West African Peanut Sweet Potato Stew

West African Peanut Sweet Potato Stew

Peanuts are the star of this hearty plant-based stew that’s inspired by the cuisine of West Africa.

Peanut stew, also called maafe or domodah, is an original dish of the Mandinka and Bambara people of Mali.

Peanut stew has different variations in cuisines of both Western and Central Africa.

Traditional, authentic meats that you can add to African peanut stew include lamb, chicken, beef, fish and even occasionally hard-boiled eggs.

Bambar – African Trible Food

Most of the Bambara are farmers. Their main crop is millet, even though sorghum and groundnuts are produced in large quantities.

Maize, cassava, tobacco, and numerous other vegetables are grown in private gardens as well.

Dew to drought in recent years and other ecological programs have hurt the farmers.

The Bambara farmers also raise cattle, horses, goats, sheep, and chickens.


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West African Peanut Sweet Potato Stew

1 can (28 ounces) diced tomatoes, undrained

1 cup fresh cilantro leaves

1/2 cup chunky peanut butter

3 garlic cloves, halved

2 teaspoons ground cumin

1 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/4 teaspoon smoked paprika

3 pounds sweet potatoes (about 6 medium), peeled and cut into 1-inch pieces

1 can (15 ounces) garbanzo beans or chickpeas, rinsed and drained

1 cup water

8 cups chopped fresh kale

Chopped peanuts and cilantro leaves for garnishing

Place the first 8 ingredients in a food processor; process until pureed. Transfer to the insert of the Instant Pot, stir in sweet potatoes, beans and water.

Place lid over Instant Pot lock in place and close pressure release seal.

West African Peanut Sweet Potato Stew in an Instant Pot

Set to custom pressure cook on high for 30 minutes. After 30 minutes, let pressure release naturally for 10 minutes.

Release pressure, open lid and stir in kale. Replace lid (but do not close and seal) and let sit for 10 minutes or until kale has wilted soft.

West African Peanut Sweet Potato Stew

Ladle into a soup bowl and top each serving with chopped peanuts and cilantro.


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Instant Pot Filipino Style Pork Adobo

Instant Pot Filipino Style Pork Adobo

The world over, people love adobo. In Puerto Rico, Mexico, and the Philippines, adobo is essential and multipurpose. But what is adobo, exactly?

Considered by many to be the national dish of the Philippines, adobo is a traditional Filipino dish of pork (can also use chicken) that’s marinated in vinegar, garlic, soy sauce, bay leaves and peppercorns.


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The term adobo is derived from the Spanish word adobar, meaning marinade.

The practice of marinating meat in a flavorful mixture was common to Spanish cuisine.

With Filipino cuisine, anything can become adobo, like squid, eggplant or mushrooms.


Read More Here AboutWhat Are The Benefits of Marinating Meat


Culinary Facts About Adobo

In Filipino cuisine, adobo refers to a common cooking process indigenous to the Philippines.

Spanish colonists gave the name “adobo” to the cooking method, but the practice of marinating meat in vinegar was a common culinary practice among the indigenous people of the Philippines long before the Spaniards arrival in 1514.

Unlike the Spanish adobo, the main ingredients of Philippine adobo are ingredients native to Southeast Asia, namely vinegar, soy sauce or fish sauce, black peppercorns and bay leaves. It does not traditionally use chilis, paprika, oregano, or tomatoes.

Filipino adobos similarity to Spanish adobo is the primary use of vinegar and garlic.

Instant Pot Filipino Style Pork Adobo

1 1/2 pounds Pork, boneless, cut into 1 1/2 inch chunks, can use pork belly, pork butt, or pork loin

¼ cup dark soy sauce

1 1/2 tablespoons tomato ketchup

1/2 tablespoon black whole peppercorns

1 1/2 teaspoons brown sugar

1/2 teaspoon powdered cayenne pepper

2 bay leaves

5 garlic cloves, minced

For Cooking the Pork Adobo

¼ cup cider vinegar


4 garlic cloves, paper removed, slightly smashed

3 tablespoons avocado oil

Liquid

½ cup water

Marinating The Pork Adobe

Add the pork chunks in a clean dry bowl along with everything mentioned in the “For marinating the pork” section above in the ingredients list.

Mix well so that the pork pieces are well coated with the marinade. Break the Bay leaves into pieces and mix well with the marinated pork.

You can leave the marinated pork overnight in the fridge for best flavors or marinate it for a minimum of 1 hour.

Cooking The Pork

Set the Instant Pot on SAUTE function and set it on HIGH.

Add oil. When moderately hot gently add the marinated pork, without liquid marinade (reserved).

Sear pork pieces just until browned around the edges. Scrape the sides and the bottom of the Instant pot metal insert continuously while searing meat.

When pork is well seared add ½ cup water, cider vinegar and reserved marinade. De-glaze instant pot insert with a spatula.

This is very important to avoid the BURN sign of the Instant Pot.

Add smash garlic cloves and mix in.

CANCEL the SAUTE function. Close the lid of the Instant Pot and SEAL the valve. PRESSURE COOK on HIGH for 10 minutes.

Natural Pressure Release for 10 minutes than release rest of pressure manually by moving valve from the SEALING to the VENTING position. Carefully open the lid of the pot.

Instant Pot Filipino Style Pork Adobo

Serve over rice garnished with chopped green onions and sesame seeds.


