Orecchiette with Andouille Sausage and Pesto Chipotle Sauce

Orecchiette with Andouille Sausage and Pesto Chipotle Sauce

Orecchiette is a pasta typical of the Apulia region of Southern Italy. The pronunciation of Orecchiette is : ohr-ay-KYEHT-ee.

The shape of the pasta is what gives it, its name, as it resembles a small ear.

In Italian, the word “orecchio” means “ear”, and the suffix ‘etto’ means ‘small’.

Orecchiette Pasta – Left has Ridges and Right has a Smooth Surface

What’s Andouille Sausage

As for the andouille sausage, it is the star ingredient of Cajun-style dishes, including jambalaya and gumbo.

But despite it’s Cajun reputation, Andouille actually originated in French cuisine.

The large sausage is made from the digestive tract of a single pig. The sausage is mixed with onions and seasonings.

The prepared mixture is put into a casing made from the pig’s large intestine, poached, and allowed to cool.

But andouille sausage found in U.S. stores is prepared Cajun-style from the upper shoulder of a pig and mixed with spicy seasonings. Instead of being poached, it is twice smoked.


Try This Cajunstyle Inspired Dish Tortellini Primavera with Cajun Shrimp


Andouille is sold pre-cooked. It’s really easy to work with. You simply take it out of the fridge, slice it and serve it cold on a cheese and meat platter, on its own or in a pasta recipe.

Is Chipotle A Chili Variety

Chipotle is not a particular chili, but rather is a smoke-dried ripe jalapeño chili pepper.

It is used for seasoning primarily Mexican and Mexican-inspired cuisines, such as Tex-Mex and Southwestern United States dishes.


Read More Here About Mexican vs. Tex-Mex: What is the Difference?


More commonly made from red jalapeños, chipotles date as far back as the Aztecs, who smoked peppers as a preservative measure because the jalapeño’s thick flesh would rot before completely air drying.

Orecchiette with Andouille Sausage and Pesto Chipotle Sauce

16 ounces orecchiette pasta, cooked

2 Andouille sausage links, sliced (about 1/2 pound)

3/4 cup basil pesto, jarred or fresh made (link here for recipe – History of Pesto Sauce)

2 teaspoons chipotle peppers in adobo sauce

1 cup colored cherry tomatoes (about 15 whole cherry tomatoes), sliced in half

1 pound green beans, trimmed, cut in half

Add adobe sauce to the pesto sauce. Mix together well, set aside.

Prepare green beans and cherry tomatoes and set aside.

Cook pasta according to package instructions. Last three minutes of cooking time, add prepared green beans.

Drain, but do not rinse. Set aside.

Slice sausage into 1/2 inch slices. Heat a large skillet over medium heat, add a tablespoon of olive oil, add meat and move about until heated through, about 5 minutes. Remove from pan.

In the same large skillet, add the pasta, green bean mix, the cup of basil pesto mix, sausage; mix well until coated with sauce.

Plate and serve.

Here’s some yummy Toasted Sourdough Garlic Cheese Bread to go with your Orecchiette pasta dish.


More Deliciously Yummy Recipes

Gluten Free Creamy Pesto Fettuccine

Gluten Free Creamy Pesto Fettuccine

I like going to the Kona Grill here in town. They make the best Apple Walnut Bread Pudding and a wonderful Macadamia Chicken Salad. My favorite though is their Basil Pesto Linguine. I did adventure into the kitchen and used my cooking skills to try and mimic the dish (I posted it here: Basil Pesto Linguine). It came out pretty good, though it still needed something. So back to Kona Grill I went.

This time I was fortunate, as the manger came by my table and asked how our food was. I told her that I had tried my hand at making this dish, but it still needed something. She told me the pesto sauce contained chipotle peppers in adobo sauce as well. Then she said that is all she could say. But for me that was enough.

Play the video to get a glimpse at the finished dish. Though we did forget to put the small cherry tomatoes, we did even miss them, As the recipe had the same flavor as the Kona Grill. This time though I used gluten free fettuccine pasta.

Here is what you will need for the featured recipe.

16 ounces of cooked gluten free Fettuccine

1 lb. of chicken breasts, about 2, skinless and boneless

2 Andouille sausage links, about ½ pound

Can of Chipotle Peppers in Adobe Sauce½ cup fresh basil pesto (link here for recipe – History of Pesto Sauce)

1 teaspoon chipotle peppers in adobo sauce

1/3 cup heavy cream

15 cherry tomatoes (about), sliced in half to measure 1 cup (optional)

Cook gluten free fettuccine according to package instructions.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees

Meantime, while chicken is a little frozen, slice chicken breasts horizontally 2 to 3 times, depending on thickness of the breast meat. Cut slices into 1-inch chunks. Place cut chicken onto a baking sheet and place in heated oven for 15 to 20 minutes or until chicken is oblique in color and no longer pink.

Next add pesto to a small bowl and mix in adobo sauce and heavy cream, and set aside.

