Add Cilantro Ginger Turmeric To Recipes For Frequently Less Pain

Add Cilantro  Ginger Turmeric To Recipes For Frequently  Less Pain

Inflammation is your body’s natural defense against dangers illness from bacteria, viruses, irritants, toxins and physical trauma.

Body wide chronic inflammation has shown in studies to play a principal role in the development of conditions like rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis, inflammatory bowel disease, dermatitis (eczema), rosacea, psoriasis among many others.

There are natural ways to mitigate the pain induced by chronic inflammation.

And this natural source is eating the right foods on a daily basis that can give more frequent days with less pain or no pain at all.

Doctors are increasingly embracing the idea that the food we eat may be as good as any disease-fighting, immunity-boosting drug.

These foods include:

Cilantro

Cilantro has been proven in research studies to target inflammatory pathways in the body and significantly reduce inflammation.

Cilantro leaves are rich in vitamins, including vitamins A, C and K.

The volatile oils found in the leaves and its seeds are high in flavonoid antioxidants, including kaempferol, terpinene, tocopherols (vitamin E), and quercetin.

They are also rich in phenolic acids.

These antioxidant compounds in cilantro have been found to all be associated with reducing inflammation and have neuroprotective effects.

Eat more cilantro. Start by making these recipes (click on image to get recipe).

Ginger

International Journal of Preventive Medicine published that ginger has the potential for treating a number of ailments including degenerative disorders, like arthritis and rheumatism, among others.

Ginger has shown in studies as well to work as an antioxidant by preventing the production of proteins known as cytokines, which signal inflammatory immune responses.

Ginger also can help reduce inflammation as a result of its high levels of gingerols.

Eat more ginger by starting with these recipes. Just click the image for recipe you wish to try.

Turmeric

With an earthy aroma and a deep orange-yellow color, turmeric powder is a staple of Indian cuisine.

Curcumin the main active ingredient in turmeric is a potent antioxidant with significant anti-inflammatory properties.

A study published by the National Library Of Medicine suggest that curcuminoids or curcumin could help reduce symptoms of osteoarthritis, the painful condition caused by the breakdown of the cartilage cushion between joints.

Biophysicist Ajay Goel says of turmeric, “It’s probably, to the best of my knowledge, the most potent naturally occurring anti-inflammatory.”

The National Institutes of Health states that research on the chemical compound is “limited,” but the institute acknowledges that turmeric “may help with certain digestive disorders and arthritis.”

Turmeric is a common ingredient in most curry recipes. Click the images below to find the curry recipes this site offers.

Fresh Black Pepper

Piperine is responsible for black pepper’s rich flavor and helps inhibit drug metabolism.

For example, the liver gets rid of foreign substances by making them water-soluble so that they can be excreted, and piperine can inhibit this process so that curcumin is not excreted. This explains how piperine can help to make curcumin more bioavailable.

This also includes cilantro and ginger.

When including cilantro, ginger and turmeric in your recipes, be sure to grind fresh pepper corns over the plated food before serving.

The active piperine is in the pepper corns outer skin and is released when skin is broken. But the oil does become inactive or oxidizes within about 10 minutes.

So it is important to use fresh ground pepper corns to receive the nutritional benefits of cilantro, ginger and turmeric.

Another way to increase the bioavailability of cilantro, ginger or turmerics anti-inflammatory compounds is to consume this with a source of fat, such as avocado, nut butters and nuts, fish, coconut or olive oils.

Consuming these foods with fresh ground black pepper or a source of fat will help their health benefits directly be absorbed into the blood stream.

How To Spice Things Up When Cooking

Large collection of metal bowls full of herbs and spices -How To Spice Things Up When CookingHerbs and spices are used to enhance the flavor of food, either it be for cooking Spaghetti Carbonara or baking an apple pie.

An herb or spice can be a seed, fruit, root, bark, berry, bud or leafy part of the plant. They are principally used for flavoring food among other uses. They can be used fresh or dried.

Herbs And Spices Through The Ages

It is said that by the Middle Ages, the most common spices and herbs being traded and used were black pepper, cinnamon (including the alternative cassia), cumin, nutmeg, ginger and cloves.

Herbs and spices are useful for many things, among others are medicinal uses, cosmetic or perfume production uses, and of course they are used add flavor to a meal.