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Yielding An Abundant Tomato Crop With These Gardening Tips

tomato cluster ripening on vine - Yielding An Abundant Tomato Crop With These Gardening Tips If you want to grow the healthiest and most delicious tomatoes you possibly can this gardening season, take some pointers from the pros. There are a few very easy ways to implement, and therefore consistently grow a rich harvest of tasty, lush, mouthwatering tomatoes.

Why not try out the following organic gardening tips and see for yourself the biggest and healthiest yield your tomato plants can give you.

Organic Gardening Tips For Growing Succulent Tomatoes

Tip #1

Whether growing in containers or in the ground, make sure you select a location that will give your plants 6 to 8 hours of natural sunlight.  Also, make sure you have enough room between your tomato plants to not only provide for adequate air circulation, but it also assures adequate room for the plants to grow not only upwards, but for extending their stems.

Tip #2

illistration of transplanting a tomato plant

Illustration by Hyperion Yard

If you are buying plants to transplant, make sure you plant deep for the best possible results.

Burying the stem of a tomato allows the plant to sprout new roots which will help improve strength and vitality of the plant.

This also provides better absorption of the nutrients your tomato plants need to grow faster and healthier.

To do this, remove the bottom sets of leaves and bury the stem up to just below the bottom of the remaining leaves.

Experimenting with the above description for transplanting tomato plants to the first true leaf, when compared to just covering the root ball has shown to increase tomato yields by 18% and up to 26% percent for every 25 pounds of fruit at first harvest, according to Dr. Charles Vavrina at the Southwest Florida Research & Education Center.

Rodale’s Organic Life writes, that the secret to great tomatoes is all in the roots. Plants with big root systems need less water and can stand up to summer storms.

To encourage your tomatoes to put down robust roots, start by taking a look at the stems of your tomato seedlings. The fine “hairs” lining the stem develop into roots when they come into contact with moist soil. Burying a large portion of the stem at planting time effectively doubles the size of the plant’s root system and encourages productive plants.

Tip #3

This tip is crucial to planting, growing, and harvesting an abundant of tomatoes. Test your soil. Why? Tomatoes grow and produce well in soil that is more acidic, between 6.0 – 6.8 pH.

You can take a sample of your soil to the horticultural department of your local collage or University for lab testing, or you purchase a pH level testing kit.

After you have discerned your garden soils alkaline and acidity levels, you can add the appropriate organic soil amendments to reach the recommended 6.0 – 6.8 pH for tomatoes. Most garden centers can tell you just what you need to do to get your soil perfect.

Tip #4

prunning tomato suckers for better fruit

Image credit: Fine Gardening

 

Trick your tomatoes into being stronger by plucking the first flowers that appear. This allows your tomato plants to grow more extensive root systems, as well as a mature and developed leaf canopy, before any fruit is produced.

You should also prune any suckers, which are the little offshoots of the main stem below your first fruit-producing branch.

Fine Gardening says that doing so will allow most of the sugar produced in the first 30 days after transplanting, to be directed to the developing fruit, since the only competition is a single growing tip.

Tip #5

Use tomato cages or supports to grow your tomatoes vertically. When you allow tomato vines to lay on the ground, your plants are much more susceptible to pests and diseases.

When you provide vertical support, these garden dangers have a harder time attacking your plants. Sprawling vines also take up valuable space in your garden.

Tip #6

Organic fertilizer for tomatoesSouthwest Gardener says to fertilize your tomato plants once a month for in-ground tomatoes, and every three weeks for tomatoes in containers.

Adding organic compost, either your own or store bought will also help to encourage healthy growth and a bigger harvest.

Scratch compost into the ground around the stem, and at the same time, trim a few of the upper leaves on each plant.

Tip #7

Whether you decide to plant determinate or indeterminate varieties, consider planting new tomatoes three weeks after your original plants are planted. This will extend your growing season and guarantees that if you run into any weather or pest problems, you are still sure to enjoy multiple, healthy harvests. This means you won’t need to harvest and use your entire crop at once.

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Pumpkin Bacon Pancakes

Pumpkin Bacon Pancakes

These pumpkin bacon pancakes are exceptionally soft and fluffy and the flavor of warm spices with every bite.

These pancakes are not only light and fluffy but also moist due to the addition of pumpkin.

There is nothing better than a stack of pumpkin pancakes made with bacon and topped deliciously yummy maple syrup.

A quick, easy, and delicious breakfast developed for those who love pancakes, bacon, pumpkin and real maple syrup.

Pumpkin Bacon Pancakes

1/2 cup whole wheat flour

1/2 cup all-purpose flour

3/4 tsp. baking powder

1/2 tsp. pumpkin pie spice

1/4 tsp. baking soda

pinch of salt

3/4 cup buttermilk

1/2 cup pumpkin purée

2 large eggs

2 tbsp. coconut sugar

1 tbsp. coconut oil

4 to 5 strips crumbled cooked bacon

Whisk together in a large bowl the first 6 ingredients, and set aside.

In a separate medium bowl whisk together buttermilk, pumpkin, eggs, coconut sugar, and coconut oil.

Gently stir buttermilk mixture into flour mixture. Heat a cast iron griddle coat with butter over medium heat.

Drop heaping tablespoons of batter onto griddle to form a 3 to 4 inch pancake. Drop some of the crumbled cooked bacon. Cook until golden, about 2 minutes each side.

Pumpkin Bacon Pancakes

Plate and drizzle with real maple syrup.

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