Roasted Butternut Squash & Sausage with Gluten-Free Penne Pasta

Roasted Butternut Squash and Sausage with Gluten Free Penne Pasta - close up

Butternut squash, also known as butternut pumpkin or gramma, has a sweet, nutty taste similar to that of a pumpkin.

When ripe, it turns increasingly deep orange, and becomes sweeter and richer.

Roasted butternut squash has a creamy sweet buttery taste.

It is a good source of fiber, vitamins A & C and including magnesium and potassium.

Sage is a pungent herb. It has been added to the recipe as it gives a feeling of warmth to the dish. It has an earthy taste, combining the scents and flavors of citrus and pine.

Fresh sage is more vibrant and less bitter than when it is dried.

Roasted Butternut Squash & Sausage with Gluten-Free Penne Pasta

4 tbsp. olive oil

1 package chicken sausage

3 cups gluten-free, Penne pasta

2 cups cubed, butternut squash

1 tbsp. dark brown sugar

½ cup pecan pieces

1 stick, salted butter

8 sage leaves, small

½ tsp. Himalayan Salt

½ tsp. black pepper

Slide a small baking sheet into your oven and preheat it to 400 degrees.

Cook gluten-free pasta according to package instructions.

preparing butternut sqaush for Roasted Butternut Squash and Sausage with Gluten Free Penne PastaPeel and cube up two cups of butternut squash.

In a medium bowl, toss the squash with olive oil, salt, pepper and dark brown sugar.

Remove heated aluminum lined baking sheet from oven, add the squash and spread out over aluminum sheet.

Return to oven and roast for 20-25 minutes, stirring vegetables once 1/2 through.

Remove once the squash is tender.

searing chicken sausage for Roasted Butternut Squash and Sausage with Gluten Free Penne PastaIn a large medium heated skillet, add olive oil and sear the chicken sausages on all sides.

Remove, slice and add back to the pan to cook the centers.

In a large mixing bowl, combine sausage, pasta and butternut squash, and set aside.

A 39 second video to show You how to prepare the “Brown Butter Sage Sauce”

Heat a 10 inch skillet on medium heat.

Place the stick of cold butter into the hot pan, lift and swirl the butter.

Add in the sage leaves and keep swirling until the butter has completely melted, should be a deep brown color, but not to the point of burning.

adding pecan pieces to Roasted Butternut Squash and Sausage with Gluten Free Penne Pasta

After you have poured the brown butter sage sauce over the pasta, toss to mix well.

Sprinkle pecan pieces over top and mix in.

Roasted Butternut Squash and Sausage with Gluten Free Penne Pasta - close upPlate and serve.

Another Gluten-free Recipe: Gluten Free Rigate with Roasted Butternut Squash and Smoked Bacon

More Recipes with Butternut Squash

Roasted Butternut Squash with Apples Cranberries and Candied Walnuts

Coconut and Butternut Squash Soup

What Others are Saying About Butternut Squash and Glut-Free Products:

Gluten-Free Flour Substitutions For Baking

Going wheat free doesn’t mean you have to give up breads, cookies and pizza.

There are many flours you can use to substitute in recipes that have delicious results.

Here is a general guide to substituting flour in recipes.

There are a variety of different formulas you can try when substituting wheat flour. Experiment to see what works and tastes best for you.

Gluten-free floursOne thing to note, though, is that alternative flours don’t produce the same texture or consistency as regular wheat flour.

With the lack of gluten, you will need to add a starch to your GF flour.

Know let’s see what these Gf flour substitutes are and the starch’s to use.

Gluten-free (GF) non-wheat flours are generally categorized into three different weights, and these include:

  1. Light starch
  2. All-purpose medium
  3. Heavier whole grain

Light Gluten Free Flours

Light, starchy GF flours include:

  1. sweet rice flour
  2. white rice flour

Medium Gluten Free Flours

Medium GF flours are similar to ‘all purpose flour’- these include:

  1. sorghum flour
  2. oat flour, certified gluten-free
  3. brown rice flour, superfine

If you are unable to find sorghum flour, certified gluten-free oat flour will be your is closest option.

Heavier GF Flours

The heavier grains, including psuedo-grains like quinoa, tend to contain more protein.

