajitas.


Read More About Mexican Cuisine – Turning Hard Corn Kernels Into Something Eatable


What is a Molcajete?

A Molcajete is a Mexican mortar hand carved from a single block of basalt volcanic rock by artisans who for generations have kept this Mexican tradition.

The use of the Molcajete dates back several thousand years, and was used by the Aztecs and Mayans.

Making it one of the world’s oldest kitchen tools.

Mexican Woman Using A Molcajete or Mortar & Pestle

Today the Molcajete can be found in the kitchen of just about ever home throughout Mexico.

Seasoning Your Molcajete For First Time Use

Before using the first time, a Molcajete should be “broken into” to make sure that there are no small grains of rock that can become loose when used for the first time.

You do this by grinding a handful of raw rice several times in the bowl of the Molcajete with the tejolete using the rice as an abrasive agent to grind the surface of the bowl smooth. Keep grinding the rice until it becomes grey from the rock “dust”.

Empty the bowl, and keep repeating the process with new rice until the rice no longer turns grey.

Although a laborious process, once done, you will never have to do it again.

Some rice flour will remain ground into the surface of the rock, but this does not create any problems.

As with cast iron skillets, Molcajetes with use become “seasoned”, carrying flavors from one preparation to another.

The more you use your Molcajete, the more seasoned it will become.

You can jump start the process by seasoning the bowl prior to actually preparing your first recipe.

You can do this by grinding several cloves of garlic along with some kosher salt, cumin seeds, and some cilantro sprigs.

Let this paste sit overnight so the Molcajete can absorb the flavors. Wash as above, and you are ready for you first recipe (Source: Ancient Cookware).

Molcajete Salsa

6 small tomatoes (about 1½ lb.), cored, halved

½ small onion, peeled, quartered

3 garlic cloves, peeled

3 small jalapeños, stems removed

Kosher salt

Cook’s Notes

You can either roast the ingredients on a bbq, using a skillet (In Mexico it is called a Comal), on the stovetop, or under the broiler.

Roasting Vegetables On. BBQ For Molcajete Salsa

Heat broiler. Place tomatoes, onion, garlic, and jalapeños in a roasting pan or on a large rimmed baking sheet and broil until charred on top, about 4 minutes.

Remove from broiler and turn vegetables over. Broil until other sides are charred, about 5 minutes. (Watch the garlic carefully and remove earlier if needed.)

Transfer vegetables to a molcajete and mash into a coarse purée. Season salsa with salt.

Enjoy your irresistible Molcajete Salsa that is an iconic part of Oaxacan, Mexican cooking.

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Barbecued Beans & Mexican Chorizo

Barbecued Beans & Mexican Chorizo

The simple flavors of beans are enhanced with Mexican chorizo. Go a step further by adding shallots, sweet peppers and smoked bacon.

Barbecued beans and Mexican chorizo always make a great addition to any lunch, brunch, dinner or even breakfast. Like this Instant Pot Mexican Chorizo & Cheddar Cheese Frittata.

Add the two together in a cooking pot, and you have an awesomely delicious plate of food.


You Love Tacos and you really enjoy the flavor of chorizo – So why not make these Chorizo Potato Tacos

Barbecued Beans & Mexican Chorizo

1/2 of a shallot bulb, chopped

2 mini-sweet peppers (red, yellow or color of choice), seeded, chopped

5 strips smoked bacon, chopped

1 tablespoon butter

1 – 15 ounce can pinto beans, drained, rinsed

1 – 15 ounce can black beans, drained, rinsed

1 cup barbecue sauce, your choice (or find a recipe for a Homemade bbq sauce here)

8 ounce Mexican chorizo

1 tablespoon avocado oil

Over medium-high heat add butter to a medium sauce pan, melt.

Next, add shallots and peppers. Sauté until shallots are fragrant. Next add chopped bacon, sauté for 2 minutes more.

Next add beans and bbq sauce. Stir until all in sauce pan is well incorporated. Set pot aside on back burner on low heat.

In a large skillet over medium-high heat, add avocado oil. When heated, add chorizo and cook for about 6-8 minutes, stirring meat often. Do not cook chorizo hard, just until done, sausage should be cooked but soft.

