Mexican Cuisine – Turning Hard Corn Kernels Into Something Eatable

Mexican Cuisine – Turning Hard Corn Kernels Into Something Eatable

In every part of the world and from every culture there is a story to be told not just about the people and their culture, but their cuisine as well.

There’s history behind every recipe and particular custom that goes into making a dish.

Historic Mexican Cuisine

Mexican cuisine is one of the most historic the world has to offer, and the history is evident in every Mexican dish that is put together.

Mexican cuisine can be traced back to 7000 B.C.E. The indigenous peoples of Mexico and Central America were able to eat wild chile peppers, beans and corn.

Corn became a part of their diet in 1200 B.C.E. They had learned to farm corn and through a system called Nixtamalization, they were able to soften the hard corn kernels for grinding.

With the ground corn they made tortillas and other corn based recipes.

What Is Nixtamalization

Nixtamalization is a traditional maize preparation process in which dried corn kernels are cooked and steeped in an alkaline solution, which is typically water and calcium hydroxide a food grade lime.

Graphic Image Credit: International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center

After steeping in the alkaline solution the maize is drained, rinsed and the outer kernel cover called the pericarp is removed.

Next the kernels are milled to produce a dough that is the base of over 300 Mexican food products, which includes tortillas and tamales.

As mentioned earlier, Nixtamalization is native to Mexico, though the time in history they learned the process is not know.

Turning Hard Corn Kernels Into Something Eatable

Here are some traditional Mexican plates that have been part of Mexican cuisine for 2000 years or longer.

The Ancient Tostada

Tostadas date back about 2,000 years ago and is said to be invented in Oaxaca, Mexico around the Monte Alban ruins.

Tostadas became a delicious and hearty way to extend and make use of leftover tortillas that were no longer fresh enough to fold for tacos but still fresh enough to be eaten.

Tostada quite literally means “toasted” and typically refers to dishes made over crispy flat tortillas that are either oven toasted or fried.

Find recipe here: BBQ Chicken & Roasted Garlic Black Bean Tostadas.

The Ancient Quesadilla

Quesadillas were developed after Spanish settlers arrived to Mexico in the 16th century.

Turnovers (filled pastries) were very popular in Medieval Spain.

Old world ingredients, such as cheese, chicken or turkey were combined with New World foods such as tortilla (tlaxcalli in Nahuatl) to create what is now known as the quesadilla.

Find recipe here: Chicken Quesadillas.

The Ancient Taco

The taco as we know it today is a blend of ancient Mexican recipes and International influences.

However, before it was known in America, natives in Mexico were eating a version that looked quite different.

Some believe the taco was invented between 1000 and 500 B.C.E.

An article published by the Smithsonian, states the origin of a taco is not exactly known.

Professor Jeffrey M. Pilcher at the University of Minnesota suspects that the taco comes from Mexican silver miners, who likely were the first to invent such a convenient entrée.

Such a theory dates the taco all the way back to the 18th century, making it more than 300 years old.

The original tacos did not contain the cheese, lettuce, sour cream, and tomato that we associate with the meal today.

In fact, the taco as we know it is less than 100 years old.

Find recipes here:

Find more Mexican recipes by typing “Mexican” in the search box below and click search.


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Authentic Mexican Chilaquiles

Authentic Mexican Chilaquiles

Once you know how to make this Mexican breakfast dish, you’ll never throw away a stale tortilla again.

Chilaquiles turns yesterday’s tortillas into a tasty base for an assortment of possible toppings.

The word chilaquiles (pronunced: chee-lah-kee-lehs) is an ancient word from the Aztec Nahuatl language meaning “chilis and greens.”

The Nahuatl language originated in Central Mexico and can still be heard spoken today in some regional communities.

The tradition of preparing chilaquiles has existed for hundreds of years.

Chilaquiles were first brought to the United States by Encarnatión Pinedo, a Spanish Californian who kept her heritage alive through cooking after her family suffered losses in land and status during the U.S.-Mexico War.

Encarnatión shared her chilaquiles recipe with with others in her cookbook – “The Spanish Cook,” published in 1898.

Chilaquiles can be made with either green, red or white chili sauce.

Authentic Mexican Chilaquiles
Authentic Mexican Chilaquiles Made With Green Chili Sauce

Popular toppings for chilaquiles can include, but not limited too, are Mexican Crema, shredded chicken, cotija cheese, beans, cilantro, avocado, pickled jalapeño, and radish slices.