By 1000 B.C. medical systems based upon herbs were found in China, Korea, and India. Also the Egyptians used herbs and spices for their embalming practices and their demand for exotic herbs and spices helped stimulate world trade.

Extracting A Spices Flavor

The flavor of an herb or spice is derived by exposing the volatile oil compounds of the seed or leafy part, that oxidize or evaporate when it comes in contact with air.

As an example, fresh ginger is usually more flavorful than its dried form, but fresh spices are more expensive and have a much shorter shelf life.

Flavor of herbs and spices can be maximized by storing them whole and grinding when needed, as grinding greatly increases its surface area and so increases the rates of oxidation and evaporation.

If you decide to use dried spices, be sure to use them within 6 to 8 months of purchase. Ground spices are better stored away from light, as it also increases the oxidation of the volatile oils.

metal bowls filled with spices

How To Use Herbs And Spices

When using herbs and spices you’ll want to pick flavors that complement each other, such as the spice mix known as “pumpkin pie spice.”

The ratios of cinnamon, cloves and nutmeg add great flavor to the pie, and each spice doesn’t over power the other.

The key or rule of thumb to spicing things up is that less is more. Avoid adding too much all at once. Instead, add a little at a time and add more to taste.

A good example of over spicing and unable to fix it, is when you use oregano or cloves. Their volital oils are great for flavoring culinary and pastry dishes, but they are strong in flavor, and only require a small amount.

When using spices to flavor your meat or vegetables, use only 3 different types at a time.

You can even use herbs and spice to replace salt. Choose your spice or spices, add a little lemon juice and unsalted butter.

Which spices pair well together for the best culinary dishes you can make?

Let’s examine some of the most commonly used spices and which spices pair well with them. LINK HERE

Pork – That’s What’s For Breakfast Lunch And Dinner

Pork - That's What's For Breakfast Lunch And DinnerThe Washington Post wrote an article in October of 2014 about the Tudor Place that housed 6 generations from 1816 to 1983.

Tudor Place became one of the first 70 U.S. properties designated a “National Historic Landmark” in 1960, when the designation was created.

Tudor Place

Image Credit: City Profile

Tudor Place in Georgetown Heights (Washington D.C.) was built by Martha Washington’s granddaughter, Martha Curtis Peter and her husband.

Residents of Tudor Place had a small smoke-house that all 6 generations relied on to smoke their meats.

Can you guess what meat they smoked most often, and ate for breakfast, lunch, and dinner? If you guessed “Pork,” you guessed correctly.

When touring the residence, you are able to see displayed, a cookbook that served 6 generations providing the kitchen cooks with recipes that only included pork as the main ingredient.

The Washington Post wrote stating that communications officer for Tudor Place, Mandy Katz says that pork was on the dinning table 3 times a day.

Smokehouse at Tuder Place

Preservation Manager Jessica Zullinger and staff tour newly restored Smokehouse – Image Credit: tuderplace.org

The small smoke-house we made mention of was never on the tour of Tudor Place. But it was renovated and became part of the tour on the 23rd of October 2014.

The newly added structure to the Tudor Place tour was celebrated with, yes you guessed – pork. Little smokies and pulled pork sliders to be exact.

This year, 2016 is Tudor Place Bicentennial. You can read and learn more about Tudor Place by linking here: Tudor Place – America’s Story Lives Here.

Our featured recipes include pork, and they are…

  1. Smoked Bacon Golden Beets and Kale Hash
  2. Orange Ginger Pork Meatball Soup
  3. Stuffed And Bacon Wrapped Pork Loin Chops with Brown Sugar And Spice Glazed Carrots

Smoked Bacon Golden Beets and Kale HashSmoked Bacon Golden Beets and Kale Hash

2 strips of smoked bacon per serving, cut into 1-inch slices

1 medium golden beet, shredded

1/2 cup kale, remove leafy parts from steam, leaves torn bite size

Heat a frying pan over medium heat. Add bacon and cook until just done. Next add beets, stir in, and cook 1 minute more. Add kale and stir in just until wilted. Plate and serve.