With a slotted spoon, scoop meat up, allowing any fat to drip off and add to bbq bean mixture. Mix chorizo into beans.

Plate and enjoy with a side salad. Or any of these suggested side dishes.


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Bacon & Black Bean Taquitos

Bacon & Black Bean Taquitos

Taquitos also known as tacos dorados, are a Mexican-American dish consisting of a small, rolled, crisp-fried corn tortilla filled with various ingredients such as shredded chicken, beef, cheese, refried beans and vegetables.

Essentially A Taquito Is A Rolled Taco

Most people associate taquitos with Mexican cuisine. Though two American restaurants in Southern California are often given credit for their roles in the early development of the taquito.

Cielito LindoTheir Website Proclaims,
Follow the smell of taquitos muy auténticos at this LA institution on historic Olvera Street.

Cielito Lindo was founded by Aurora Guerrero in 1934 and located on Olvera Street (also called Little Mexico) in Los Angeles.

Guerrero’s daughter used her taquito recipe in opening chain restaurants in Los Angeles, and soon competitors were selling similar dishes.

El Indio Mexican RestaurantTheir Website Says In Big Green Letters – “We Invented the Taquito. Really!!!”

In San Diego, what would become El Indio Mexican Restaurant began selling taquitos during World War II, when tortilla factory owner Ralph Pesqueria, Sr., was asked by workers at the Consolidated Aircraft Company factory across the street for a portable lunch item.

Pesqueria, who used a recipe developed by his Mexican grandmother, has claimed credit for introducing the word “taquito” for the dish.

Regardless, of who or were the taquito was invented, the dish is extremely popular and can be found at numerous Mexican restaurants, fast food chains and street food venders.


Read More About The Origins Of Mexican Food We Love To Eat In America – Mexican vs. Tex-Mex: What is the Difference?


Bacon & Black Bean Taquitos

Taquitos are traditionally made with corn tortillas.

If you make them with flour tortillas, they would be called “flautas” (Spanish for “flutes”) which is an entirely different recipe or dish.

Bacon & Black Bean Taquitos
Close-Up Of Deliciously Yummy Bacon & Black Bean Taquitos

You will need a vegetable oil with a high smoke point, such as avocado oil.

12 corn tortillas – will plate 3-4 servings

1 cup avocado oil – high smoke point oil

2 15 oz. cans black beans, rinsed, mashed

12 strips smoked bacon

1 cup Oaxaca cheese, crumbled

In a large skillet over medium heat, fry bacon just until crisp. Remove cooked bacon from heat, reserving bacon fat, and set aside.

In the same skillet add rinsed black beans to bacon fat. Mash beans with a potato masher.

You can choose (totally optional) to add 1 teaspoon of garlic and 1/4 cup heavy cream, for creamy garlic flavored mashed black beans. Set aside.

Wrap corn tortillas in a kitchen towel or a slightly damp paper towel and microwave to make them pliable.

Add oil to a deep skillet, about 2-3 inches of oil. Heat on high. The oil should be about 350℉ and should sizzle when you dip a tortilla into it.

Spread 2 tablespoons of mashed black beans over tortilla. Off the center add one strip of bacon and 1-2 teaspoons of crumbled cheese.

Being careful to roll tight, start rolling the tortilla from the side the bacon and cheese were added. Secure with a toothpick.

Fry the taquitos for about 5-7 minutes or until they are start to look browned and crispy (but not burnt). Place them on a paper towel lined surface to soak excess oil.

Plate 3-4 taquitos on a bed of leafy greens. Garnish them with guacamole, crumbled Oaxaca cheese and Mexican crema.*

Click Here For A Homemade Authentic Guacamole

Cooks Notes

* Mexican crema is the Mexican version of French crème fraîche. Both are slightly soured and thickened cream, milder and less thick than American sour cream, with crema being the thinnest.

Easy Recipe For Mexican Crema

1 cup heavy cream

1 tablespoon buttermilk (with active cultures)

Stir together in a small glass jar, both the heavy cream and buttermilk until well combined.

Place lid on jar, tighten and store in fridge until ready to use. Will store for about 5-7 days. Makes 1 cup.


