Cannellini White Bean Soup with Swiss Chard

Autumn has arrived the air has chilled and once again soup season is here.

The late Laurie Collin who wrote for the food column in Gourmet magazine, said, “to feel safe and warm on a cold wet night, all you really need is soup.”

What’s In A White Bean and Swiss Chard Soup

To start, this is a soup that is filling, low calorie, and nutrient-dense.

This soup has texture, that includes leafy vegetables, beans, and lean protein.

Not only is it fun to throw it all in the pot, but a diverse soup like this one can help promote satiety and keep you fuller longer.

The Flavor of Swiss Chard

Chard’s flavor is comparable to spinach, although this depends on what cooking technique is used.

Swiss chard can be bitter. Cooking tends to diminish the bitterness so that its earthy, sweet, almost beetlike flavor is more pronounced.

Swiss Chard is used in a variety of dishes and is just as versatile as spinach.

It’s used in salads, stir-fries, soups, casseroles, and dumpling recipes.

White Beans

White beans range in size and flavor with cannellini beans being the most popular to cook with.

The Cannellini bean is the largest of the white bean group and because of their traditional kidney shape, they can also be referred to as White Kidney Bean.

They are meatier than Navy or Great Northern beans, and they have a nutty, earthy flavor with tender flesh.

Because of their texture and retaining their shape after being cooked, makes them a perfect choice to use in salads, soups, stews, and chili.


Another White Bean Soup: Red Kale Cannellini Beans and Chorizo Soup


Nutritionally speaking, white beans are packed with fiber and protein and a good source of numerous micronutrients, including folate, magnesium, zinc, potassium, and vitamin B-6.

Cannellini White Bean Soup with Swiss Chard

This soup can also be made gluten-free by substituting gluten-free pasta or orzo.

2 tablespoons olive oil

1 small yellow onion, chopped (1 ½ cups)

13 ounce cooked diced chicken sausage, (cut into half-moons) or sausage of your choice

2 garlic cloves, finely chopped (1 Tbsp.)

1 teaspoon finely chopped fresh rosemary *see note below

¾ teaspoon Himalayan salt

½ teaspoon black pepper

2 15-oz. cans cannellini beans, drained and rinsed 

4 cups chicken broth

1 dried bay leaf

1/2 cup Ditalini Pasta, uncooked

3 cups packed roughly chopped Swiss chard, stems and ribs removed *see note below

Parmesan cheese, for garnishing


Recipe Notes

* You may substitute fresh Rosemary for either thyme, tarragon or savory.

* Save Chard stems to use as part of a omelet filling – Like this one: Red Swiss Chard & Asparagus Omelette


Heat oil in a Large pot over medium-high. Add onion. Cook, stirring occasionally, until softened and translucent, 5 to 7 minutes.

Add garlic, rosemary, salt, and pepper. Cook, stirring constantly, 1 minute. Add beans, broth, and bay leaf.

Bring mixture to a boil over high. Reduce heat to a low simmer, stirring occasionally, 15 minutes. Remove and discard bay leaf.

Stir in chard. Cook, stirring often, until wilted and slightly softened, 2 to 3 minutes. Garnish with Parmesan.

Food Parts That Are Still Surprisingly Useful

Food Parts That Are Still Surprisingly Useful

Don’t toss the food scrapes just yet! You can still use them to make or prepare something you may never given any thought too.

Watermelon Rinds

Watermelon rind has nutritional benefits. It contain vitamin-C and vitamin B-6, both great for skin, immunity, and the nervous system. Here’s something that maybe a surprise to you the rinds may help your sex life. A 2008 study at Texas A&M University research reported that watermelon rinds have high concentrations of a compound called citrulline, which the body converts into an amino acid that helps improve circulation and relax blood vessels.

After cutting up a watermelon save those rinds and blend them into a fruit smoothie, or try using them in a stir-fry. The rinds when cooked have a zucchini-like texture, with a slightly sweeter flavor.

Banana Peels

A 2013 study found that around 40 million tons of banana peels are thrown in the trash and go unused worldwide. Did you know you can use the peels to heal wounds, just rub the pulp side on bruises and scrapes to deliver potassium to heal the wound.  Soak the peels in a jar of water, for a few days, then mix five parts water to one part banana-water, and fertilize your potted plants .

The Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology (2011) wrote that banana peels contain carotenoids and polyphenols, which are thought to help prevent diabetes, heart disease, and cancer.