Which include:

  1. buckwheat
  2. quinoa
  3. millet
  4. cornmeal
  5. nut meal (such as almond and coconut)
  6. bean/legume flours

These heavier GF flours are similar to baking with whole wheat flour. You get a similar denser product, often darker in color, and with less rise.

Starches To Use With GF Flours

Starches in gluten-free bakingGluten is a general name for the proteins found in wheat. It helps baked foods maintain their shape, acting as a glue, holding food ingredients together.

In gluten-free baking, a starch needs to be substituted. These include:

  1. tapioca starch
  2. cornstarch
  3. potato starch
  4. arrowroot starch

Here are some key points to know about starch in general, and specific differences for using each one.

  • Starches need time to hydrate before going in the oven so rest your batter or dough for up to 30 minutes for improved texture of some baked goods.
  • The high starch content of some gluten free flours can result in a gritty texture. Many batters and doughs benefit from more liquid to properly hydrate.
  • More liquid may then require a longer baking time in some recipes.

Starches for the most part are interchangeable.

Cornstarch

  • This powdery white cornstarch is not the same as corn flour. Do not substitute.
  • Not ideal for baking, too much cornstarch results in baked goods with a starchy texture.
  • Stirring too vigorously may cause a mixture to break down and thin out.
  • Cooking over high heat can cause lumping.
  • Best uses for baking: to thicken pie filling and make puddings.

Potato Starch

  • Made from raw potatoes it has no potato taste. Potato starch is not the same as potato flour. Do not substitute.
  • Provides structure, tenderness and binding power in baking.
  • Too much potato starch gives baked goods a crumbly texture.
  • Best uses: muffins, quick breads and a gluten free flour mix.

Tapioca Starch

  • Tapioca starch is all starch but is also called tapioca flour in recipes. It is the same ingredient.
  • Gives chewy texture, elasticity and structure to baked goods.
  • Aids in creating a crisp crust.
  • Can be used as a thickener for pies and sauces.
  • Too much tapioca starch makes baked goods dense.
  • Best uses: cookies, a flour blend and moist breads

Arrowroot Starch

Arrowroot is extremely versatile and can even be used as a substitute for wheat flour.

It works well when mixed with other gluten free flours like almond flour and coconut flour and is perfect for bread or cake recipes.

  • no break down in acidic ingredients
  • creates a clear gel
  • freezes well and thaws properly
  • when using eggs as the primary binder, adding arrowroot powder will significantly help the process
  • lightens the textures in cakes, quick bread, and cookies in gluten-free and grain-free baking

As you can see, different starches will contribute different textures to your baking.

Take Care When Using Coconut Flour

Coconut flour is a unique, non-grain, fiber rich and highly absorbent flour. If you add it to a recipe blend, you may need to add more fat or liquid.

Therefore, you cannot substitute coconut flour on a 1:1 ratio for all-purpose flour, or most other GF flours.

Coconut flour gluten-free baking

Typically you would combine 1/4 cup coconut flour with almond flour, hazelnut flour, cassava flour and a little tapioca starch for the best flavor and baking properties.

Using coconut flour will require one egg extra in the recipe for each 1/4 cup, for both moisture and structure.

First, incorporate the egg yolks into the coconut flour and other dry ingredients.

Whip the egg whites separately, and fold them into the first mixture to make baked goods lighter.

You may also need to increase other liquids in the recipe or make small adjustments to baking times.

A substitute for coconut flour can be flax-meal, cornmeal, and almond meal.

If you want added fiber and texture in your baked goods, add 1/4 cup flax seed meal to your GF flour blend.

Gluten-free Recipes To Try For Yourself

Gluten-Free Chocolate Peppermint Cupcakes

Gluten Free Iron Skillet Pecan Coconut Cake

Gluten Free Mexican Chocolate Pumpkin Pie

Gluten Free Blueberry Lemon Bread

Gluten Free BBQ Chicken Lasagna

Gluten-Free BBQ Chicken Lasagna

Gluten Free BBQ Chicken Lasagna

Do you worry about weight gain? If your nutrition currently comprises of processed food products, like those that contain simple sugars and refined flour, changing to gluten free eating could help result in weight loss.