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Authentic Mexican Chilaquiles

Authentic Mexican Chilaquiles

Once you know how to make this Mexican breakfast dish, you’ll never throw away a stale tortilla again.

Chilaquiles turns yesterday’s tortillas into a tasty base for an assortment of possible toppings.

The word chilaquiles (pronunced: chee-lah-kee-lehs) is an ancient word from the Aztec Nahuatl language meaning “chilis and greens.”

The Nahuatl language originated in Central Mexico and can still be heard spoken today in some regional communities.

The tradition of preparing chilaquiles has existed for hundreds of years.

Chilaquiles were first brought to the United States by Encarnatión Pinedo, a Spanish Californian who kept her heritage alive through cooking after her family suffered losses in land and status during the U.S.-Mexico War.

Encarnatión shared her chilaquiles recipe with with others in her cookbook – “The Spanish Cook,” published in 1898.

Chilaquiles can be made with either green, red or white chili sauce.

Authentic Mexican Chilaquiles
Authentic Mexican Chilaquiles Made With Green Chili Sauce

Popular toppings for chilaquiles can include, but not limited too, are Mexican Crema, shredded chicken, cotija cheese, beans, cilantro, avocado, pickled jalapeño, and radish slices.

Authentic Mexican Chilaquiles

1 tablespoon vegetable oil

4 cups tortilla chips (approximately 45 chips from a bag)

1 1/4 cups green or red salsa

1/2 cup crumbled queso fresco or Cotija cheese

2 tablespoons Mexican crema (or substitute regular sour cream thinned with a splash of milk)

Lightly coat a large frying pan with vegetable oil. Heat over medium-high heat until oil shimmers.

Spread tortilla chips in pan.

Quickly pour salsa over chips and reduce heat to medium-low. Simmer the chips in sauce, undisturbed, until chips absorb some of the liquid and soften, for approximately 10 minutes.


Cook’s Notes

Substitute leftover corn tortillas for the packaged chips by cutting them into strips, frying them in 375 F vegetable oil until crisp.

Drain them on paper towels as they cool. Proceed with recipe as with the store-bought chips.


Divide chilaquiles between two plates. Sprinkle some cheese and drizzle with cream.

You could also top with cilantro and guacamole – click here for a deliciously yummy Authentic Guacamole recipe.

Make some authentic Mexican inspired food.


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Authentic Mexican Nachos

Authentic Mexican Nachos

Nachos are a Tex-Mex food with its most basic form consisting merely of fried tortilla chips covered with cheese.

But the toppings don’t stop there as there are a variety of ingredients to top those fried chips.

Besides cheese, nacho toppings also include meats, vegetables and condiments like salsa, sour cream, and guacamole.


Mexican vs. Tex-Mex: What is the Difference?

Read More About Mexican vs. Tex-Mex: What is the Difference?Is There A Difference Or Is It All The Same – Follow Link To Find The Answer


Some versions of nachos are served as an appetizer or snack, while other versions are substantial enough to be a main course.

While corn tortilla chips are a true and authentic snack of Mexican cuisine, the use of them to make nachos came about in the 1940’s.

Nachos were invented by a Mexican executive chef and restaurateur named Ignacio Anaya García, who was also referred to as “Nacho” by his family and friends.

Ignacio Anaya García – a.k.a Nacho – Inventor Of The Popular Snack Or Side Dish – “Nachos”

Tortilla chips, the foundation of nachos, were mass-produced commercially in the U.S. in Los Angeles in the late 1940s.

The chip’s popularity grew and by 1941 in the Victory Club restaurant in Piedras Negras, Coahuila, the dish Nachos was born.

Authentic Mexican Nachos

The History Of Nachos

History writes that one evening after the kitchen staff had left, a group of U.S. Army wives stationed at Fort Duncan in Eagle Pass came into the restaurant (Victory Club). After a long day of shopping, they were hungry and asked for a snack.

Anaya prepared some tostadas cut into triangles. He topped them with shredded cheese and sliced jalapeños and heated the dish in the oven.

They were such a hit with the Army wives that they named the snack “Nacho’s Special.”