Wash the peel in water then blend into a fruit smoothie. India boasts a dry vegetable curry using chopped banana peels boiled with turmeric powder and salt, then mixed with other ingredients, such as mustard seeds, green chilies, and cabbage.

Sweet Potato Peelings

After peeling a sweet potato, use the peels help lighten those persistent dark circles under the eyes. Even some have used the peels as a remedy to fad away freckles and age spots o the skin. It’s the enzyme called catecholase in the potatoes that give the peelings of the sweet potato this ability.

Stale Bread

Stale bread has always been used to make crumbs or croutons But did you can know you can run stale bread through your spice or coffee grinders to remove any leftover odors or residue?

If you have smudges or marks on the walls, including crayon marks, stale bread can help. First remove the crust, then wipe the marks or smudges with a soft cloth, then rub semi-stale bread against it. The sponge like texture will work like a store bought cleaning eraser.

Onion Skin‘s

The wrapping around onions is rich in the nutrient quercetin, a plant pigment that helps to prevent your arteries from clogging, and helping with lowering blood sugar, and reducing inflammation.

A 2011 study reported that in the European Union alone, around 500,000 tons of onion skins go to waist each year. Though the onion skin is not palatable, you can reap the health benefits by tossing the onion skins into beef, chicken or vegetable broth while cooking soups and stews. The out come will be a rich, flavorful soup. Don’t for get to remove the skin before serving.

Olive Oil

Do you have a bottle of olive oil that has lost its fragrant taste? Will don’t toss it. There are still ways to use it.

Do you have a pair of paints that has a zipper that just won’t budge? Dab some oilve oil on the teeth of the zipper to make it zip again. You can even use it to wipe off eye makeup. Surprised? Just try it and see for yourself.

Other uses include rubbing into the leaves of potted plants to make them shine and look healthier, or even use to polish your leather shoes.

Swiss Chard Stalks

Those of us that use Swiss chard, always toss the stalks, but wait, German researchers reported that the stalks contain glutamine an amino acid , which boosts the immune system, and can also aid the body to recover from surgery and heal wounds.

Cut the stalks into one-inch cubes, roast for about 20 minutes, and season with lemon juice, chopped garlic, salt, and pepper. Add a whole Swiss chard (stalks included) to the blender for a powerful boost to your green juice or smoothie.

If none of the for gone ideas sound appealing to you, you can toss those scrapes into a mulch bend to add to the soil in your garden. Even if you don’t garden, give your scrapes off to a friend who does, or to your local community garden.

 

What Others Are Reading About:

Orange Chicken Salad

Orange Chicken Salad

Salad usually comes before the main course. But you rather waste no time and prefer to eat the leafy greens at the same time with the main course dish. Here at Splendid Recipes and More, we feel the same way, and that’s way we have Salads as a Main Course. It is categorized rightly so, because it has leafy greens and includes a meat together on the same plate. Check out more of our Salads as a Main Course by linking here.

Making a meal in this way saves time, because you serve the salad and meat at the same time. Also Salads as a Main Course packs some protein, so you’ll leave the table feeling full.

Chicken breast in our opinion is one of the best top protein foods! 4 ounces (100 grams) of cooked chicken breast has about 23.5 grams of protein. It also contains minerals like magnesium, and potassium. Including vitamins-A, K, B-3, and B-6. It is simple to use cooked chicken breast cold for salads, and for hot meals. It is a meat that is easily digested.

Our featured recipe is Orange Chicken Salad, and here is what you will need.

1 pound large chicken breasts (about 3) skinless, boneless

1 cups orange marmalade jam

1/4 cup balsamic vinegar

2 tablespoons soy sauce

3/4 tsp. crushed red pepper, optional

16 ounces of mix greens: Spinach, Arugula, and Chard

Preheat your oven to 350 degrees.

Cut and sliced chcickne breast meat for Orange Chicken Salad

Cut chicken into 2 to 3 inch pieces, and slice each piece in half  vertically.

prepaing sauce for Orange Chicken Salad

Using a medium sauce pan over medium-high heat, add jam, vinegar, soy sauce, and crushed red pepper. Mix all ingredients together and bring to a small simmering boil.

preparing sauce and chicken breast to cook for Orange Chicken Salad

Next add sauce to a large mixing bowl, and toss in chicken pieces. Mix together until chicken is well coated. Then pour into a baking pan. Use a spatula to scrape sides of bowl, getting  every last drop of sauce. Put in heated oven for 30 minutes or until meat is done, turning meat once.