Authentic Mexican Chilaquiles

1 tablespoon vegetable oil

4 cups tortilla chips (approximately 45 chips from a bag)

1 1/4 cups green or red salsa

1/2 cup crumbled queso fresco or Cotija cheese

2 tablespoons Mexican crema (or substitute regular sour cream thinned with a splash of milk)

Lightly coat a large frying pan with vegetable oil. Heat over medium-high heat until oil shimmers.

Spread tortilla chips in pan.

Quickly pour salsa over chips and reduce heat to medium-low. Simmer the chips in sauce, undisturbed, until chips absorb some of the liquid and soften, for approximately 10 minutes.


Cook’s Notes

Substitute leftover corn tortillas for the packaged chips by cutting them into strips, frying them in 375 F vegetable oil until crisp.

Drain them on paper towels as they cool. Proceed with recipe as with the store-bought chips.


Divide chilaquiles between two plates. Sprinkle some cheese and drizzle with cream.

You could also top with cilantro and guacamole – click here for a deliciously yummy Authentic Guacamole recipe.

Make some authentic Mexican inspired food.


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Homemade Mexican Salsa

Homemade Mexican Salsa

Salsa is traced back to the times of the Aztecs, Incas, and Mayans. The native people created their own versions of salsa using tomatoes, chilies and squash seeds.

However, official discovery to the rest of the world did not occur until the Spaniards conquered Mexico in the 1500’s.

This mix of ingredients became popular throughout Spanish civilization, and in 1571, Alonso de Molina named the dish ‘salsa.”

Homemade Mexican Salsa

Salsa in modern times is a favorite appetizer at tail gates, parties, restaurants, and the dinner table.

Homemade Mexican Salsa

2 serrano peppers

1 medium purple onion, quartered

3 garlic cloves

3 medium tomatoes, quartered

4 fresh cilantro sprigs

1/2 teaspoon salt

Tortilla chips

Heat barbecue grill. Place a reusable, washable copper grill mat over grill.

Place prepared vegetables on heated copper sheet. Roast until produce is charred some, about 10-15 minutes.

Occasionally turn vegetables to even char on all sides.

Immediately place serranos plastic bag for about 20 minutes. Peel off and discard charred skins. Remove stems and seeds.

Place onion, garlic, tomatoes, cilantro and salt in a food processor. Cover and process until salsa reaches desired consistency.

Chill until serving. Serve with chips.

Homemade Mexican Salsa

How Long Does Homemade Mexican Salsa Last

Homemade salsa typically lasts for about 7 to 10 days when stored in an airtight container in the fridge.

If you want, add 1/2 to 1 teaspoon of lime juice to help retard spoilage for a longer period of time.

If you like your salsa with a thicker, chunkier consistency, you can strain off some of the extra liquid after chilling.

Try adding a few other dipping options on the side, like homemade guacamole. Find recipe here: Mango Guacamole Chicken Salad.

Find more of your favorite Mexican foods following these links.


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Authentic Mexican Chile Rellenos

Chiles Rellenos are a Mexican dish made up of green chiles stuffed with cheese or meat, breaded and fried, and served with sauce.

They are a Mexican dish that dates back to the 16th century during the Spanish conquest of Mexico.

The first plated rellenos was prepared in the city of Puebla, a town close to Mexico City.

The dish is emblematic in Mexican cuisine as it has an important significance in Mexican cultural identity because of its historic connection with Mexico’s independence from Spain.

The most common pepper used are poblano peppers which are grown and harvested in the city of Puebla.

Other Chiles used include, New Mexico chile, pasilla peppers or even Anaheim peppers are popular as well.


You Love Traditional Mexican Food and You’ll Love Making Traditional Mexican Sopes


Authentic Chile Rellenos

4-6 large poblano peppers, roasted, skin removed, seeded

10 ounces Queso Oaxaca

4 eggs, separated

1 cup avocado oil, high heat use

1/2 cup all purpose flour

Himalayan salt, for seasoning

4 large ripe tomatoes, cored

1/2 white onion

2 garlic cloves, unpeeled

2 serrano peppers

2 teaspoons kosher salt

1 teaspoon dried oregano

1 cup water

2 tablespoons avocado oil, for high heat use

Roasting the Poblanos

Place whole poblano peppers on a parchment paper lined baking sheet in the center of the oven and bake 20-30 minutes, or until skins are blackened, flipping once or twice to achieve even roasting.