The original recipe was printed in the 1954 St. Anne’s Cookbook.

The original recipe consisted of shredded Colby cheese, and sliced pickled jalapeño peppers.

Popularity Of Nachos

As with many culinary foods nachos have made popularity throughout the world.

And with that popularity the toppings used have evolved.

Different variations include BBQ or barbecue nachos, where the cheese is replaced with barbecue sauce. Such as in In Memphis, Tennessee, were they are served in most barbecue restaurants, and also at sporting events.

Irish-themed restaurants and bars serve “Irish Nachos” with toppings placed over French fries instead of tortilla chips.

The Hawaiians even have their version of nachos topped with Kalua pork and pineapple, which are served in many restaurants and bars.

Authentic Mexican Nachos

Nachos with an abundance of toppings are a menu item called “loaded nachos”. This type of dish is usually served as an appetizer at bars and social clubs.

Quick and easy nachos are also sold at concession stands in sports stadiums.

Nachos as we know them today are not really a Mexican food, but rather Tex-Mex.

Authentic Mexican Nachos

This nacho recipe is easily customized. You can choose to start with store-bought ingredients, or make your own chips, refried beans, and toppers, like salsa and guacamole.

The following ingredient amounts are per serving.

3 ounces corn tortilla chips

2/3 cups shredded cheese – Mexican, cheddar or pepper jack

1/4 cup Mexican salsa, store bought or find recipe HERE

1/4 cup guacamole, store bought or find recipe HERE

1/4 cup sour cream

Spread corn chips onto a microwave safe plate. Top with cheeses and place in microwave oven for 3-4 minutes or until cheese is melted.

Remove plate from microwave and continue topping nachos with salsa, guacamole and sour cream. Serve warm.

More authentic Mexican food.


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Authentic Guacamole

Authentic Guacamole

Guacamole is a very common condiment of Mexican cuisine.

Although it is pretty simple to make, it can be tough to get the perfect flavor.

With this authentic Mexican recipe and deliciously yummy, you will be an expert in no time.

Fresh made guacamole is also great because it will always contain fresh, nutritious ingredients, and it only takes about 10 minutes to make!

All you need is:

  • Avocado
  • Cilantro
  • Onion
  • Jalapeno (optional)
  • Garlic powder (optional)
  • Lime Juice
  • Salt
  • Tomato


How To Keep Guacamole From Turning Brown

The most common question that people ask me about guacamole, is how to keep it from turning brown?

There are a few different things you can do to keep your guacamole from browning.

  • Add the pit of the avocado to the finished guacamole
  • Cover with plastic wrap
  • Add an extra teaspoon of lime juice

The later is the most effective. Besides you will be adding citrus juice or lime juice to the guacamole anyway.

Guacamole goes great as a condiment with many dishes. Such as:

Authentic Guacamole

Authentic Guacamole

1 large avocado, seeded and peel removed

1 teaspoon lime juice

1 small tomato, without seeds, chopped

2 garlic gloves, minced

3 tablespoons yellow onion, chopped

1 small Serrano or jalapeño, seeded, vain removed, finely minced

1/4 cup cilantro, finely minced

Mash avocado in a medium sized glass bowl. Add lime juice and mix in.

Next add prepared tomato, garlic, onion, jalapeño and cilantro. Mix in and combined well.

Serve as a condiment with you favorite Mexican dish.


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Authentic Mexican Chile Rellenos

Chiles Rellenos are a Mexican dish made up of green chiles stuffed with cheese or meat, breaded and fried, and served with sauce.

They are a Mexican dish that dates back to the 16th century during the Spanish conquest of Mexico.

The first plated rellenos was prepared in the city of Puebla, a town close to Mexico City.

The dish is emblematic in Mexican cuisine as it has an important significance in Mexican cultural identity because of its historic connection with Mexico’s independence from Spain.

The most common pepper used are poblano peppers which are grown and harvested in the city of Puebla.

Other Chiles used include, New Mexico chile, pasilla peppers or even Anaheim peppers are popular as well.


