BBQ Chicken & Roasted Garlic Black Bean Tostadas

A tostada (Spanish meaning Toasted) is the name given to various Mexican dishes and other parts of Latin America.

The tostada, when broken into bite size pieces, can be consumed with a dip, like guacamole or salsa.

Corn tortillas are typically used for tostadas though you can also use flour tortillas.


Learn From A Native Mexican How To Make Flour Tortillas – Read More: Tastes of Mexico with Pico de Gallo and Flour Tortillas


Toppings for tostadas are mostly the same as those used for tacos.

The ingredients include cooked chicken, pork, or beef, and including cheese, sour cream, chopped lettuce, onions, radishes, and salsa.


Try This Peach and Mango Salsa With Your Next Mexican Meal


Tostadas unlike chalupas, enchiladas or tacos, are not folded or rolled, but are kept flat.

There are numerous variations of tostada recipes throughout Mexico and Latin America.

And because the tostada can’t not make a claim to only one traditional tostada recipe, the following is a tostada recipe in addition to several hundred other variations.

BBQ Chicken & Roasted Garlic Black Bean Tostadas

This recipe serves 2 plates – Increase Ingredients Accordingly

Meat and Tortillas

1 large chicken breast, cooked, shredded

1/2 cup BBQ sauce, your favorite

4 corn tortillas

1 cup avocado oil, refined for high heat use


Read More Here About The Smoke Point of Oils


Black beans

1 tablespoon olive oil

1 15 oz. can black beans, drained, rinsed

5 cloves garlic, roasted, minced

1/4 cup heavy cream

1 teaspoon Himalayan salt

Topping For Tostadas

2 green onions, finely chopped

1/4 cup cilantro, finely chopped

4 mini-peppers, roasted, skin removed, deseed, finely chopped

1/2 cup sour cream

Cook large chicken breast and shred, add to a large bowl. Next add bbq sauce and mix well. Set aside.

Next add to a small bowl prepared vegetables and roasted peppers. Add salt to taste, mix well. Set aside.

In a large skillet over medium heat add olive oil and heat.

Next add garlic and sauté for two minutes. Next add drained and rinsed black beans with heavy cream and salt to taste.

Using a potato masher, mash beans with cream and garlic until mix is no loner black but a light brown color. Remove from heat and set aside.

Next add avocado oil to a large sauce pan and heat.

When oil is hot, fry tortillas individually (one at a time) both sides, turning 2-3 times. Set aside on a paper towel lined plate.


Cook’s Notes

Before frying the tortillas, make sure oil is hot. If not hot enough tortillas will soak up oil. The hotter the oil, the less time the tortilla has to be in the oil.


Assembling Tostadas

Divide and spread the refried black beans, shredded bbq chicken, sour cream, and topping (in that order) among the four fried tortillas.

Plate and serve.

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More Deliciously Yummy Recipes

Chorizo Potato Tacos

Chorizo Potato Tacos with Cilantro Tomato  Lime Salsa

The contribution of the taco to the culinary world starts with Mexico and the Aztec corn fields.

Though the Aztecs did not enjoy tacos as we know them today, they did though, invent the corn tortilla.

The Tacos Origin

The taco as we know it today likely came from the Mexican men who mined silver in Mexico in the 19th century. The tacos were referred to as “miner’s tacos.”

Mexican Men Mining Silver

By 1905 Mexican migrants came to the United States to work in the mines and on the railroads. And as they ate tacos working the silver mines of Mexico, so they did as well in the U.S.

According to history, the first recipe for tacos appeared in California cookbooks in 1914.

The Taco Today

The taco gained more fame with Glen Bells – Taco Bell (fast food restaurant) which first opened in 1962.

Today, there’s no one “authentic” take on the Mexican taco.

There are several different ways to prepare a taco.

Such as tacos barbacoa (shredded beef), carne asada (grilled steak), carnitas (diced pork), pescado (fish, usually tilapia) chorizo (Mexican style sausage – usually pork), and al pastor (split-grilled pork).

If You Like Tacos – Then You Love The Deliciousness Of

Tacos al Pastor

Chorizo Potato Tacos

2 medium red-skinned potatoes, cut into 1-inch chunks

2 tablespoons vegetable oil

Freshly ground pepper

8 ounces fresh Mexican chorizo

2 medium tomatoes, diced

1 scallion (green onion), minced

1 jalapeno pepper, deseeded and vain removed, minced

1/3 cup fresh cilantro, chopped

1 teaspoon lime juice

salt

8 corn tortillas

1/4 cup crumbled cotija or Queso fresco

Sour cream and/or guacamole, for serving (optional)

Combine the tomatoes, scallion, jalapeno and cilantro and lime juice in a bowl and season with salt. Set aside.

Heat the vegetable oil in a medium skillet over high heat, then add the diced potatoes and cook until browned, about 3 to 4 minutes.

Next add the sausage to the skillet and cook, 5 to 6 minutes. While cooking mix meat with potatoes.

Remove cooked chorizo and potatoes from heat and set aside.