Transfer to a heat proof bowl, cover with plastic rap and let cool to room temperature.

Making the Salsa Ranchera

Turn the broiler to high and line a baking sheet with aluminum foil (not recommended to use parchment paper – image shows why 😅).

Roasted Vegetables and Why You Don’t Use Parchment Paper Under the Broiler 😅

Place tomatoes, onion, garlic, and serranos on the baking sheet and place under the broiler.

Check every 2-3 minutes and turn the vegetables so they roast evenly on all sides.

The garlic will cook much faster than the other vegetables. Remove each ingredient as it is done cooking. This should take from 9-15 minutes.

Blend the Salsa Ingredients

Remove the skin from the garlic and the stem and skin from the serranos. If you are sensitive to heat you can also remove the seeds of the serrano peppers too.

Place all the blackened vegetables into a blender along with the 2 teaspoons of salt, the oregano, and the cup of water. Blend on high until smooth.

Fry the Sauce

Heat the 2 tablespoons of oil in a small Dutch oven or heavy bottomed pot over medium-high heat. Add the sauce (careful it will splatter) and fry in the oil until the color deepens and the sauce is fragrant, about 2-3 minutes. Cover and keep warm.

Peel the Peppers

Carefully remove the blackened skin from the peppers. Try your best not to rip or break them. Get off as much as you can and rinse the rest off under running water.

Stuff the Peppers

Cut a slit down the side of each pepper and remove the seeds with your fingers, again being careful not to rip or break them. Rinse out any remaining seeds under running water.

Fill each pepper with 1/2 to 3/4 cup of shredded cheese depending on the size of the pepper—you will use all the cheese.

Place 1-2 fresh epazote leaves inside each pepper if using. Seal closed by threading a toothpick through the opening.

Make the Batter

Beat the egg whites in a bowl of a stand mixer with the whisk attachment on medium-high until they are stiff. Turn the mixer to low and add the yolks one at a time until they are completely incorporated. Add a generous pinch of salt and mix that in as well.

Heat the Oil

Heat the cup of oil in a large frying pan over medium-high heat.

Batter the Chiles

Place flour in a pie plate or shallow baking dish. Season generously with salt. Coat the chiles, one at a time, in the flour, dusting off any excess then dip the chiles into the mixing bowl and cover with the egg batter.

Fry the Chiles

Once the oil is hot add the chiles, one at a time. Adjust the oil temperature as they are cooking. If the oil starts to smoke, turn it down if it becomes too cool, turn up the heat.

Flip the Chiles

Once the chiles are golden brown on one side, flip and cook until golden on that side.

Keep flipping and frying until they are golden all over and they are warmed through, about 5-8 minutes.

Drain the Chiles

Remove to a paper towel-lined baking sheet to drain the excess oil. Repeat with remaining chiles.

Plate chiles top with Salsa Ranchera, chopped cilantro, crumbled queso Oaxaca and serve.

Try these authentic deliciously yummy Mexican Dishes:


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BBQ Chicken & Roasted Garlic Black Bean Tostadas

A tostada (Spanish meaning Toasted) is the name given to various Mexican dishes and other parts of Latin America.

The tostada, when broken into bite size pieces, can be consumed with a dip, like guacamole or salsa.

Corn tortillas are typically used for tostadas though you can also use flour tortillas.


Learn From A Native Mexican How To Make Flour Tortillas – Read More: Tastes of Mexico with Pico de Gallo and Flour Tortillas


Toppings for tostadas are mostly the same as those used for tacos.

The ingredients include cooked chicken, pork, or beef, and including cheese, sour cream, chopped lettuce, onions, radishes, and salsa.


Try This Peach and Mango Salsa With Your Next Mexican Meal


Tostadas unlike chalupas, enchiladas or tacos, are not folded or rolled, but are kept flat.

There are numerous variations of tostada recipes throughout Mexico and Latin America.

And because the tostada can’t not make a claim to only one traditional tostada recipe, the following is a tostada recipe in addition to several hundred other variations.

BBQ Chicken & Roasted Garlic Black Bean Tostadas

This recipe serves 2 plates – Increase Ingredients Accordingly

Meat and Tortillas

1 large chicken breast, cooked, shredded

1/2 cup BBQ sauce, your favorite

4 corn tortillas

1 cup avocado oil, refined for high heat use


Read More Here About The Smoke Point of Oils


Black beans

1 tablespoon olive oil

1 15 oz. can black beans, drained, rinsed

5 cloves garlic, roasted, minced

1/4 cup heavy cream

1 teaspoon Himalayan salt

Topping For Tostadas

2 green onions, finely chopped

1/4 cup cilantro, finely chopped

4 mini-peppers, roasted, skin removed, deseed, finely chopped

1/2 cup sour cream

Cook large chicken breast and shred, add to a large bowl. Next add bbq sauce and mix well. Set aside.

Next add to a small bowl prepared vegetables and roasted peppers. Add salt to taste, mix well. Set aside.

In a large skillet over medium heat add olive oil and heat.

Next add garlic and sauté for two minutes. Next add drained and rinsed black beans with heavy cream and salt to taste.

Using a potato masher, mash beans with cream and garlic until mix is no loner black but a light brown color. Remove from heat and set aside.

Next add avocado oil to a large sauce pan and heat.

When oil is hot, fry tortillas individually (one at a time) both sides, turning 2-3 times. Set aside on a paper towel lined plate.


Cook’s Notes

Before frying the tortillas, make sure oil is hot. If not hot enough tortillas will soak up oil. The hotter the oil, the less time the tortilla has to be in the oil.


Assembling Tostadas

Divide and spread the refried black beans, shredded bbq chicken, sour cream, and topping (in that order) among the four fried tortillas.

Plate and serve.

You Also Need To Try This Mexican Dish – Traditional Mexican SopesTheir Also Deliciously Yummy


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Eggs Rancheros

Traditionally known as ‘Huevos Rancheros’ or ranch-style eggs, this Mexican breakfast or brunch recipe is served over fried corn tortillas and topped with a ranchero sauce or salsa.

Then top that with goat cheese or a Mexican queso fresco cheese and cilantro.

It makes for a deliciously yummy dish.

When you cut into them, the egg yolks mix in with everything, the salsa and tortillas.

This dish is to good to miss out on. If you don’t prefer fried eggs – you can make the eggs scrambled instead.

Who Invented Huevos Rancheros

This dish is a breakfast served in the style of the traditional large mid-morning fare on rural Mexican farms.

The general understanding is that Huevos Ranchers or Eggs Rancheros evolved around hundreds of years ago among the peasant or farmer population of rural Mexico.

While there is no real sources to prove this, it does though seem it could be a recipe of Mexico as this dish world wide is most popular among Mexican farm owners and workers.

The ingredients used are readily available to Mexican farmers. Which is masa, tomatoes, onions, chilies, and eggs. These food stuffs are considered typical staples of any Mexican kitchen.

Another thought is, as with many Mexican inspired recipes, Huevos Rancheros became popular in America for the Mexican immigrants who crossed the US board at the state of Texas to work on American farms in the 1950’s.

Read More Here About Mexican vs. Tex-Mex: What is the Difference?


And these immigrants ate the same food stuffs they did on the farms they worked in Mexico. And it is possible that Huevos Rancheros was one such dish.

In most restaurants today in America that serve Eggs Rancheros, it is served with a side of ham and potatoes rather than the traditional avocado slices and pinto beans.


If eggs are your thing for breakfast than you’ll like this deliciously yummy dish – Mexican Huevos Divorciados


Eggs Rancheros

Per person or serving you will need the following –

Avocado oil – refined oil for high heat frying

2 corn tortillas

2 large eggs

1/2 cup Mexican salsa – Find Recipe Here

2 tablespoons of goat cheese or Queso fresco, a Mexican cheese

2 teaspoons cilantro, chopped

In a medium sized skillet over medium high heat, add avocado oil to fill pan 1/4 to 1/2 inch up the sides.

When oil starts to shimmer, using a pair of kitchen tongs, place one tortilla into hot oil and fry on both sides, about 1-2 minutes.

Remove tortilla from pan with kitchen tongs and place onto a plate. Do the same with the other tortilla.

In a medium skillet over medium-high heat add butter. When melted crack in both eggs.

Add one tablespoon of water and place a lid over eggs for exactly 1 minute.

Remove lid and slide perfectly cooked sunny side up eggs onto tortillas.

In the same skillet you cooked eggs, place skillet over medium heat and add salsa. Let salsa hit pan till bubbles start to form.

Remove skillet from heat and move pan back and forth or gently twirl pan until all of the salsa has been warmed, but not burnt.