Orange Ginger Pork Meatball Soup

1 lb. ground pork

2 green onions

Orange Ginger Pork Meatball Soup3 clove garlic, minced

1 piece (1-inch) peeled fresh ginger, finely chopped

4-5 teaspoons of orange zest

4 cups vegetable broth

8 oz. snow peas, cut into thirds at an angle

1 cup of cooked brown rice

1 cup cooked black beans

Arrange oven rack 6 inches from broiler heat source. Preheat broiler on high. Line large rimmed baking sheet with foil.

In a medium bowl, combine pork, green onions, garlic, ginger, orange zest, and 1/2 teaspoon each of Himalayan salt and fresh ground pepper (both optional). Form pork mixture into bite-size meatballs (about 1 inch each).  Arrange in a single layer on prepared baking sheet. Broil 5 to 7 minutes, or until browned.

Meanwhile, in covered 5-quart sauce pot, heat broth to simmering on high. Once the broth is simmering, add snow peas, rice, beans and cooked meatballs. Reduce heat to medium, and simmer 5 minutes, or until meatballs are cooked through and snow peas are tender.

Stuffed And Bacon Wrapped Pork Loin Chops With Brown Sugar And Spice Glazed Carrots

1 teaspoon dried rosemary, crushed

Stuffed and Bacon Wrapped Pork Loin Chops with Brown Sugar and Spice Glazed Carrots1 teaspoon dried thyme

3/4 teaspoon dried minced garlic

1/4 cup butter, milted

1/4 cup brown sugar, packed

1 teaspoon Himalayan salt (optional)

1/4 teaspoon black pepper (optional)

1 pound pork loin chops, thin cut

8 slices smoked bacon

8 ounces cream cheese, room temperature

1 pound carrots, sliced down the middle and cut into 2 inch slices

Heat oven to 400 degrees

Mix sugar and spices in a small bowl and set aside.

Spread some cream cheese on one side of chops. Sprinkle on some sugar-spice mix. Roll chops and wrap with one slice of bacon. Use a tooth pick or two to hold in place.

Arrange prepared chops into a 13 X 9 inch glass baking dish.

Next add melted butter to sugar-spice mix, and incorporate.  Add cut carrots to a 13 X 9 glass baking dish and mix in sugar-spice.

Roast both prepared baking dishes for 30 minutes, or until pork is cook.

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Red Kale Beets and Sweet Cilantro Vinaigrette

Red Kale Beets and Sweet Cilantro Vinaigrette

Your diet has a large impact on nitric oxide (N-O) production. Beets, spinach, kale and any leafy greens are rich in nitrates. As you chew these foods the good bacteria in your saliva converts the nitrates into nitrites. Once in the stomach, the digestion continues acting on the nitrites and converts them to nitric oxide, among other compounds.

The antioxidants contained in these vegetables react with the nitrogen dioxide produced by the digestion process, scavenging the oxygen molecule, to reduce it to still more nitric oxide. Once completely digested, the N-O is then absorbed through the intestinal tract and pasted into the bloodstream.

Why should all of this be of interest to you? Because nitric oxide circulates through your body helping to keep it alive.  Your heart uses it to keep pumping vital nutrients and oxygen throughout your body.

N-O is also produced in the lining of our arteries, but as we age the body does not produce as much nitric oxide. Studies show as you complete your 4th decade of life, your body is only making about half, if not less then half of what it made when you were 20.

That is why it is important to eat a variety of nitric oxide containing plants, and our featured recipe fits the bill.

Our featured recipe is: Red Kale Beets and Sweet Cilantro Vinaigrette, and here is what you will need.

Sweet Cilantro Lime VinaigretteWe’ll start with the vinaigrette. 

1 cup packed cilantro

1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil

1/4 cup lime juice ( 1 small lime)

1/4 cup orange juice

1/2 teaspoon Himalayan salt (or sea salt)

1/2 teaspoon black pepper

Pinch of minced garlic or 1/8 teaspoon of powered garlic

2 – 3 teaspoons of coconut sugar (optional)

Place all ingredients into a blender or food processor, and blend or process until smooth.

Place into a jar with a tighten lid, and store in the refrigerator for up to 10 days.