Even if you do not have celiac disease, but still experience bloating, vomiting, weight loss, constipation, chronic diarrhea and abdominal pain, and including sneezing, runny nose, headache, and moodiness after eating a product with gluten, then maybe you are allergic to it.

Are you an Autistic adult, have a autistic child? Then a gluten free diet would be to your advantage. Autism is known for causing communication difficulties and social impairments. It is believed that autism among other things, could involve the digestion of peptides, which are similar to proteins, making changes in your diet could help with autism treatment.

Even though evidence is inconclusive, many autistic adults and parents with children who are autistic have found that gluten free eating helps in controlling some behaviors linked to autism, and helping to manage the condition.

Medical science notes that while gluten consumption may not necessarily cause the disease, but it does inflame these conditions (celiac disease and autism) or contribute to flare-ups.

If you love pasta (which contains gluten), you can still enjoy it, eating gluten free. Give our featured recipe, Gluten Free BBQ Chicken Lasagna , and see for yourself.

Here is what you will need.

8 ounces lasagna noodles, gluten free (we used a no-boil ready to cook product)

1.5 pounds of shredded, cooked chicken

1/2 cup red onion, chopped

1.5 – 18 ounce bottles BBQ Sauce (without soy or canola oil or any gmo product)

15 ounce can black beans, rinsed

1 1/4 cup corn kernels, frozen

1/2 cup roasted red bell peppers, chopped

1 teaspoon chili powder

3 cups shredded Italian 3 cheeses

1/4 cup spring onions, diced

Preheat oven to 350 degrees

ingredient mix in a large bowlPrepare and add the chicken, red onion, spring onion, corn, black beans, and roasted red bell pepper to a large mixing bowl.

mixing in chili powder and BBQ sauceNext add chili powder and BBQ sauce, and mix until well incorporated.

coating bottom of pan with BBQ sauceNext coat the bottom of a 13×9 inch glass baking pan with some BBQ sauce. Now layer in some gluten free lasagna pasta. Next spoon on the chicken mixture, top with cheese, and continue with two more layers, finishing with a hefty layer of cheese.

Bake for 55 minutes in heated oven covered with foil, and then uncover and cook for an additional 5 minutes.

just out of the oven - Gluten Free BBQ Chicken LasagnaRemove from oven and let cool about 5 minutes.

Gluten Free BBQ Chicken Lasagna - detailed close upPlate and serve.

 

What others Are Reading:

Gluten-Free Penne with Caponata Sauce

Gluten Free Penne with Caponata Sauce

You have no doubt heard of people who eat a gluten free diet. A gluten free diet excludes gluten, a protein found in wheat and related grains, like barley and rye. Gluten causes health problems in those who suffer with Celiac disease (CD) and in some cases those who may have allergies to wheat.

Some have argued we need carbohydrates and wheat needs to be eaten. Also others have voiced that eating Gluten free is just a fade diet. Are these statements true? We would say no.

Making the choice to take gluten out of your diet is for health reasons, and it has nothing to do with losing weight, as most fade diets proclaim. Secondly, you can obtain the same amount of carbohydrates as you would in wheat products as you can in eating fruits and vegetables.

De Boles Gluten Free  pasta for - Penne with Caponata SauceThe fact is most substitutions used for wheat do have some carbohydrates in them. Such as the product we chose to prepare are featured recipe.

This product De Boles is not exclusive to just using white or brown rice flour or corn flour, no but rather it uses brown rice flour with whole grain quinoa flour and ground flax seed flour, as well as the rice bran.

This gluten free product has 4 servings with 41 grams of carbohydrates per serving. As there is whole grains, and bran, it will not raise blood sugar levels.

Now for our featured all organic recipe: Gluten Free Penne with Caponata Sauce and here is what you will need.

1 red onion

1 red sweet pepper

1 yellow sweet pepper

3 small purple carrots

2 zucchini

1 medium egg plant

2 cloves garlic, minced

14 ounce can roasted tomatoes

1 teaspoon dried oregano

3 – 6 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

Preapred vegtables for - Gluten Free Penne with Caponata Sauce

Cut all the vegetables into chunky dices, but mince the garlic.

Sauting carrots, onions and garlic in olve oil

In a large skillet, saute oil, onions, garlic and carrots for 3 minutes. Next add the eggplant and peppers, and cook 3 minutes more, stirring frequently.

Now add the zucchini and cook 3 minutes more, and again stir frequently.

Adding roasted tomatoes to suateed vegetablesAdd roasted tomatoes….

adding oregano

Add the oregano and stir in, till well incorporated. Let simmer for 10 minutes.

Cooked pasta for - Gluten Free Penne with Caponata Sauce

Mean while, cook the gluten free pasta according to package instructions. Drain do not rinse. By this time the vegetables should have completed the 10 minutes of simmering.

Gluten Free Penne with Caponata Sauce

In a large serving bowl mix vegetables and pasta together. Plate and serve with a favorite meat, such as fresh ground turkey basil and feta sausages, from the Whole Foods Market. Enjoy!!

What Others Are Reading:

Gluten-Free Chocolate Peppermint Cupcakes

Gluten-Free Chocolate Peppermint Cupcakes

For someone new at flour less baking, wheat flour that is, can be a trial-and-error process. Flour, when used in baking, adds body, structure, and texture to baked goods. It often acts as a binder, because of the gluten, binding all the recipe ingredients together. When you remove the gluten or flour, you have to add something else in its place that will perform the same function.

Here are some tips to help achieve better baking results when going flour less.

To increase the nutrition value, substitute up to 1/4 cup ground flax seeds plus 1/4 cup water for 1/4 cup flour in a recipe (flax will absorb more moisture).

To add more moisture to your recipe, add gelatin, extra egg or oil. Honey or rice malt syrup helps retain moisture as well. Honey works great when using coconut flour.

Substitute brown sugar for white sugar to retain moisture.

To enhance the flavor of flour less foods, add chocolate chips, dried fruits or nuts and double the amount of spices asked for in the recipe.

For better structure, add dry milk solids or cottage cheese to the recipe. Replace evaporated milk for regular milk.

Add extra egg or egg whites if your recipe is too crumbly.

Don’t over beat or over mix since the kneading time or mixing time is shorter with no gluten to develop.

You can use ground oats in place of flour, but you will also need bananas or eggs to bind the ingredients together.

Eggs can replace many functions of gluten such as binding and enhancing texture and structure of the recipe. Two other starch-based products you can use to bind and thicken are guar gum and xanthan gum. They are interchangeable and used in small amounts, usally about 1 tablespoon. But these two binders can be expensive, and in place of them you can use corn starch, tapioca starch, or arrow root starch.

Guar Gum used as a food thickener in flourless bakingGuar gum is extracted from the bean of the guar plant. The guar plant is native to Pakistan and India. The guar bean is rich in protein and used to feed cattle, and as a vegetable used in Middle Eastern cooking.

Guar gum is also used to help preserve food, and to help it retain flavor, texture and moisture. Guar gum is recommended to use when baking with coconut flour, as this type of flour can case dryness to your baked.

Xanthan Gum used as a food thinkner in gluten free bakingXanthan gum has a substance called polysaccharide, which has the ability to form a gel and bind many times its weight in water, making it a very valuable food thickener.

If you are allergic to corn products, then it is recommended not to use xanthan gum, as it is derived from corn. But it can also be fermented by using wheat, dairy, or soy as well. Just read the ingredients label to see how it was made.

The key to flour-less baking is to experiment. You may have to try different ingredients or amounts to get the flavor and texture you want.

Now for our featured recipe: Gluten-Free Chocolate Peppermint Cupcakes.

1 ½ cups ground oats

½ cup sugar

½ cup cocao powder

2 teaspoons baking powder

Pinch of salt

1 mashed banana

¼ cup avocado oil or lite olive oil

¾ cup almond milk

½ tablespoon apple cider vinegar

1 teaspoon vanilla

Frosting:

3 cups icing sugar

2 tablespoons of heavy cream, to thicken frosting

1/4 to 1/2  teaspoon peppermint extract

2 drops food coloring, optional

Cupcake Instructions:

Preheat oven to 350 F.

Line a cupcake pan with 12 cupcake liners. Set aside.

Place oats in a blender and grind until fine.

Add ground oats, sugar, cacao, baking powder and salt in a medium bowl. Whisk well. Add the mashed banana, oil, milk, apple cider vinegar and vanilla. Continue to whisk until smooth.

Divide batter among the 12 cupcake liners and bake for 20-25 minutes or until they start to firm on the top. Let cool completely before frosting.

Frosting Instructions:

Add icing sugar, cream, peppermint extract and green food coloring, if using, to a medium sized mixing bowl. Use electric mixer to blend until smooth. Add more cream, a little at a time as you’re mixing to create the consistency you want.

Gluten-Free-Chocolate-CupcakesAfter you have frosted the little cakes, arrange on a dessert plate, and serve with milk, coffee, or your favorite dessert beverage.

If you like gluten-free recipes, you will also enjoy Gluten Free Tropical Carrot Cake.

 

What Others are saying About Cupcakes:

Gluten-Free Tropical Carrot Cake

Gluten free Tropical Carrot Cake - Dessert Bread and CupcakesGluten is a vital protein to wheat. But many people without knowing it are allergic to it.

Those who are bothered by gluten can suffer from digestive problems, skin problems, and even depression, too name a few.

There are alternative flours that do not contain gluten, and if you make them a part of your diet, they could help to improve your health.

Gluten-free Tropical Carrot Cake

flours used for Gluten Free Tropical Carrot CakeFirst preheat the oven to 350 degrees.

As shown in the image above, mix the potato starch and both flours in a large bowl with the following ingredients. mixed dry ingredients for Gluten free Tropical Carrot CakeThere is no need to sift the dry ingredients. When mixed together set bowl aside:

1/2 tsp powdered ginger root

1 tsp sea salt

2 tsp ground cinnamon

2 tsp baking soda

1 tsp Xanthan Gum

Xanthan gum can be a little spendy so you can substitute it for any starch, like arrow root, corn, or tapioca.

The xanthan gum or any one of these starches are needed to replace the gluten. The starch or xanthan gum holds the flours together.


The Use Of Xanthan Gum In Gluten-free Baking Explain Here – Gluten Free Zucchini Cranberry Bread


coating a glass baking pan with butter and sugarNext, coat a 7 x 4 inch glass baking pan with butter and sugar, set aside.

mixing wet ingredients for Gluten Free Tropical Carrot CakeNext, in a large bowl mix together eggs, sugars, oil, yogurt and vanilla. Add flour mixture slowly until just blended. With a large spatula, stir in carrots, pineapple, coconut, and nuts.

Pour batter into baking pan ½ inch from top. Any extra batter can be used to make cupcakes (it should make 7).

Bake 45-50 minutes or until toothpick inserted in center of cake comes out clean. Bake cupcakes for 15 to 20 minutes. Cool on wire rack. Remove cake from pan.

Gluten free Tropical Carrot Cake - Dessert Bread and Cupcakes

For the frosting combine 1/3 cup cream cheese, 2 cups powdered sugar, 2 tablespoons almond milk and 1 teaspoon vanilla extract. Beat together until smooth. Frost cake when completely cooled.

Save aside a small amount of frosting and mix half  with food grade orange coloring and the other half with food grade green coloring.

Add frosting to a cake piper and pipe onto cake to form carrots and leaves with respective colors.

Gluten Free Tropical Carrot Cake - plattedWhen ready to enjoy your gluten free dessert bread, plate and serve.

 

What Others are Saying About Gluten free Balking or Cooking:

Wheat Free Alternative Grains

Wheat Free Alternative Grains and Other Plant Sources

Wheat Free Alternative GrainsWheat is one of the world’s most commonly consumed grains.

It comes from a type of grass called Triticum that is grown in numerous varieties worldwide.

Common wheat, the wheat used to make bread, is related to grains which include durum, spelt, emmer, einkorn, and Khorasan wheat.

For some individuals, wheat can trigger a harmful immune response as is it contains a protein called gluten.

What Is Gluten

Gluten is a family of proteins found in grains, including wheat, rye, spelt, and barley.

Of the gluten-containing grains, wheat is by far the most common.

The two main proteins in gluten are glutenin and gliadin. Gliadin is responsible for most of the adverse health effects of gluten (Source: National Center for Biotechnology Information).

If you are one of the individuals who is bothered by gluten, you will be happy to know there are gluten-free or wheat free alternatives.

If you have already taken on the wheat-free lifestyle, you may have discovered the wide variety of wheat free grains to choose from.

Each with its unique flavor and baking properties.