You will smell the aroma of the chili in the salad as it warms. Pour warmed salsa over eggs.

Now top with cheese and cilantro , if you desire.

Serve and enjoy!!

Here’s more Mexican inspired recipes –

BBQ Chicken Omelet with Salsa & Goat Cheese

Mexican Chicken Tortilla Pie

Traditional Mexican Sopes

How about dessert – Gluten Free Mexican Chocolate Pumpkin Pie


Tacos al Pastor

Tacos al Pastor

Tacos al pastor is a dish developed in central Mexico that is based on shawarma spit-grilled meat brought by Lebanese immigrants to Mexico.


Read more here about The Tastes of Mexico


Being derived from shawarma, it is also similar to the Turkish döner kebab and the Greek gyros.

The traditional way to make tacos al pastor is with thin slices of marinated pork piled or layered on top of each other on to a large trompo.

“Trompo” is Spanish for “spinning top.”

Once all of the marinated meat is placed on the trompo, it then spins around in front of an open fire until it is cooked through.

Tacos al Pastor
Tacos al Pastor

When the outer layer of meat is cooked, the taquero or person preparing the tacos cuts off layers of meat so that inner layers can continue to cook as well.

As he cuts the meat, it falls off the trompo in small pieces directly onto the tortilla that the taquero holds with his or her other hand.

Taqero Cutting Meat From a Trompo - tacos al pastor
Taquero Cutting Meat From a Trompo

The taco is then served with finely chopped onions, cilantro, pieces of pineapple and either a red or green salsa.

Marinade For Tacos al Pastor

For some it can be hard to make tacos al pastor the traditional way, and it can be difficult to find a place that serves tacos al pastor cooked up the traditional way as well.

There is no reason though for not trying to replicate the flavors without the use a trompo.

You can use 2 to 3 pounds of a pork tenderloin or a pork shoulder blade cut into small chunks and placed into the following marinade.

  • 4 Guajillo Chile boiled, de-seeded, and cleaned
  • 1 Ancho Chile boiled, de-seeded, and cleaned
  • 4 cloves of garlic
  • 1/2 onion
  • 1/2 cup of orange juice
  • 3/4 cup of pineapple juice
  • 1 Tablespoon each of
  • Oregano – Thyme – Black Pepper
  • Cumin – Paprika – Salt
  • 3 Cloves of garlic
  • Blend all of the ingredients together until completely combined.
  • Strain the liquid over a bowl to end up with a smooth marinade.
  • Add one layer of meat in a large bowl or baking dish and cover with the marinade, and then repeat in layers until all of the meat and marinade have been used.
  • Cover the dish with aluminum foil and refrigerate for at least 4 hours
  • Remove from the refrigerator and grill the meat until cooked through.
  • Remove from grill and allow to cool a little and cut into thin slices to serve on warmed corn tortillas.

We topped our tacos with a mango and purple onion salsa (made ahead of time).

Peel and pit one medium mango and dice into small pieces and place into a glass bowl.

Next dice into small pieces one small purple onion and place into bowl with the diced mango.

Chop in some cilantro and squeeze the juice of one small lime over mango mixture and mix in.

If you desire add 1/8 to 1/4 teaspoon of salt and mix in. Set salsa aside until ready to top your tacos.

Warm some corn tortillas, add meat and top with mango salsa and enjoy.

Cooking Simple With Your Family

Collage of adults cooking with their children - Cooking Simple With Your FamilyWe have been interviewing Keisha T. Prosser – The Mobile Cooking Teacher on Using Your Cooking Skills To Teach Others About Good Nutrition (March. 15, 2016) and  The Mobile Cooking Teacher – Inspiring A New Generation Of Cooks (March. 19, 2019). To see the interviews again just click and follow the above links.

Keisha T. ProsserSplendid Recipes: Today we are going to let Keisha explain the right time to start teaching your children cooking skills. Okay Keisha, we pass the platform over to you.

Keisha: Thanks Randy. Do you have children? Have you ever thought when would be a good time to start teaching my child how to cook? But not only cook, but cook healthy meals.

It is true we are all busy, but our children will not always be with us, and they need to know the importance of COOKING. And it doesn’t matter if they are a girl or boy, we all should have some basic cooking skills.

Okay, so when is a good time to start teaching your children? Let’s talk about age groups and what are some skills they can learn during those ages.

Teaching Children Age Appropriate Cooking Skills

Here are the age appropriate cooking skills to teach your children.

Preschoolers – 6 years old

young boy learning to cut with a knife - Cooking Simple With Your FamilyThis age group can help preparing fruit and pasta salads, help with setting the table, and for those who can read, they can read the recipe ingredients and directions with you. Doing so will help them learn to follow recipe directions.

They can measure ingredients, learn how to use a food timer, including a meat thermometer. They can help with making smoothies by allowing the child to place the ingredients into the blender.

This is also a wonderful age group to let help with young girl helping to make cookies - Cooking Simple With Your Familybaking cookies, as they can learn the effort that goes into making one of their favorite snacks.

Explain to them how herbs and spices flavor a recipe. You might think teaching this to a preschooler to 6 year old would be something they wouldn’t understand, which may be true at first. But repetition is key to teaching children the skills of cooking.

Other things this age group can help with in food preparation is preparing breakfast, lunch and dinner, helping with menu planning, as well as helping to clean up the kitchen after eating.

This age group is the right time to start and teach them the importance of eating healthy.

Ages 7-12

young boy learning to cook - Cooking Simple With Your FamilyContinue with what they have learned up to age six, that is measuring ingredients, making smoothies, menu planning, and help with cleaning the kitchen.

Ages 7 to 12 is a good age group to start teaching kitchen prep work, that is cutting up fresh fruits and vegetables, meats, and cheeses that will go into the recipe you are preparing.

Continue with teaching them the importance of healthy eating, flavoring foods with herbs and spices, including following and reading recipe directions.

 

Ages 13-18 

 teen boy preparing a recipe - Cooking Simple With Your FamilyThis age group can start learning to prepare breakfast, lunch and dinner by themselves.

They even make their favorite cookies on their own, including learning how to cook different cuisines, like a simple Asian stir-fry or Mexican food, like tacos.

They still should be encouraged to read and follow recipe directions. At this age let them sit with a paper and pencil and plan out the weeks menu.

Letting them do this will help them learn appreciation for planning ahead to eat, instead of waiting to the last minute when you are really hungry, and may go for some junk food.

Cooking Simple

We all would like meals to be done in 20 minutes or less, at least I do.

young girl cooking - - Cooking Simple With Your FamilyHere are some simple ingredients you can teach your child to mix together to form different recipes in the kitchen.

You can do 3 easy things with these ingredients: Lemon, Garlic, Salt, Sugar, Olive Oil, and Onion.

Salad Dressing: Lemon, Olive Oil, Garlic, Onion, Salt and Lemon Zest.

Marinade: Lemon, Garlic, Onion and Olive Oil

The ideas are endless with these simple ingredients.

Having your family helping in the kitchen more is one way to make sure everyone is eating more fresh fruits and vegetables.

Preparing meals together brings you closer as a family. You are teaching your family how to cook healthier and smarter.

Remember, the heart of the home is in the kitchen, and a healthy kitchen, is a healthy heart.

Splendid Recipes: Thanks so much Keisha, for taking the time out to share all that you have with us on teaching good nutrition through cooking, inspiring future cooks, and cooking together as a family.

Keisha: No thank you Randy for this opportunity. And I appreciate any one who would like to follow me on any one of the social net works I am on.

Splendid Recipes: Yes follow Keisha on any one of the following social net works and keep up with the latest adventures of – The Mobile Cooking Teacher.

What Others Are Reading:

South Of The Border Chicken Tortilla Soup

South of The Boarder Chicken Tortilla Soup

Campbell’s soup says it right with their canned “Homestyle Mexican-Style Chicken Tortilla Soup.”

They describe the soup as packed with ingredients found in kitchens south of the border.

After they describe the ingredients in their soup, they say, “let your taste buds transport to the comforts of the southwest with each delicious spoonful.”

Though this soup has flavors used south of the boarder or Mexico, this recipe is Mexican inspired but was created in the Southwestern part of the United States or New Mexico.


Enjoy These Two Favorites From South Of The Boarder – Tastes of Mexico with Pico de Gallo and Flour Tortillas


The Tortilla

Tortillas are used faithfully in Mexican cuisine.

There are corn tortillas and flour tortillas, which are mostly consumed in Northern Mexico.

Tortillas are a main food staple eaten daily in all Mexican households. Just as you would walk to the corner store for Tortilleriaa gallon of milk, so do Mexicans walk to the corner and buy tortillas from the “Tortilleria” were machines spit out dozens of corn tortillas hourly.