For the salad you will need:

2 cups red kale, about 3 steams

1/3 cup beets, steam, and diced ( 1 small beet or 3 baby beets)

2 -3 tablespoons pine nuts

3 – 4 tablespoons goat cheese

Remove leaf parts of kale from steams and wash under fresh cool water. Next cut kale into smaller bite sizes portions with a pare of kitchen shears and arrange on a dinner plate.

You have the option to use canned beets (preferably organic grown), dicing the sliced beets into 1/2 inch squares. If you chose to use fresh beets, slice the beets, about 1 inch slices, and place into a steamer, until slightly soft. Remove, and cool a bit, and dice into 1/2 inch squares, making a 3rd of a cup. Arrange the beets over the kale.

Next add the pine nuts and goat cheese. Drizzle with Sweet Cilantro Lime Vinaigrette, and enjoy with slices of olive bread (we used an olive bread made with olive oil and black olives, no canola oil) or your favorite bread .

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Quick and Easy BBQ Recipes The Whole Family Will Love

Quick and Easy BBQ Recipes The Whole Family Will Love

Quick and Easy BBQ Recipes The Whole Family Will Love

Just hearing the word barbecue can make one think of a social gathering about to take place, either in your backyard, in the mountains, at the beach, at a friends place, or at the park. Where there is a barbecue, there is always food served.

friends make barbecueBarbecuing is most always outdoors, and either in the late afternoon or evening, and most of the time on a Saturday or Sunday afternoon.

Have you ever wondered about the term BBQ or barbecued? Well, this term is used in two ways, as an adjective that refers to this method of  cooking the food, and secondly used as a verb for the act of cooking the food.

Barbecuing food is cooked either using wood chips, charcoal, or propane gas, and there are many different regional variations depending where you are at in the world.

History Of Barbecuing

Most literature on the history of barbecuing points to Haiti as the origin. Some historians on barbecuing write that when the Spaniards who arrived after Columbus (who landed in North America in 1492) a few years later, found the Haitian people roasting animal meat over a raised wooden framework. The fire was built underneath, and the flames and smoke would rise and envelop the meat.

It is also written that Spanish explorers, Gonzalo Fernández De Oviedo y Valdés, were the first to use the word “barbecoa” in print in Spain in 1526. Barbecoa is the Spanish word for Barbecue in English.

As we noted earlier, barbecuing is used as a verb, and the Oxford English Dictionary cites the first recorded use of the word in the English language as a verb in 1661.

BBQ as a Sport

Barbecuing really isn’t a sport, but it is has permeated all of society and is a tradition in much of the world. There are BBQ competitions held yearsly, and almost all competition grillers use charcoal, most often in large, custom designed brick or steel grills.

Barbecue competitions are held in just about every state in the United States during the warmer months, from April through September. These competitive events feature competitions between teams of cooks and are divided into separate competitions, best BBQ pork, beef, chicken, and including the best barbecue sauces.

Here at Splendid Recipes and More, we are not competitive when it comes to barbecuing, we are just happy that the method was ever invited.

Here are some very simple and easy recipes for barbecuing beef and chicken.

The first one is -Mediterranean BBQ Chicken

basting and BBQ the chicken

To a small boil add about 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil and about 1/8 cup Mirin (a sweet rice cooking wine).

To the bowl add:

1/2 teaspoon himalayan salt

1 teaspoon dried minced garlic

1 teaspoon Italian seasoning

1 teaspoon dried oregano leaves

Mix spices, mirin, and oil until well incorporated.

Place 1 pound of chicken breasts (about 4) onto a heated foil prepared barbecue (your choice to use wood chips, charcoal or propane).

Next bast each chicken breast with spice mixture, turn breasts and bast the other side. Turn chicken about every 6 to 8 minutes so meat cooks evenly. No need to bast continuously, as the foil protects the meat juices and spices from falling through the grill.

foil tented vegetables on a barbecue

We also have a foil tent of mixed vegetables (you can use what ever type of vegetable you like), this is a great way to utilize the heat from the barbeque without using your kitchen stove top, and possibly warming the house up on a hot day.

mixing in spices and oil

We added about 2 or 3 tablespoons of avocado oil with 1 teaspoon of garlic lemon seasoning, that we purchased at the Whole Foods Market. Cook vegetables until done.

vegetables are being kept warm while meat finishes barbecuing

If the vegetables do finish before the meat is cooked, just leave them in their foiled tent and place them into a cover dish to keep them warm.

Mediterranean BBQ Chicken and a side of Garlic Lemon Vegetables

When everything is cooked and ready to eat…

Plated Mediterranean BBQ Chicken and a side of Garlic Lemon Vegetables and a salad

just plate and enjoy.

Now for our second simple and easy barbecue recipe – BBQ Beef and Sweet Pepper Fajitas –

meat and sweet peppers prepared

Prepare 1 or 2 pounds of carne para asar or carne asada, as it is called in Spanish. It is thin (very thin, less than 1/4 inch thick) cuts of sirloin, which can be found in most meat markets or the meat section of your favorit market to shop for food. Prepare the meat by cutting away any fat, and cutting meat into 1 and half inch long strips by about 1 inch wide. Seed about 7 or 8 sweet mini peppers (use yellow, orange, and red), cut them into strips about 1/2 inch wide.

spices that can be used for making fajitas

Now for the seasoning we had two choices in our spice cupboard. A Mayan Coffee Rub, and a Caribbean Rub, both purchased at the whole foods Market. We used the Caribbean Rub, and how fitting considering the history of barbequing started in Haiti, which is in the Caribbean.

Place 1 tablespoon of Caribbean rub spices into a large mixing bowl with 1/4 cup avocado oil, and a small amount of balsamic vinegar (about 1/2 teaspoon). Mix the liquids and spices together.

adding meat and peppers to oil spice mix

Next add the meat and sweet peppers and mix till well coated. Let set, and fire up the barbeque. Line a piece of tin foil to fit your grill.

Barbecuing Beef strips and Sweet Peppers

When the barbeque is heated, add the meat mixture and cook until done, turning about every 5 or 8 minutes.

BBQ Beef and Sweet Pepper Fajitas

When the meat mix is cooked remove to a platter and serve.

juices of cooked meat and peppers

Because we foil lined the grill, look at the juices that did not trip through. After placing cooked meat mixture onto a platter, pour those juices over the -BBQ Beef and Sweet Pepper Fajitas –

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Roasted Root Vegetables with Brussels sprouts and Bacon

Roasted Root Vegetables with Brussels sprouts and Bacon

Roasting vegetables helps to draw out the natural sugars and creates a crispy outside and a tender inside.

Some vegetables need a little cooking to break down enzymes that would otherwise prevent our digestive system from obtaining the vegetables nutrients, like Brussels sprouts among many others.

Other vegetables do just fine eating them raw, though when cooked, they are more flavorful, like carrots, and sweet potatoes among others.

Talking about potatoes, baby potatoes are great for roasting because they are not as starchy, and they can even add some color to a roasted vegetable dish.

It is better to either roast or steam the vegetables. Cooking them in water should only be done for 3 minutes or less, so as not to kill any nutrients.

Even though vegetables are roasted in a 350 to 400 degree oven for about 35 minutes depending on the vegetables being used, the micro-nutrients are never fully destroyed as the internal temperature of the vegetable reaches only about 150 to 165 degrees.

Adding dried herbs like rosemary that has a pine lemony flavor, also has a concentrated flavor and will not burn while roasting.

Where as fresh herbs would burn in a 350 to a 400 degree oven.

Be careful with oregano though, as it has a pungent earthy flavor, and can be over powering if to much is added.

Keep in mind that adding salt to meat or vegetables while being cooked can make them tough, but not so when using salt in its natural form, such as Himalayan salt or sea salt.

These two salts do not only have sodium, but also other trace minerals naturally found in salt rock mines, or ocean salt.

Roasted Root Vegetables with Brussels sprouts and Bacon

1/3 cup organic EV olive oil

3 medium organic rainbow carrots, sliced

1 1/2 cups organic Brussels sprouts, halved

1 1/2 cups organic trio baby potatoes

1 medium organic sweet potato, cut into

1.5 inch slices

1 medium parsnip, cut into 1.5 slices

1 tablespoon dried oregano

1 tablespoon dried rosemary

1 teaspoon dried thyme

1 teaspoon dried basil

1/4 teaspoon Himalayan salt

1/2 pound thick cut bacon, cut strips into 1 inch pieces

___________________________

Preheat oven to 400 degrees

Place vegetables into a large bowl and mix with herbs and oil.