All of the following alternatives to wheat are healthy swaps in your favorite breads, pastas and side dish recipes.

Wheat Free Alternative Grains

Quinoa

Quinoa is a nutritious grain from Peru. It is a versatile ingredient, besides being used as an Quinoa wheat free alternative

alternative flour used in muffins, pancakes and bread, it can be prepared as a hot cereal, added to soups or use as a salad topping.

Quinoa contains all the essential amino acids, making it a complete protein source.

It also contains manganese, phosphorus, copper, folate, iron, magnesium and zinc.

Quinoa’s texture is crunchy and has a nutty flavor.

Flax seed

Flax seed wheat free alternative

This seed has a nutty flavor. They need to be fresh ground to get the most nutritional value from them.

Though they can be toasted whole first than ground for later use, but with less nutritional value.

Ground golden flax seedGolden flaxseeds are lighter in color and have a milder or more neutral flavor, while the brown flaxseeds have more of a nutty flavor.

They can be added to salads, cereal and when baking bread.

Buckwheat

Buckwheat flour wheat free alternative Though it may sound like it, buckwheat is not a member of the wheat family and it isn’t technically a grain, but it’s often used in place of grains.

It’s a good alternative for those with wheat allergies.

Diets rich in buckwheat seem to promote lower cholesterol and lower blood pressure (National Library of Medicine).

The most common or traditional use of this flour is making Buckwheat Pancakes.

Amaranth

Amaranth flour Amaranth is a broad-leafed, bushy plant that grows about six feet tall. It has brightly colored flowers that can contain up to 60,000 seeds. The seeds are nutritious and are ground into flour.

Not a true grain, amaranth is often called a pseudo-grain, which are seeds but have grain-like characteristics.

Amaranth belongs to the plant family that includes beets, chard, spinach among other eatable sources.

Oats

Oat flour is another great wheat alternative. Oat flour has a good amount of protein and fiber, plus a tender texture and mild taste. It can be use it in recipes that include pancakes, protein bars, and cookies.

When using oats as an alternative to wheat, be sure to select gluten-free oats.

These are specially-selected varieties that have eliminated the cross-contamination with wheat, barley and rye.

More Wheat Free Alternatives

Almond flour wheat free alternative There is also Almond flour, which is versatile and easy to work with.

Use almond flour in place of breadcrumbs for breading fish or meat. You can also swap it for white flour in baked goods such as brownies.

Coconut flour wheat free alternative Coconut flour though is not good flour to use entirely by itself, as it bakes very differently from white flour and other flour substitutes.

Coconut flour absorbs a lot of moisture and yields a denser, heavier texture out come.

It requires more eggs or wet ingredients to perform.

This flour alternative is ideal for quick breads with lots of wet ingredients, such as banana bread.

There is also chickpea flour (made from beans), as well as tiff flour and millet flour among many others.

Storing Your Gluten-free Flour

Alternative wheat flours are not cheap, so you want to make sure you store them correctly.

It is best to them in the freezer to prevent them from going rancid.

You can store the flours in their original packaging, or in freezer safe containers.

Each alternative flour has its own unique flavor and can be used in many different ways to add variety to your cooking and baking.

Try These Gluten-free or wheat free alternative recipes –

  1. Gluten Free Iron Skillet Pecan Coconut Cake
  1. Gluten Free Blueberry Lemon Bread
  2. Gluten Free Carrot Cake with a Cream Cheese Frosting
  3. Gluten Free Creamy Pesto Fettuccine
  4. Gluten Free Penne with Smoked Bacon and Butternut Squash

Read More Here:

National Gluten Free Baking Week

What Others are Saying About Wheat Free Alternatives:

Enjoying Flourless Baking

Enjoying Flourless Baking

At the end of our featured article there is a recipe: Simple Almond Cookies (baked without flour)

Many people have gone flourless for specific health reasons. Some do so because they the gluten in flour aggravates other medical conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis or asthma. Others believe avoiding flour can help them feel better.

Celiac disease is one of the main reasons for going flourless. It is one of the most common autoimmune diseases. In fact, in the last 50 years, one in 133 people have been diagnosed with the disease. Another reason for eliminating flour in your baking is to reduce carbohydrates. White flour is high in carbs, though 100% whole wheat flour has less.