Remove, and allow to cool about 5 or 10 minutes. Spoon the sauce into a large salad bowl (the sauce is your salad dressing). Next add greens, and mix until greens are well coated.

Orange Chicken Salad close-up

Plate the leafy greens and top with cooked orange chicken. Spoon 1 or 2 teaspoons of marmalade in center. Serve and enjoy!!

 

What Others are Saying About Chicken Salad:

Almond Coconut Breaded Chicken with Peaches

Almond Coconut Breaded Chicken with Peaches

Those that read Splendid Recipes and More may have noticed our favorite way of using chicken is in salads, and therefore Salad as a Main Course. We bought some Herb Blend salad greens, which are a mix of red and green Romaine, red and green Oak leaf, Lollo Rosa, and Tango. Those are the different lettuce leafs. The herbs included all organic: red and green Chard, Mizum, baby Spinach, Arugula, Frisbee, Radicchio, Parsley, Dill, and Cilantro.

Wow that’s a lot of green and red leafy greens with lots of flavor. Did you know Swiss chard contains fiber and syringic acid, both of which help to regulate blood sugar levels. Its great to the health of your skeletal system, as it contains calcium, magnesium, and vitamin-K.

It has cancer preventative properties because of the fiber, chlorophyll, phytochemicals, and other plant pigments it contains. Studies have found that leafy green vegetables are particularly beneficial against colon cancer.

This leafy green is high in iron, essential for maintaining the health of the circulatory system and the prevention of anemia. The vitamin-K it contains helps with blood clotting and prevents excessive bruising and bleeding.

Research has reported that 30 mcg per day of biotin is great for the health of your hair and one cup of Swiss chard contains about 10.5 mcg. Swiss chard is also high vitamin-C and vitamin-A, both of which assist the hair follicles in the production of sebum.

One cup of Swiss chard contains 9,276 mcg of lutein, an antioxidant that is essential for eye health. It is suggested we consume 6,000 to 10,000 mcg of lutein for excellent eye health and preventing eye degenerating diseases.

The last herb green mentioned is Tango. It is full of vitamin-A, C, and folates. It also has vitamin-k which plays a role in Alzheimer’s disease patients by limiting neuronal damage in the brain. So if your worried about getting this age related disease, just do the tango with the Tango green leaf herb.

This is what you need for the – Almond Coconut Breaded Chicken with Peaches -.

almond and coconut flour

Mix the two flours in a medium to large mixing bowl and set aside. Depending on the number of person’s you are serving, you will need 2 to 4 skinless, boneless chicken breasts.

Cut each breast in half, then slice vertically into three slices, and cut each slice diagonally into three pieces.

breading chicken fillets for Almond Coconut Breaded Chicken Salad with Peaches

Now throw some flour out onto a cutting surface, and bread the fillets on both sides liberally.

frying breaded chicken in coconut oil

Place the breaded chicken into a large heated pan with 3 to 4 tablespoons of coconut oil. Cook until done, about 4 to 5 minutes on each side. Pieces should cook to a golden brown. Plate and set aside.

Herb Salad Mix with avocado oil and lemon

To a salad bowl add 1/4 cup avocado oil, juice of 1/2 of a lemon, 1/4 teaspoon of Himalayan salt, and 1 teaspoon of dried basil. If you want you could add 2 to 3 tablespoons of wild honey. Next add the mixed greens, about 4 to 5 handfuls. Mix greens with avocado oil and seasoning until the greens are well coated. Adding the oil, lemon juice, and other seasonings to the bowl first, and then the greens last will assure an even coating.

Do this with any salad you make. If you add the greens first, then the nuts, dried cranberries, and grated or chucked cheese, and add the dressing last, it will not coat evenly and the nuts, cheese, and cranberries will always seem to not mix in evenly, with some mixed in and others at the bottom of the bowl.

Always add your dressing or vinaigrette, nuts, cheeses, cranberries and the like first, then the leafy greens last, so when mixed together everything is evenly mixed in the salad bowl.

Hiamalya Salt

You note we mentioned to use Himalayan salt, we posted an image so you can see the difference in regular table salt and rock salt in its original form when ground. In the image you can see darker specks, which are trace minerals apart from the salt. These trace minerals are vital to your diet and your health.

 

Almond Coconut Breaded Chicken with Peaches‏

Plate the herb greens, top with some breaded chicken and some peach slices. We used fresh frozen peaches, when thawed they have the same flavor as a fresh peach. Fresh peaches though, when in season are a better choice. Enjoy!!

 

What Others are Saying About Salad Greens: