Tortellini & Peas with Mascarpone Alfredo Sauce

Tortellini & Peas with Mascarpone Alfredo Sauce

Tortellini with Mascarpone Alfredo Sauce and Peas is an easy pasta dish that features mascarpone instead of the traditional heavy cream.

Mascarpone is an Italian cheese from the Lombardy region.

It is a thick, triple cream cheese with a texture more like butter or custard than the slightly grainy texture of ricotta.

It’s made in a similar way to sour cream and crème fraîche, but its flavor is sweeter by comparison.

You can use it in soups, stews, and sauces.

It’s a good substitute for cream in pan sauces, mashed potatoes, or pasta dishes.

Like this Tortellini & Peas with an Alfredo Sauce using Mascarpone.

Tortellini & Peas with Mascarpone Alfredo Sauce

1 – 9 oz. package of refrigerated, prepare Tortellini, stuffed with cheese

2 tablespoons olive oil

8 ounce Mascarpone cheese

1/4 cup Parmesan cheese

1/2 teaspoon granulated garlic

1/2 cup crème fraîche

1/2 cup peas, fresh or frozen

Salt and black pepper to taste

Pre-heat broiler with a rack 6 inches from heat source.

In a liquid measuring cup whisk together well, mascarpone, garlic, crème fraîche, and a generous pinch of salt and black pepper. Set aside.

In a medium heat- proof skillet over medium-high heat add two tablespoons of olive oil and heat.

Add tortellini in a single layer. Cook without stirring, until pasta is holed brown on bottom, about 2-3 minutes.

Next, add to pan 1/2 cup water and immediately cover pan with a lid. Cook until tender, about 5 minutes.

Uncover and continue cooking until tortellini is crisp on the bottom. Add 1 tablespoon as needed if browning to quickly.

Next add sauce and peas to tortellini and mix well. Add half the Parmesan cheese in large pinches to avoid clumping. Mix in well.

Bring to a simmer and cook, stirring occasionally, until sauce is slightly thickened, 1-2 minutes.

Remove skillet from stove from heat source and seasoning with salt and black pepper.

Sprinkle remaining Parmesan over tortellini and peas. Broil on top oven rack until golden brown, about 1-2 minutes. Watch carefully as broilers vary.

Remove from under broiler. Plate and serve.


If this recipe got your palate salivating, then you need to try our Baked Cheese Tortellini with Bacon Vegetables & A Rosemary Alfredo Sauce

If you like the idea of mascarpone in a savory dish other than a dessert, like Tiramisu, then you’ll enjoy making this Flatbread with Zucchini Smoked Bacon and Mascarpone Cheese.


More Deliciously Yummy Recipes

Creamy Spinach Parmesan Orzo

Creamy Spinach Parmesan Orzo

What comes to mind when you see or hear the word “Orzo.”

Could it be the 6 Orzo families who were living in New York City (USA) in the 1920’s.

Or could it be Caffè d’orzo – a type of hot drink, originating in Italy.

Caffè d’orzo or Barley Coffee

Most of us though think of the small, rice-shaped pasta that is traditionally used in soups or salads. 

Orzo is a very versatile pasta that has been widely adapted by chefs in Italy and America for both main courses, as well as side dishes, including soups and pasta salads.

Though it originated in Italy – Orzo has been used in multiple cuisines such as Greek, Turkish and Spanish for centuries.

Isn’t Orzo Actually a Form of Rice

Simply put, Rice is rice, while orzo is rice-shaped pasta.

Rice and orzo share characteristics, but the two foods are not identical or the same.

Both rice and orzo are versatile and interchangeable.

Orzo can be used in place of rice to make a Pilaf or orzo can be a replacement to make a Risotto.

Chicken and Pumpkin Orzotto

Creamy Spinach Parmesan Orzo

2 tablespoons olive oil

1 small yellow onion, diced

2 cloves garlic, minced

2 1/2 cups dried orzo pasta

2 cups chicken or vegetable broth

2 cups whole milk

2 cups packed baby spinach, coarsely chopped

1 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese, plus more for serving

Kosher salt

Freshly ground black pepper

Heat the oil in a large Dutch oven or pot over medium-high heat until shimmering.

Next, add the onion and sauté until softened and fragrant, about 3 minutes. Add the garlic and orzo, season with salt and pepper, and sauté until fragrant, about 1 minute.