Warm the tortillas in a dry skillet or wrap in a damp towel and warm in the microwave, about 1 minute.

Fill the warmed tortillas with chorizo mixture and top with the salsa and cheese.

Top with sour cream and/or guacamole, if desired.

If you like chorizo then you’ll enjoy the deliciousness of these recipes.

Spicy Chorizo and Bean Soup

Orecchiette with Chorizo and Chickpeas

Mexican Squash Pasta with Chorizo Meat Sauce

Beef Steak Fajitas

Beef Steak Fajitas

The featured recipe is not authentic Mexican food, but a Tex-Mex style food with Mexican ingredient influence or Mexican inspired.

Fajitas got its start in a tortilleria in Houston Texas (USA).

As legend has it, Maria Ninfa Rodriguez, better known as “Mama Ninfa Laurenzo” starting serving fajitas in her Houston restaurant called the Rio Grande Tortilla Co. in 1973.

Originally a tortilla factory, she turned it into a restaurant after her husband passed.

The very first day she sold 250 South Texas tacos. Those pre-assembled tacos al carbon later became build-your-own fajitas, which means in Spanish faja for “belt.”

It describes the cut of beef also called skirt steak and with Mama Nifa a Tex-Mex icon was born.

Steak Fajitas are the perfect blend of well seasoned steak with bell peppers and onions all wrapped in a warm tortilla.

Most restaurants serve them on a cast iron skillet set a blaze on the way to the table.

Read more here about Mexican vs. Tex-Mex: What is the Difference?.

Beef Steak Fajitas

1 teaspoon ground Mexican oregano

1 teaspoon ground red pepper

1 teaspoon ground cumin

1 teaspoon ground coriander

½ teaspoons sea salt

1 teaspoon ground black pepper

1 ½ pounds flank steak, fat trimmed

1 red bell pepper, stemmed, seeded, and thinly sliced

1 green bell pepper, stemmed, seeded, and thinly sliced

1 yellow bell pepper, stemmed, seeded, and thinly sliced

1 small white onion, thinly sliced

1 small purple onion, thinly sliced

4 tablespoons avocado oil

6-8 corn tortillas, warmed

In a small bowl mix together the first six ingredients and set aside.

Seasoned beef strips for Beef Steak Fajitas

Trim fat from flank steak and cut into 1 x 2 inch strips. Next, with ingredients from small mixing bowl, season beef strips and set aside.

Sliced peppers and onions for Beef Steak Fajitas

Next, seed peppers, and thinly slice. Next thinly slice both onions, then mix together and set aside.

steps to cook Beef Steak FajitasWith a large ceramic coated frying pan over medium heat, add avocado oil. When oil is hot add beef strips and cook on all sides, about 2 minutes.

Add, pepper onion mix, stir in and continue to cook until meat is done to your preference (145 degrees for medium…155 degrees for med-well…160 degrees for well-done).

Read our article: Keeping Your Family Safe with a Reliable Meat Thermometer.

Beef Steak Fajitas focusing on beef and corn tortilla

Plate the Beef steak Fajitas and serve with warmed corn tortillas.

 

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Mexican Huevos Divorciados

Huevos Divorciados

Mexican cuisine is a mix of indigenous Mesoamerican cooking with European, especially Spanish, elements added after the Spanish conquest of the Aztec Empire in the 16th century. The basic food ingredients remain the same, or what is native to the culture, such as corn, beans and chili peppers, but the Europeans introduced a large number of other foods, which were meat from domesticated animals (beef, pork, chicken, goat and sheep), dairy products (especially cheese) and various herbs and spices.

With the introduction of the chicken, came the egg and in turn the modern day breakfast that is called Huevos divorciados, which  is Spanish for divorced eggs. It’s a breakfast mostly found in Mexico City and features two fried eggs separated by a column of refried beans. In some homes of Mexico they will replace the beans with chilaquiles. Typically, one egg is covered in salsa roja or red salsa, while the other is covered in salsa verde or green salsa.

Here is what you will need for the featured recipe:

½ cup avocado oil – smoke point 500 degrees- (you can use vegetable oil, but is high in omega-6 which is inflammation causing to the body, olive oil has a low smoke point -350 degrees-)

2 corn tortillas

2 large eggs

¼ cup green salsa

¼ cup red salsa

½ cup pinto or black beans, cooked

step by step Huevos Devorciados

Place a small frying pan on medium high and heat oil. With a pair of cooking tongs dip tortillas one at a time to fry, but not crisp; about 1 to 1 ½ minutes. Allow oil to drip off and place onto plate. Allow tortillas to overlap each other.

Remove all but a small amount of oil from pan. Return pan to heat and crack both eggs into pan. Place lid over eggs and cook sunny side up style; about 2 to 3 minutes. Turn eggs onto tortillas, making sure egg is lying in center.

Next spoon beans over top of eggs, also centering the beans over the eggs. On one side of the beans, spoon on the red salsa. Next spoon the green salsa on the other side.

Recipe is for 1 swerving. Follow the instructions doubling ingredients to serve 2.

 

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