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Authentic Chile Rellenos

4-6 large poblano peppers, roasted, skin removed, seeded

10 ounces Queso Oaxaca

4 eggs, separated

1 cup avocado oil, high heat use

1/2 cup all purpose flour

Himalayan salt, for seasoning

4 large ripe tomatoes, cored

1/2 white onion

2 garlic cloves, unpeeled

2 serrano peppers

2 teaspoons kosher salt

1 teaspoon dried oregano

1 cup water

2 tablespoons avocado oil, for high heat use

Roasting the Poblanos

Place whole poblano peppers on a parchment paper lined baking sheet in the center of the oven and bake 20-30 minutes, or until skins are blackened, flipping once or twice to achieve even roasting.

Transfer to a heat proof bowl, cover with plastic rap and let cool to room temperature.

Making the Salsa Ranchera

Turn the broiler to high and line a baking sheet with aluminum foil (not recommended to use parchment paper – image shows why 😅).

Roasted Vegetables and Why You Don’t Use Parchment Paper Under the Broiler 😅

Place tomatoes, onion, garlic, and serranos on the baking sheet and place under the broiler.

Check every 2-3 minutes and turn the vegetables so they roast evenly on all sides.

The garlic will cook much faster than the other vegetables. Remove each ingredient as it is done cooking. This should take from 9-15 minutes.

Blend the Salsa Ingredients

Remove the skin from the garlic and the stem and skin from the serranos. If you are sensitive to heat you can also remove the seeds of the serrano peppers too.

Place all the blackened vegetables into a blender along with the 2 teaspoons of salt, the oregano, and the cup of water. Blend on high until smooth.

Fry the Sauce

Heat the 2 tablespoons of oil in a small Dutch oven or heavy bottomed pot over medium-high heat. Add the sauce (careful it will splatter) and fry in the oil until the color deepens and the sauce is fragrant, about 2-3 minutes. Cover and keep warm.

Peel the Peppers

Carefully remove the blackened skin from the peppers. Try your best not to rip or break them. Get off as much as you can and rinse the rest off under running water.

Stuff the Peppers

Cut a slit down the side of each pepper and remove the seeds with your fingers, again being careful not to rip or break them. Rinse out any remaining seeds under running water.

Fill each pepper with 1/2 to 3/4 cup of shredded cheese depending on the size of the pepper—you will use all the cheese.

Place 1-2 fresh epazote leaves inside each pepper if using. Seal closed by threading a toothpick through the opening.

Make the Batter

Beat the egg whites in a bowl of a stand mixer with the whisk attachment on medium-high until they are stiff. Turn the mixer to low and add the yolks one at a time until they are completely incorporated. Add a generous pinch of salt and mix that in as well.

Heat the Oil

Heat the cup of oil in a large frying pan over medium-high heat.

Batter the Chiles

Place flour in a pie plate or shallow baking dish. Season generously with salt. Coat the chiles, one at a time, in the flour, dusting off any excess then dip the chiles into the mixing bowl and cover with the egg batter.

Fry the Chiles

Once the oil is hot add the chiles, one at a time. Adjust the oil temperature as they are cooking. If the oil starts to smoke, turn it down if it becomes too cool, turn up the heat.

Flip the Chiles

Once the chiles are golden brown on one side, flip and cook until golden on that side.

Keep flipping and frying until they are golden all over and they are warmed through, about 5-8 minutes.

Drain the Chiles

Remove to a paper towel-lined baking sheet to drain the excess oil. Repeat with remaining chiles.

Plate chiles top with Salsa Ranchera, chopped cilantro, crumbled queso Oaxaca and serve.

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BBQ Chicken & Roasted Garlic Black Bean Tostadas

A tostada (Spanish meaning Toasted) is the name given to various Mexican dishes and other parts of Latin America.

The tostada, when broken into bite size pieces, can be consumed with a dip, like guacamole or salsa.

Corn tortillas are typically used for tostadas though you can also use flour tortillas.


Learn From A Native Mexican How To Make Flour Tortillas – Read More: Tastes of Mexico with Pico de Gallo and Flour Tortillas


Toppings for tostadas are mostly the same as those used for tacos.

The ingredients include cooked chicken, pork, or beef, and including cheese, sour cream, chopped lettuce, onions, radishes, and salsa.