Spread out vegetables into a 13 X 9 inch glass baking dish. Place dish on middle rack in oven and roast for 35 to 40 minutes.

Meanwhile fry bacon in a large pan over low heat. Do not let bacon get crispy.

In a large serving bowl add and mix roasted vegetables and bacon with a little bacon drippings.

Serve as a side dish or as a main dish as it contains meat (if doing so add 1 pound of bacon).

 

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Preparing a Natural All Organic Meal

Preparing a Natural All Organic Meal - header image

Many recipes humans have prepared for generations, have withstood the test of time, and not simple because the ingredients taste good together, but are enjoyed because they are more nutritious together than they are on their own.

Many who know basics of cooking have learned the spices and herbs that go well with certain foods to complement their flavors, making the dish more desirable and palatable.

The first private cooking school to open in the United States was in 1877 and was named the Boston Cooking School. The most notable was the creation of The Culinary Institute of America in 1946. Culinary schools educate future culinary professionals, teaching them the theory behind cooking, baking, and why certain foods go well together over others.

In this article we want to present the preparation of a natural all organic meal, using flavorings that are not traditionally used in preparing a meal, that includes a leafy green or side dishes and including a meat.

Garlic and Thyme Mashed PotatoesLet’s start to the right of the plated food with the Garlic and Thyme Mashed Potatoes, and here is what you will need.

1½ pounds medium red or Yukon Gold potatoes (3 or 4)

½ cup milk, use full fat milk

2 cloves garlic, smashed

3 tablespoons unsalted butter

¾ tablespoon dried thyme

1 teaspoon Himalayan salt

⅛ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil

Peel potatoes and cut them in half. Place them in a medium saucepan and cover with cold water to 2 inches above potatoes. Bring to a boil then lower the heat to medium and simmer until the potatoes are very tender and can be easily pierced with a fork, about 18 to 22 minutes.

Meanwhile, peel and mash the garlic, set aside.

milk-butter mix for - Garlic and Thyme Mashed PotatoesAdd the milk, salt, butter, thyme, and garlic to a medium sauce pan over medium heat, and bring to a soft boil. Turn heat off and let sit until the potatoes are cooled.

cooling potatoes for - Garlic and Thyme Mashed PotatoesWhen the potatoes are cooked, place a colander in the sink and drain the potatoes, do not rinse. Let them sit for about 10 to 15 minutes.

Return them to the same saucepan, and mash them, then add the liquid and mash in till well incorporated.

If needed, add a little more milk for a creamier consistency.

Now, let’s look at the center bottom of the plate in the header image and we will not the Orange Ginger and Rainbow Carrot’s. The simple ingredients used in this dish make it worth preparing. Here is what you will need.

Orange Ginger and Rainbow Carrot's1 bunch of rainbow carrots, washed and sliced

1/8 cup ginger syrup (can be purchased at your local health food store, such as Whole Foods Market, or Natural Grocers)

1 1/2 tablespoons orange zest

Cook carrots in a steamer until just tender. Remove and place into a vegetable serving bowl and add ginger syrup and orange zest and mix in.

 

 

Chopped Kale with Drizzled Maple SyrupNow let’s look to the upper left side of the plate and we will see the Chopped Kale with Drizzled Maple Syrup. This is what you will need.

1 bunch of kale, washed and leaves trimmed from steams

1/8 cup of extra-virgin olive oil

1/8 cup of real maple syrup

Chop leaves and set aside. To start add 1/8 cup each of the olive oil and syrup to the bottom of a salad bowl.

Add chopped greens and toss. After tossing, fork some greens to see if the oil and syrup ratio fit your needs, it not add a little more oil and syrup till it is just right.

At the top of the plate sits some thin cut boneless pork chops, that were rubbed with a Mayan Coffee Rub, that we purchased at the Whole foods Market. The rub also includes Mayan chocolate and other spices. Rub both sides of the chops, and let sit for about 30 minutes.

Place a large ceramic coated frying pan over medium-low heat, add 4 to 5 tablespoons of Irish Butter (or any butter churned from grass fed cow’s). Let melt, and when warmed add chops and slow cook, turn chops every 5 minutes, and cook till the internal meat temperature is 160 degrees.