Removing flour from your diet can improve your health. Going with an all-natural diet like the Paleo Diet, can help free the body from chronic diseases such as:

  • Obesity
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Type II diabetes
  • Cancer
  • Autoimmune diseases (multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn’s, ulcerative colitis, etc.)
  • Osteoporosis
  • Acne
  • Myopia (nearsightedness), macular degeneration, glaucoma
  • Varicose veins
  • Hemorrhoids
  • Diverticulosis, gastric reflux
  • Gout

Other reasons to go flourless could be due to an allergy to wheat or gluten. You may want a more natural diet that reduces many diseases and health problems. Maybe you just want to reduce the amount of carbs you take in every day. Going flourless may be very beneficial and just what the doctor ordered.

Tips for Flourless Baking

Flourless baking can be a real trial-and-error process. Flour, when used in baking, adds body, structure, texture and flavor to baked goods. It often acts as a binder, attaching ingredients together. When you remove the flour, you have to add something else in its place that will perform the same function.

Here are some tips to help achieve better baking results when going flourless.

  1. To increase the nutrition value, substitute up to 1/4 cup ground flaxseeds plus 1/4 cup water for 1/4 cup flour in a recipe (flax will absorb more moisture).
  1.  To add more moisture to your recipe, add gelatin, extra egg or oil. Honey or rice malt syrup helps retain moisture.
  1. Substitute brown sugar for white for more moisture.
  1. To enhance the flavor of flourless foods, add chocolate chips, dried fruits or nuts and double the amount of spices called for.
  1. For better structure, add dry milk solids or cottage cheese to the recipe. Replace evaporated milk for regular milk.
  1. Add extra egg or egg whites if your recipe is too crumbly.
  1. Don’t overbeat since the kneading time is shorter with no gluten to develop.
  1. You can use ground oats in place of flour, but you need ingredients like banana or eggs to bind the ingredients together.
  1. Eggs can replace many functions of gluten such as binding enhancing texture setting the structure of the recipe. Two other starch-based products you can use to bind and thicken are guar gum and xanthan gum. They are interchangeable and used in small amounts.

The key to flourless baking is to experiment. You may have to try different ingredients or amounts to get the flavor and texture you want.

 

simple almond cookies

Image Credit: Recipe.com

Simple Almond Cookies

Makes 32 cookies

 

Nonstick cooking spray, optional

2 1/4 cups whole almonds

3/4 cup sugar

2 egg whites (video included, showing a simple way to separate whites from yolks)

1 teaspoon almond extract or vanilla

32 almond slices (2 tablespoons)

2 ounces bittersweet chocolate, melted

 

Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit.

Spray two large cookie sheets with cooking spray or line with parchment paper (best choice). Set aside.

Finely grind whole almonds and sugar in food processor.

Add egg whites and almond extract and process until mixed well.

Shape a large measuring teaspoonful of mixture into crescent shapes or balls. Arrange 1 inch apart on cookie sheet. Top with an almond slice.

Bake for 10 to 12 minutes or until just brown on the top

Cool on wire racks.

When cool, drizzle tops of cookies with melted chocolate.

 

See our article: Healthy White Flour Substitutes 

 

What Others are Saying About Baking without Flour:

Healthy White Flour Substitutes

Healthy White Flour Substitutes

These days everyone, will almost everyone is concerned about their diet. One way to improve your diet is by pinpointing appropriate healthy substitutions to use in foods you love.

One of the biggest misconceptions in our society’s diet is based upon the nutrition values of white flour. It is used in all types of recipes, breads, baking and gravies.

White flour is high in carbs, has less nutrition than whole grain products, very fattening and harder for the body to digest. By using healthier flour choices you can avoid this unnecessary mess you are inadvertently creating for your body to handle.

The following are a few substitutions to white flour you can consider next time you are baking or cooking!

Whole Wheat Flour

Whole wheat flour is a healthier choice than white and can be used as a substitute in baking and cooking.

Check out our recipe using whole wheat flour and oat bran: Pumpkin Muffins with Pecan Streusel Topping 

Almond Flour

blanched almond flour This is a great option for people following a gluten-free diet. Its density and ability to rise can make it a perfect substitute for most baked goods. It also has a fraction of carbohydrates as compared to white flour.