Try This Peach and Mango Salsa With Your Next Mexican Meal


Tostadas unlike chalupas, enchiladas or tacos, are not folded or rolled, but are kept flat.

There are numerous variations of tostada recipes throughout Mexico and Latin America.

And because the tostada can’t not make a claim to only one traditional tostada recipe, the following is a tostada recipe in addition to several hundred other variations.

BBQ Chicken & Roasted Garlic Black Bean Tostadas

This recipe serves 2 plates – Increase Ingredients Accordingly

Meat and Tortillas

1 large chicken breast, cooked, shredded

1/2 cup BBQ sauce, your favorite

4 corn tortillas

1 cup avocado oil, refined for high heat use


Read More Here About The Smoke Point of Oils


Black beans

1 tablespoon olive oil

1 15 oz. can black beans, drained, rinsed

5 cloves garlic, roasted, minced

1/4 cup heavy cream

1 teaspoon Himalayan salt

Topping For Tostadas

2 green onions, finely chopped

1/4 cup cilantro, finely chopped

4 mini-peppers, roasted, skin removed, deseed, finely chopped

1/2 cup sour cream

Cook large chicken breast and shred, add to a large bowl. Next add bbq sauce and mix well. Set aside.

Next add to a small bowl prepared vegetables and roasted peppers. Add salt to taste, mix well. Set aside.

In a large skillet over medium heat add olive oil and heat.

Next add garlic and sauté for two minutes. Next add drained and rinsed black beans with heavy cream and salt to taste.

Using a potato masher, mash beans with cream and garlic until mix is no loner black but a light brown color. Remove from heat and set aside.

Next add avocado oil to a large sauce pan and heat.

When oil is hot, fry tortillas individually (one at a time) both sides, turning 2-3 times. Set aside on a paper towel lined plate.


Cook’s Notes

Before frying the tortillas, make sure oil is hot. If not hot enough tortillas will soak up oil. The hotter the oil, the less time the tortilla has to be in the oil.


Assembling Tostadas

Divide and spread the refried black beans, shredded bbq chicken, sour cream, and topping (in that order) among the four fried tortillas.

Plate and serve.

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Mexican Chorizo & Egg Tacos

Mexican Chorizo & Egg Tacos

Mexican migrants initially brought tacos to America when they came to find work on railroad construction in the southern states.

In the early 1900s, the Mexican taco carts lined Los Angeles, with the women running them called chili queens.

At the time though, most Americans considered tacos a lower-class street food.

But today, tacos are one of the most universally loved foods, by poor and rich alike.


You Love Chorizo and Tacos – So Why Not Try Our Chorizo Potato Tacos


With the creation of “Taco Bell” in 1962, and the taco already a well-established Mexican food, Taco Bell brought it to the mainstream by building a franchise to sell these tacos countrywide. 

And because of that, authentic Mexican taco street vendors couldn’t keep up with the pace of tacos cooked by Taco Bell and other fast-food joints.

As we often see with fast food, taste and quality are given up in favor of convenience.

If you taste a Taco Bell taco beside one from a Mexican street taco vendor, there’s no flavor comparison.

The same would hold true for a Mexican Chorizo and Egg Taco.

These tacos are Mexican inspired. The chorizo was made in a real Mexican home kitchen.


You Have To Make These Tacos developed in central Mexico that use shawarma spit-grilled meat brought by Lebanese immigrants to Mexico – Tacos al Pastor


Because of the spices added to the preparation of chorizo, there is no need to add other spices.

There’s nothing like homemade Mexican cuisine or food ingredients brought together by Mexican inspiration.

Chorizo & Egg Tacos is an easy dish to prepare.

With just a few key ingredients, these deliciously yummy tacos are like all of the other Mexican dishes that we have come to know and love.

Mexican Chorizo & Egg Tacos

Mexican Chorizo & Egg Tacos

The following ingredients come together to make 2 tacos each for 4 persons. Adjust recipe accordingly.

16 ounces Mexican chorizo

1/2 cup cilantro, chopped

1/2 cup sour cream

8 corn tortillas

1/2 to 3/4 cup olive oil

Heat a medium non-stick skillet over medium heat. Add sausage. Cook, stirring and breaking up meat into small pieces with wooden spoon, until meat is cooked through. Using slotted spoon, transfer meat to a bowl. Set aside.

Warm tortillas by heating each in a small, dry skillet over medium-high heat for about 15 seconds per side, or by microwaving 10 seconds.

To add some flavor, you can opt. to fry them in olive oil for about 2 minutes, turning 2-3 times.

Cook eggs accordingly. Scramble eggs soft and mix in meat. Or fry eggs sunny side up with a soft runny yoke.

Assemble tacos by placing fried egg on tortilla, topped with meat, sour cream and cilantro. Or top tortilla with scrambled egg mixture, sour cream and cilantro.

Plate two tacos per serving and enjoy.


More Chorizo Recipes To Try –


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The Real Breakfast Burrito

The Real Breakfast Burrito

The breakfast burrito was invented in 1975 in the southwestern state New Mexico (USA).

In New Mexico it has long been popular to eat your morning eggs and bacon alongside a flour tortilla.

About The Breakfast Burrito

The popularity of burritos in the U.S. first took hold in Southern California around the 1950’s.

The idea of the “breakfast burrito” was first coined in a restaurant in Santa Fe, N.M.

Lower Right Photo: Nick Maryol, owner of Tia Sophias

The restaurant, Tia Sophia’s make the claim to have been the first to put the words “breakfast burrito” on its menu in 1975 (Source).

How To Make A Real Breakfast Burrito

The breakfast burrito or the breakfast wrap is typically composed of breakfast items wrapped inside a flour tortilla.

The breakfast items can include any combination but not limited too are: eggs, potatoes, cheese, salsa, onions, refried beans, sour cream, peppers such as Jalapeños or Serrano chilies among many others, and including meats like bacon or chorizo.


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The tortilla is lightly grilled or steamed to soften it, making it more pliable, and allowing it to adhere to itself.

After warning the tortilla remove it from the heat and place it on a plate.

Once the tortilla is warmed and placed on the plate, start to spoon in the middle of the tortilla the breakfast ingredients you want.

Need some ideas? Try one or all of the following.

Eggs Peppers & Smoked Bacon Breakfast Burrito

Place a tortilla onto a heat proof skillet and add to the middle of the tortilla a handful of Monterey Jack Cheese.

Next place the skillet under the broiler until cheese is melted. Remove from heat and place tortilla onto a plate.

Add two slices of crisp cooked smoked bacon over melted cheese.

Next add two scrambled eggs with 2 chopped mini-sweet peppers.

Wrap into a burrito and enjoy.

Shredded BBQ Chicken & Jack Cheese Breakfast Burrito

Place a tortilla onto a heat proof skillet.

Next add 1 cup of cooked minced chicken meat (breast, thigh, leg your choice) spooned down the middle section of tortilla.

Next add one whole sautéed green onion over meat. Spoon 3 or 4 tablespoons of your favorite bbq sauce over meat and onion.

Next sprinkle a handful of Jack Cheese over bbq sauce and place skillet under broiler until cheese melts.

About 2 minutes on high broiler or 3-4 minutes on low broiler.

Remove from broiler and place tortilla with heated toppings onto a dinner plate.

Wrap into a burrito and enjoy.

Bean and Cheese Breakfast Burrito with Root Vegetables

Spread 3-4 tablespoons of cooked refried pinto beans and 3/4 cup cheese. Could be Monterey Jack, Pepper Jack, and Sharp Cheddar among others.


Deciding on what cheese to use for your breakfast burritoTop Nine Varieties Of Cheese’s Enjoyed By Food Lovers


Place the tortilla in a heat proof skillet and put under a high heat broiler. Leave there for 1-2 minutes or until cheese melts, but not overly toasted.

Remove skillet from broiler and place on stove top.

Next spoon over top of melted cheese 1/4 cup chopped sautéd cherry tomatoes and 1 green onion diced. Add 1/2 cup of some root vegetables shredded (your choice).

With this burrito we used shredded daikon radish and purple carrot.

Next add 2-3 scrambled eggs over vegetable mix.

Wrap into a burrito and enjoy.