Next, stir in the broth and milk and bring to a boil. Cover, reduce to a simmer, and cook, stirring occasionally, until the orzo is al dente and most of the liquid is absorbed and has formed a creamy sauce, about 10 minutes or according to package instructions.

If the orzo isn’t completely cooked once this has happened, you can add another splash or two of broth to the pot and continue to simmer until it has.

Creamy Spinach Parmesan Orzo

Next add the spinach and Parmesan and stir in until the spinach has just wilted and the cheese melts, about 1 minute.

Taste and season with salt and pepper as needed. Garnish with additional cheese if desired.

Orecchiette with Chorizo and Chickpeas

Orecchiette with Chorizo and Chickpeas

Orechiette is a distinctive Puglian type of pasta shaped roughly like small ears, as orecchio in Italian means eat, and Orecchiette means little ears.

The pasta is roughly 3/4 of an inch across, slightly domed, and the centers are thinner than the rim of the pasta. The pastas texture is soft in the middle and more chewy along the rim or outside of the pasta.

The pasta makers “Barilla” says that Orecchiette is the signature pasta of Puglia, describing Puglia as a humble farming land situated along the southeastern coast of Italy.

Here is a video posted to You-Tube of Italian women in Italy making fresh Orechiette pasta.

Orecchiette with Chorizo and Chickpeas

2 tablespoons olive oil

2 small shallots, chopped

3/4 pound fresh Mexican chorizo casings removed

2 tablespoons tomato paste

1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes

2 cups chicken broth

1 15-ounce can chickpeas, rinsed

12 ounces Orecchiette

Garnishes:

Fresh chopped cilantro or parsley

Finely grated Parmesan and lemon zest

cooking Mexican chorizoHeat olive oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add shallots and saute, stirring often, until beginning to brown and smell fragrant, about 3 minutes. Add chorizo to pan and break up with a spoon, and cook meat until browned and cooked through, about 5-7 minutes.

adding chickpeas to meat sauceNext add tomato paste and red pepper flakes to meat mixture and mix in. Next add the broth, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat, and simmer, stirring occasionally, until sauce is thickened a bit, about 15-20 minutes. Next add the can of chickpeas, and mix in, cooking 2 minutes more to heat the chickpeas through.

adding orechiette to meat sauceMeanwhile, cook pasta according to packaged instructions. Drain the pasta, reserving 1 cup of the pasta cooking liquid.

Next add the pasta and 1/2 cup pasta cooking liquid to meat sauce. Continue to cook until sauce thickens and coats pasta, about 3 minutes. Add the pasta liquid as needed. You might use the whole cup, and possibly less.

Orecchiette with Chorizo and Chickpeas in the panServe pasta topped with cilantro or parsley (your choice), Parmesan, and lemon zest.

Orecchiette with Chorizo and ChickpeasWe have had this for left overs a few times, and each time we add cilantro, cheese, and lemon zest. The zest adds great flavor to this dish. Be sure to use it.

For the side salad using candy cane beets, find recipe here: Shredded Candy Cane and Green Apple Slaw with Pecans.

What Others Are Reading:

Asparagus and Bacon Cream Pasta

Asparagus and Bacon Cream PastaAccording to Food History asparagus has a long history as far back as the first century. There are records of it growing in ancient Greece and Rome. History even records Egyptians over 2,000 years ago cultivated asparagus for medicinal reasons (Kitchen Project)

Of course most eatable plants were first discovered growing wild, and asparagus is no exception. A wild asparagus has thin shoots thinner than a pencil and is much different than the asparagus that we find in the market.

Nutrition facts asparagusThrough selective breeding and growing techniques, a modern non wild asparagus has a thicker stem with more edible flesh.

Asparagus is even a low carbohydrate food, and a 15 on the glycemic index, which is the rating of plant food and how it effects your blood glucose or insulin in the body (0-35 is low).

Now for our featured recipe, and here is what you will need.

 

8 slices thick-cut bacon, chopped

1 pound fresh asparagus, trimmed and cut into 1″ pieces

2 cloves garlic, minced

1 lb pasta (your choice)

2 cups Alfredo sauce (homemade or your favorite store bought brand)

Himalayan salt

black pepper

Cook pasta according to package directions. Reserve 1/2 cup of pasta water before draining. Return the pasta to the pan that you cooked it in, and set aside.

Heat a large skillet over medium heat. Cook the bacon until browned, but not crispy. Remove and place on paper towel lined plate to drain.

Remove all but 2 tablespoons of grease from the skillet, and return to the stove. Add the chopped asparagus to the pan, stirring occasionally. Cook until tender, about 7 minutes. Add the garlic to the skillet, and cook for 1 minute more.

Add the cooked asparagus, garlic, bacon, and Alfredo sauce to the pot of cooked pasta. Toss to combine. If the sauce is too thick, add a bit of the saved pasta water to thin it out. Season to taste with Himalayan salt and pepper before serving (optional).

What Others Are Reading:

Spaghetti Carbonara

Spaghetti CarbonaraAs with many recipes, the origins of the dish Spaghetti Carbonara and its name are uncertain or ambiguous. There are countless speculations as to the origin of the name, which some have concluded the name Spaghetti Carbonara may be more recent than the dish itself.

The name is derived from carbonaro, Italian for charcoal burner. Some believe the dish was first made as a pasta meal for Italian charcoal workers. Another theory is American soldiers who combined bacon and eggs with pasta, after they had occupied Italy in the post-war era.

Yet another theory is Ippolito Cavalcanti a highly influential chef of nineteenth-century and Neapolitan cook book author, “Cucina Teorico-Pratica” (1839) which included a recipe for pasta with eggs and cheese.

The third edition book “On Cooking” (2003) written by  Sarah Labensky, writes about techniques from expert chefs., and included are the variations of Spaghetti Carbonara. She says outside of Italy may chefs include the addition of other ingredients with Spaghetti Carbonara, such as peas, broccoli, mushrooms, or other vegetables.

Here at Splendid Recipes and More we tried to stick to the original recipe, though we did not include any black pepper. Here is what you will need.

1 lb. spaghetti

12 slices thick bacon, cut into 1 inch slices

4 large eggs

¾ cup grated Parmesan cheese

½ cup heavy cream

salt and pepper to taste (optional)

boiling water to cook pastaCook the spaghetti according package instructions. In a large measuring cup or small mixing bowl, combined the eggs, cream, and cheese, then set aside.

cutting bacan for Spaghetti CarbonaraNext, prepare bacon, and in a large skillet, cook cut bacon over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until crisp. Transfer bacon to a paper-towel-lined plate, and set aside.

cooked pastaDrain pasta, leaving some water clinging to it. Do not rinse pasta, but quickly add hot pasta back to a heated skillet and add the egg mixture along with the bacon, and toss to combine. The heat from the hot pasta will cook the eggs, though you don’t want the eggs to have a scrambled look.

Spaghetti Carbonara

Plate Spaghetti Carbonara on to a platter and serve immediately. You can sprinkle with additional Parmesan cheese, if you desire.

 

What Others are Saying About Pasta Dishes:

Tortellini and Summer Sausage with Tomato Basil Vinaigrette

Plated close up of  Tortellini and Summer Sausage with Tomato Basil VinagretteSummer sausage is any sausage that can be kept without refrigeration. Summer sausage is usually a mixture of pork and other meat such as beef or venison.

The sausage can be dried or smoked, and while curing ingredients vary significantly, curing salt is almost always used. Seasonings may include mustard seeds, black pepper, garlic salt, or sugar.

Sausage has its origins since ancient times as a method of preserving meat.

Summer sausage is not necessarily made in the summer. It is made with meat scraps, and some makers will combine meats for efficiency and flavor variety.

Lean meat is used to ensure that the sausage does not become rancid during the curing process.

Tortellini and Summer Sausage with Tomato Basil Vinaigrette

ingredients for Tortellini and Summer Sausage with Tomato Basil Vinagrette

Before making the vinaigrette, boil and cook the tortellini according to package instructions.

1 cup chopped seeded plum tomatoes

1 cup packed coarsely chopped fresh basil

1/4 cup red wine vinegar

2 tbsp. balsamic vinegar

1 tbsp. Dijon mustard

Place the first 6 ingredients and 1/2 cup of the olive oil into a food processor. While processing, add the remaining 1/2 cup of olive oil, and process until well blended. You can season to taste with salt and pepper. But as the sausage is curd with salt, you may not want to add any salt to the mixture. Set aside.

chopped Plum tomatoes in food processor

Prepare the tomatoes, seeding them, and then placed them first in the processor, and put the seeds and veins into a small strainer, and placed it over the opening of the processor to allow the  tomato juice to drip off over the cut plum tomatoes.

Next slice sausage into small strips, and slice into threes, 1 cup medium olives.

Tomato Basil Vinagrette at bottom of salad bowl

Add 1 cup of tomato basil vinaigrette to bottom of a large serving bowl. Next add prepared sausage, and olives.

adding Tortellini

Add cooled tortellini to the bowl, and mix till ingredients are will coated well with basil mixture.

Plate and enjoy.

Tortellini and Summer Sausage with Tomato Basil Vinagrette

Try theses other pasta and sausage recipes.

Orecchiette with Andouille Sausage and Pesto Chipotle Sauce

Roasted Turkey Sausage with Apples and Butternut Squash

What Others are saying About Basil, Pasta, and Vinaigrette:

Yellow Summer Squash Pasta & Sauce

Yellow Summer Squash Pasta and SauceMost yellow summer squash is gmo now days, but not the ones we used. We got these fresh from a vegetable garden, harvested from non-gmo seeds. Without the grated cheese, this can be a Vegan meal.

Yellow Summer Squash Pasta and Sauce - Shaving Squash into SpaghettiThere are several gadgets on the market that one can use to turn a yellow summer squash into spaghetti strands. They can range from $3.99 to about $100.00 depending on the one you buy. We bought a OXO Good Grips Julienne Peeler Stainless Steel Blade , and the cost was $9.99 at Macy’s.

You wash the squash, remove the blade protector cap, grab the squash in one hand and the peeler with the other hand, and start peeling until you reach the seeds.

You can mulch the rest of the vegetable after discarding the seeds or remove the seeds and steam the vegetable flesh in a steamer, and enjoy with a little butter and Italian seasonings.

But before you peel the squash into spaghetti strands, let make some sauce. What you will need is:

1 15 ounce can of stewed tomatoes, with no other flavors or added salt

1/2 cup fresh basil

3 cloves fresh garlic

2 tbsp. tomato paste, no added salt

1/2 tsp. Himalayan salt ( or sea salt) optional

5 tbsp. olive oil

1 tsp. garlic powder

Open can of tomatoes and pour into a food processor. Add basil, chopped garlic, and puree.

Side not: allow garlic to set 10 minutes after chopping before adding to processor. To get the health benefits of garlic, oxygen needs to active the enzymes within the garlic, to give us it s health benefits. When ever using garlic after mincing, or chopping it, allow it to set for 10 minutes before using it, your body will be thankful you did.

Yellow Summer Squash Pasta and Sauce - Preparing SauceNow add the puree tomato sauce to a medium sauce pot over a med-high heat. You will note that the tomato sauce will be a little soupy. Just add 2 tablespoons of tomato paste and stir in, and see how it thickens. Lower heat to simmer and place lid over pot. Just before pouring sauce over sqauch pasta, stir in 1/2 teaspoon of Himalayan salt, but is optional.

Yellow Summer Squash Pasta and Sauce - Sautéing Yellow Squash in Olive OilOn med-high heat place a (1) large ceramic coated frying pan, and pour 4 to 5 tablespoons of olive oil into pan. Allow to heat some, then add 1 teaspoon of powdered garlic.

Next, (2) add squash pasta to pan, put timer to 5 minutes, and stir now and again.

Note (3) the olive oil has stuck to the squash, if it hasn’t, then you added to much olive oil. Continue to stir now and again.

After 5 minutes (4) turn squash pasta onto a flat plate or pie pan and set aside for 2 minutes. Then turn pasta squash into a strainer to drain off any water, that may have accumulated, but do not rinse.

Yellow Summer Squash Pasta and Sauce platedPlate squash pasta, top with spaghetti sauce and with your favorite Italian cheese and serve.

Forking Yellow Summer Squash Pasta and SauceIf you can fork the squash pasta like traditional pasta, then it was cooked right. But if  squash cannot be forked and falls apart, it was cooked to long and in too much oil.

 

What Others are Saying About Squash and Spaghetti:

Pesto Orecchiette with Chicken Sausage

Pesto Orrechette with Chicken Sausage

Italian cuisine is always an elaborate meal. You gather several ingredients and spend half the day or more. But this recipe , this Italian pasta dish, is fast , simple and easy in under 40 minutes. It has vegetables for lots of vitamins and minerals. Garlic good for digestion and helps fight against stomach cancer. Also controls your blood pressure.

Basil leaves contain much health benefiting essential oils such as eugenol, citronellol, linalool, citral, limonene and terpineol. These compounds are known to have anti-inflammatory and antibacterial properties. Vitamin K in basil is essential for many coagulant factors in the blood and plays a vital role in the bone strengthening function by helping the mineralization process in the bones.

As a side note this is a great nutritional meal for those who suffer with Schizophrenia (Read More Here: Nutritional Hope for Schizophrenic Patients).

What is pasta Orecchiette?

Pasta-Orecchiette

Orecchiette is a type of pasta shaped roughly like small ears, hence the name Orecchiette which in Italian means little ears. It is pasta typical of Puglia, a region of southern Italy.

Orecchiette is about ¾ of an inch across, somewhat domed, and the center is thinner than the rim of the pasta therefore, giving the pasta its interestingly variable texture soft in the middle and a little chewier on the outer part. You can purchase it with a  smooth surface, as in the image or with ridges. Both are the same flavor and texture.

Enjoy the food video!!

 

What Others are Saying About Orecchiette Pasta:

Herb and Chicken Penne with Creamy Italian Cheese

Herb Chicken Penne with Creamy Italian Cheese

Delectable Italian deliciousness in a snap!! This meal is easy to make, in about 30 to 40 minutes.

Before we get started let’s see what the nutritional benefits of this pasta dish is.

Whole wheat Penne pasta is called for in this recipe. The whole wheat or brown pasta retains the fiber of the wheat flour. Therefore making the pasta a complex carbohydrate, not a simple carbohydrate like the traditional pastas with the fiber removed before being ground to flour. Complex carbohydrates digest slower, leaving you to feel full longer, giving more energy and controlling your blood sugar levels. This is great for diabetics.

A serving of Chicken (3 oz) provides 65% of your daily need of protein. The recipe also uses flaked sun-dried tomatoes, but before they are processed, one cup of sun-dried tomatoes provides 7.6 grams of protein, 1.6 grams of fat, and 6.6 grams of dietary fiber, which is equal to 27% of your daily need for fiber.

Sun-dried tomatoes serve as an excellent source of minerals, including potassium and magnesium. They also are filled with vitamins K and niacin a B vitamin. Vitamin K helps with blood clotting and wound healing and niacin is good for brain function (source for sun-dried tomatoes: Livestrong).

cooked and rinsed whole wheat penne pastaHere are the step by step instructions with complete recipe to follow.

Cook 2 cups of whole wheat Penne pasta according to directions on package. Drain well, set aside.  Mix spices, including corn starch or arrowroot in a small bowl, set aside.

 

 

 

Here are the spices needed:

1 tablespoon sun-dried tomatoes flaked or powder

1 teaspoon coarse sea salt

1 teaspoon marjoram

1 teaspoon dried thyme

1 teaspoon dried oregano

1 ½ teaspoon sugar

1 tablespoons dried onion

1 teaspoon corn starch or arrowroot powder

½ teaspoon black pepper

¼ teaspoon garlic powder

 

If you have allergies to corn than you can use arrowroot starch. You will find this starch in your local Whole Foods Market or other local health food store.

Also, you may not find flaked or powdered sun-dried tomatoes. Just buy whole dried sun-dried tomatoes and place one or two small dried tomatoes in a food processor and process to flakes or powder. It is your preference.

melting unsalted butter, adding chicken to cook until no more pink

Melt 2 tablespoons of unsalted butter in large skillet on medium-high heat. Add chopped chicken, cook and stir 5 minutes or until lightly browned, or no pink is present and the meat is oblique in color.

mixing cooked chicken with spices, tomato, cream and cheese

 

Next add spices, 1 14.5 oz. can of petite tomatoes undrained, 1 cup of cream cream and 1/2 cup of fresh grated Parmesan- Rigatino cheese.

Mix in; bring to a boil, stirring constantly until well blended and starts to thicken some. Reduce heat to low; simmer 5 minutes.

 

Mixing in pasta, stirring to coat and cover pan to let stand for 5 minutes with heat off

Stir in pasta and toss gently to coat; cover and let stand with heat off for 5 minutes.

close-up of Herbed Chicken Penne with Creamy Italian Cheese

Plate and serve with additional Parmesan cheese, if desired.

 

Herb and Chicken Penne with Creamy Italian Cheese

2 cups whole wheat pasta Penne

2 tablespoons butter, unsalted

1 pound chicken breasts cut into 1 inch chunks

1 tablespoon sun-dried tomatoes flaked or powder

1 teaspoon coarse sea salt

1 teaspoon marjoram

1 teaspoon dried thyme

1 teaspoon dried oregano

1 ½ teaspoon sugar

1 tablespoons dried onion

1 teaspoon corn starch or arrowroot powder

½ teaspoon black pepper

¼ teaspoon garlic powder

1 14 ½ oz. can petite diced tomatoes, undrained

1 cup cream or half and half

½ cup grated fresh Parmesan-Rigatino cheese

Cook pasta according to directions on package. Drain well, set aside.

 

Mix spices, including corn starch in a small bowl, set aside.

Melt butter in large skillet on medium-high heat. Add chopped chicken; cook and stir 5 minutes or until lightly browned, seeing no pink in the meat.

Next add spices, tomatoes, cream and cheese. Mix in; bring to boil, stirring constantly until well blended and starts to thicken some. Reduce heat to low; simmer 5 minutes.

Stir in pasta and toss gently to coat; cover and let stand with heat off for 5 minutes.

Plate and serve with additional Parmesan cheese, if desired.

 

What Others are Saying About Penne Pasta:

Pasta Fagioli

Pasta Fagioli with Crusty Italian Bread

Do you know the old folk lore of Stone Soup? Will here is how it goes:

Some travelers come to a village, carrying nothing more than an empty cooking pot. Upon their arrival, the villagers are unwilling to share any of their food stores with the hungry travelers. Then the travelers go to a stream and fill the pot with water, drop a large stone in it, and place it over a fire. One of the villagers becomes curious and asks what they are doing. The travelers answer that they are making “stone soup”, which tastes wonderful, although it still needs a little bit of garnish to improve the flavor, which they are missing. The villager does not mind parting with a few carrots to help them out, so that gets added to the soup. Another villager walks by, inquiring about the pot, and the travelers again mention their stone soup which has not reached its full potential yet. The villager hands them a little bit of seasoning to help them out. More and more villagers walk by, each adding another ingredient. Finally, a delicious and nourishing pot of soup is enjoyed by all (credit: Stone Soup).

I am not a traveler, but I do have a cooking pot that does not have a stone in it. Please enjoy my version of Pasta Fagioli.

Here is what you will need:

ingredients for Pasta Fagioli

3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

3 ribs celery, chopped

1 small onion, chopped

3 – 4 medium-sized garlic cloves, finely minced

4 cups chicken stock, preferably homemade, divided

1 teaspoon dried oregano

1 teaspoon dried basil (1 tablespoon fresh)

3 sprigs fresh rosemary, finely chopped (or 1 teaspoon dried)

Pinch crushed red pepper flakes (optional)

3 medium tomatoes, finely chopped seeds and pulp removed

2 medium tomatoes, seeds and pulp removed, pureed

¾ cups uncooked Ditalini or elbow pasta

1 can cannellini beans with liquid

Salt and pepper, to taste

sauting vegetables for Pasta Fagioli

In a heavy bottomed pan, heat olive oil over medium-high heat. Add celery and onions and sauté until tender, but not mushy. Add garlic and cook for 30 seconds to one minute. Do not brown.

adding chicken broth to pot

Add 2½ cups of chicken broth to pot. Season with oregano, basil, rosemary and crushed red pepper flakes, if desired. Sprinkle with salt and pepper.

Add chopped and pureed tomatoes to pot. Simmer on low for 20 – 25 minutes. Add uncooked pasta and cook until tender. Approximately 10 minutes.

Pasta Fagioli

Add beans and reserved liquids to pot and heat through. Ladle into bowls and top with a dollop of fresh pesto, if desired. Serve with freshly grated Parmesan cheese  and crusty Italian bread.

 

What Others are Saying About Pasta Fagioli:

Enhanced by Zemanta