Cooked chciken and andouille sausage with creamy pesto

Place a large frying pan over medium heat and add 2 tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil. Next slice links down the middle and remove meat from casings and place into pan and start moving meat around with a spatula, so meat falls apart into small chunks.

Now add cooked chicken, and mix in with sausage. Next add pesto – chipotle sauce and mix in.

Prepared Gluten Free Creamy Pesto Fettuccini in a large ceramic coated  pan

Next add cook gluten free pasta, and mix till well incorporated.

Gluten Free Creamy Pesto FettuccinePlace pasta onto a serving platter, then plate and serve.

 

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Basil Pesto Linguine

Basil Pesto Linguine - plated

Are you familiar with Andouille sausage, which has its origins in Brittny, France. It is a smoked meat using pork.

The sausage is used in used in Louisiana Creole culture. It is a sausage much like Mexican style chorizo as some Andouille sausage makers also use the gastrointestinal system of the pig.

Andouille is made from smoked pork, garlic, pepper, onions, wine, and seasonings.

Most Andouille is made from a Boston Butt roast. The sausage is doubled smoked, as once the casing is stuffed, it is smoked again.

Andouille is not a high fat sausage, with lots of pepper flavor, though it has a slight heat to it.

Basil Pesto Linguine

16 ounces of cooked linguine

1 lb. of chicken breasts, about 2, skinless and boneless

2 Andouille sausage links, about ½ pounds

½ cup fresh basil pesto (link here for recipe – History of Pesto Sauce)

15 cherry tomatoes (about), sliced in half to measure 1 cup

Cook linguine according to package instructions.

Meantime, slice chicken breasts horizontally 2 to 3 times, depending on thickness of the breast meat. Cut slices into 1-inch chunks, set aside.

cooking andouille sausage

Place a large frying pan over medium heat and add 2 tablespoons of avocado oil.

Next slice links down the middle and remove meat and place into pan and start moving meat around with a spatula, so meat falls apart into small chunks.

sausage, chicken meat with basil pesto

Now add chicken, and continue to cook, until both meats are cooked, and chicken is no longer pink, but oblique. Next add basil and mix in.

meats and cheery tomatoes

Now add tomatoes and cook until tomatoes skins start to wrinkle, about 5 to 7 minutes.

Basil Pesto Linguine - close up

Add cooked linguine and mix meat and pasta together.

Basil Pesto Linguine - plated

Place pasta onto a serving platter, then plate and serve.

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The History of Pesto Sauce

Pesto Sauce

Pesto is a sauce originating in Genoa in the Liguria region of northern Italy, and from the time the Italians invented pesto it has always been prepared with crushed garlic, basil, and European pine nuts blended with olive oil, Parmigiano Reggiano cheese, and including Fiore Sardo, a cheese made from sheep’s milk.

It is possible the mineral-rich seaside soil and temperate climate of Liguria is why pesto sauce has  become a beloved sauce in northeren Italy, as they have the perfect conditions for growing basil.

The Meaning of Pesto

Different Materials to make Mortars and Pestles

Click To Enlarge For Better Viewing

The Italian word for pesto: pestare, means to pound, or to crush. Pesto was originally prepared with a marble mortar and wooden pestle.

The ingredients were pounded or crushed with a circular motion of the pestle in the mortar.

The book “Pesto Genovese: an Ageless Benchmark of Great Italian Cuisine,” writes that the ancient Romans ate a paste called moretum, prepared by crushing cheese, garlic and herbs together.

Because the term pesto is a generic word for anything that is made by pounding or crushing, that leaves the original pesto sauce recipe open to flexible and differing ways to prepare the sauce.

Flexible Ways to Prepare Pesto Sauce

In accent Provence, France the pesto was prepared without using pine nuts, as no pine trees grow there to provide the nuts. Sometimes almonds are used instead of pine nuts, and mint leaves are mixed in with the basil leaves. Some have even used spinach or cilantro in place of basil.

grated Asiago cheese

Grated Asiago Cheese

The interchangeable use of the nuts and greens just depends on your taste. In our kitchen at Splendid Recipes and More, we have used pecans in place of pine nuts, and almost always use Asiago cheese in place of the traditional Parmesan cheese.

Here’s the recipe for the traditional pesto sauce, though as we said, at Splendid Recipes and More, we use Asiago cheese. Here is what you will need.

Pesto Sauce - over head shot2 cups packed fresh basil leaves, no stems

¼ cup pine nuts

2 large garlic cloves

½ cup grated Romano/Parmesan or Asiago cheese

½ cup extra virgin olive oil

Place all the ingredients in a food processor, except oil, and pulse. Start to add oil slowly, pulsing until ingredients form a smooth paste.

Note: If you do not use right away, or there are left overs, store in a jar with a layer of olive oil on top to prevent discoloration, and top jar with a tight lid and store in the refrigerator. Will store for 3 to 5 days.

Pesto is no doubt one of the worlds most loved sauces, next to the mayonnaise and the Mexican traditional salsa.

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