Tortillas are also used to garnish a bowl of Mexican inspired South Of The Border Chicken Tortilla Soup.

South Of The Border Chicken Tortilla Soup

6 tablespoons avocado oil, divided

6 corn tortillas, cut into 1×1-inch strips

1 small white onion, dice

1 red bell pepper, diced

1 green bell pepper, diced

2 garlic cloves, minced

4 cups of chicken broth

1 cup water

¾ teaspoon ground cumin

½ teaspoon chili powder

1 (15-oz) can black beans, drained and rinsed

1 cup frozen sweet corn kernels, thawed

2 cups shredded cooked chicken breast

1 teaspoon Himalayan salt (optional)

Diced avocado, and fresh chopped cilantro, for optional garnish

frying tortilla stripsPlace a large frying pan over medium heat. Add 3 tablespoons of avocado oil and heat. Add tortilla strips and fry until they are crisp.

fried tortilla stripsRemove from heat and using a slotted spoon, remove strips from oil and place onto a plate and set aside.

A ladle of South of The Boarder Chicken Tortilla SoupNext add 3 tablespoons of avocado oil to a 4 quart soup pot and heat. Add the diced onions, garlic, bell peppers, and saute until fragrant.

Next pour in the chicken broth, water, cumin, and chili powder. Stir to mix all ingredients. Next add the black beans, sweet corn, and shredded chicken.

South of The Boarder Chicken Tortilla SoupBring the soup to a boil, then turn heat down to a simmer for about 10 minutes.

Ladle soup into soup bowls and garnish with the tortilla strips, diced avocado, and chopped fresh cilantro.

What Others Are Reading:

Mango Guacamole Chicken Salad

close up of Mango Guacamole Chicken Salad

This salad has flavors of the tropic’s, as it contains mango, avocado, and coconut sugar. It is a quick and easy recipe to prepare.

mango tree with ripe fruit Did you know that mangoes are eaten fresh more than any other fruit in the world?

The mango has been around for some 4,000 years now, and it is biologically a close relative with other flowering plants like the cashew and pistachio trees.

The mango trees originated in sub-Himalayan plains, and there are over 1,000 different varieties, with the Hayden being the most popular.

Mango_tree_Kerala_in_full_bloom

Image Credit: Wikipedia

Mango trees grow up to 115–131 feet tall, with a crown radius of 33 feet. The trees live a long time, as some specimens still fruit after 300 years. Though not a related tree spices, avocado trees can grow just as tall.

When preparing this recipe, it reminded me of our visited to the south of Mexico were the mango trees grow profusely. We seen young children throwing rocks up into the trees to bring down a mango. Yes, they threw a rock up 115 to 133 feet, and never missed to bring down a ripe fresh mango.

Now for our featured recipe: Mango Guacamole Chicken Salad

shredded chicken

Preparation is for two servings.

1 large cooked chicken breast, without bone or skin

3 tablespoons mango puree

3 tablespoons of mayonnaise (Link Here For Homemade Recipe)

1 teaspoon coconut sugar

Shred the cooked chicken breast into a medium bowl and mix with mango puree, mayonnaise, and sugar. Set the mixture aside.

For the Guacamole

1 avocado, seeded and peel removed

1 small tomato, without seeds

2 garlic gloves

2 teaspoons powder coriander

3 tablespoons chopped yellow onion

1 teaspoon white balsamic vinegar

1 teaspoon lime juice

1 teaspoon lemon juice

fresh lemon lime water1/4 teaspoon Himalayan salt

5 to 6 whole pepper corns

Place all the ingredients in a blender, and blend together for 30 seconds to 1 minute. Set aside.

Unless you have another use for the other half of the citrus half’s, and including the juiced half’s, you can either freeze the juiced rinds and save for zest in another recipe, or slice them up for lemon-lime water.

Plating The Salad

Now that you have your chicken mixture and guacamole prepared, let’s start to plate it.

plate of baby greens

Add a mixed few hand fulls of baby greens, like spinach, chard, beet greens, and arugula.

baby greens and Mango Guacamole Chicken Salad

Next, using a 5 inch in diameter ramekin, fill chicken mixer to the top, and invert it over the baby greens.

Mango Guacamole Chicken Salad

Next, spread some guacamole carefully over the chicken mixture, and enjoy.

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