Ideal for pancakes, muffins or cookies, this substitute could be what you have always been looking for in regards to a healthy alternative to white flour.

The natural almond flavor helps to add sweetness to your recipe. This is something unique to almond flour and a great food to keep in your pantry. Furthermore, if used in large quantity the flour can act like a cake batter and create a light cake like consistency for you to work with.

Check out our recipe that uses almond flour: Orange Almond Cake

Barley Flour           

This type of flour is an exceptional food for use in baking breads. Barley is rich in fiber and zinc and can be mixed together with other flours. Barley is also ideal for thickening gravies and sweetening sauces.

A little added trick is to lightly toast the flour before use to accentuate the hidden flavors that barley flour secretly has. Also, if used in the right way, it can add a little sweetness to your recipe as well.

Keep in mind that barley flour is not gluten free, but still makes a great wheat flour substitute for baking.

The following white flour substitutes are gluten free flours.

Buckwheat Flour

Despite the name, buckwheat flour is gluten free and wheat free. This makes it a good option for whole wheat substitutes. The thing that you need to watch out for in this product is its dense qualities and strong flavor.

This means it is great for use in products, such as, pancakes or pastas but you cannot use it as a thickener for a sauce because it will be too rich. Its earthy flavor can be good at times, but, can also overpower any good recipe, so try combining buckwheat with white flour in recipes.

Chickpea (Garbanzo) Flour

Chickpea (Garbanzo) Flour

Image Credit: Nuts.com

When it comes to gluten free substitutes, this is a common go to for vegans and those with Celiac disease.

This flour is high in protein and calcium which allows you to balance out your diet. Its uses are abundant, including, for crepes, flat bread or hummus.

Check out our recipe that uses Garbanzo flour: Gluten Free Zucchini Cranberry Bread

Oat Flour

This is probably your classic and most dependable option when it comes to healthy flour substitutes. Oat flour is all natural and helps to create a whole what product.

Depending on which company processes it, this product can be gluten-free or low-gluten. It is optimal for use in cookie and other baked goods recipes.

In summary, these are all great options for you to use as a substitute to white flour but it is important to remember that gluten-free doesn’t necessarily mean healthy.

Unless you have Celiac disease, your body can naturally handle a bit of gluten on a regular basis, but, you should focus on the whole wheat and nutritional aspects of your diet if you are going to begin substituting for white flour. Remember, the key to being healthy is balance.

 

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Green Hamburgers

Green HamburgersHere’s a great way to get your finicky eaters to eat their greens, with Green Hamburgers. One hamburger has one serving of leafy greens. As a side note, this is a great nutritional meal for those who suffer with Schizophrenia.

Now for our featured recipe: Green Hamburgers, and here is what you will need.

ingredients for Green Hamburgers

23 fresh spinach leaves

1 pkg. (about 12 oz.) basil, fresh or live basil with roots

¼ cup cilantro

1 lb. ground hamburger (15% Fat)

4 tbsp. prepared bread crumbs

 

wahs and trim greens

Cut the root ball from fresh basil and trim stems along with the spinach and cilantro. Wash the greens.

processing greens for Green HamburgersPlace all greens into a food processor with 1/8 to 1/4 cup of water, if necessary. Process greens until finely chopped and looks like a wet paste. Set aside.

cutting equal parts of hamburger meat

Divide hamburger into 4 equal parts, about 1/4 pound per each burger.

prepared Green HamurgersIndividually prepare each 1/4 pound of meat in a small bowl. Add meat with 2 tablespoons of processed greens, and one tablespoon of bread crumbs. Mix with hands and form a patty.cooking Green HamburgersBBQ, broil  of pan fry your Green Hamburgers. We used our Nu-wave oven to cook the hamburgers, about 6 minutes each side flipping 2 to 3 times. Meat must be 160 degrees internal temperature to be done.Green Hamburger sliced in halfIt is not necessary to slice burger in half. We did so to show you how the hamburger looks once cooked.preparing the hamburger with tomato and spring lettuce mixPrepare your Green Hamburger the way you like it. I personally like to use whole wheat bread slices with mayonnaise ,tomato, and a spring lettuce mix.close up of prepared Green Hamburgers

Enjoy!!

 

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