Preparing a Natural All Organic Meal - footer image

Plate your food and enjoy. Remember, all of the ingredients used were all organic natural foods. With the natural flavors, not only will your palate  thank you, but so will your health.

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Fennel and Spinach Salad with Shrimp and Balsamic Mustard Vinaigrette

Fennel and Spinach Salad with Shrimp and Balsamic Mustard Vinaigrette

Mustard has a sharp, hot, pungent flavor. Over time though, the heat of prepared mustard can dissipate, because of the chemical compounds coming in contact with oxygen after they have been crushed.

As a prepared condiment, mustard could contain ingredients like salt, sour vinegar, and sweet flavors. Turmeric is most often added mainly to give mustard its yellow color.

Because of its antibacterial properties, mustard will not grow mold, mildew, or harmful bacteria. Mustard can last indefinitely without becoming inedible or harmful, though it may dry out, lose its flavor, or turn brown from oxidation. Just stir in a tiny amount of wine or vinegar to help improve dried out mustard.

Dijon style mustard with the addition of wine, was first developed in Dijon, France.

Now for our featured recipe:

Fennel and Spinach Salad with Shrimp and Balsamic Mustard Vinaigrette

3 slices center-cut bacon

1 pound jumbo shrimp, peeled and de-veined (recommended not to use farm grown shrimp, as it contains more cholesterol, than its wild caught counter part)

2 cups thinly sliced fennel bulb (about 1 medium bulb)

1 cup grape tomatoes, halved (when making this in the summer, you can use Symphony Cherry Tomatoes, as they come in a variety of colors)

½ cup thinly sliced red onion

1 (9-ounce) package fresh baby spinach

2 tablespoons finely chopped shallots

3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar (we like to use infused balsamic vinegar, our favorite is balsamic infused with pomegranate)

1 teaspoon Dijon mustard (if possible get the Dijon that has some whole seeds, and you will get a sharp, hot, pungent flavor to your salad)

1/4 teaspoon Himalayan salt (better than regular table salt. It contains all of the trace minerals, so you use less salt)

1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper, optional

Cook the bacon in a medium skillet over medium heat until crisp. Remove bacon from pan, reserving the drippings, and crumble the bacon., and set aside.

Fennel and Spinach Salad with Shrimp and Balsamic Mustard Vinaigrette -close upNow add the prepared shrimp to the pan, and cook about 2 to 3 minutes on each size. Remove from pan and set aside.

In a large bowl, combine the bacon, fennel, grape tomatoes, red onion, and baby spinach.

Combine the remaining ingredients at the bottom of a large salad bowl, stirring with a whisk.

Now add the bacon, fennel, grape tomatoes, red onion, baby spinach, and shrimp. Toss the ingredients until well coated with the balsamic mustard vinaigrette toss.

Plate and serve.

 

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Mushroom Tortellini with Asparagus

Mushroom Tortellini with Asparagus

The medical journal, “American Medical Association” publish  in 2010 based on a study that found vitamin B-6 when combined with folate ( not folac acid, the inferior form, a synthetic form) and methionine ( an amino acid, also found in meat, chicken, fish, eggs, garlic, onions, legums, and some dairy) can reduce the chances of lung cancer by as much as two-thirds.

Asparagus contains both of these vitamins, and including the amino acid methionine.

More great news of the vegetable asparagus is it contains saponins which helps to fight inflammation, and can help with arthritis and rheumatism. 

It can also help to prevent varicose veins. Ayurvedic medicine has used asparagus for century’s to treat the symptoms of menopause as well as infertility and loss of libido (in both men and women).

The featured recipe also includes vitamins and minerals like vitamin-A, vitamin-C, calcium, and iron. It also has 18% of your daily need of protein 9 grams (daily protein need is 25 grams for woman and 30 grams for men).

Mushroom Tortellini with Asparagus

1 package cheese tortellini

Pint of cream

¼ cup grated Asiago cheese

5 – 7 asparagus stalks

1 4 oz. can mushrooms

1 cup baby spinach

1/2 tsp. black pepper

Asparagus being blanched - Mushroom Tortellini with AsparagusBring a pot of water to boiling. Separately prepare a bowl of cold water with some ice.

Add salt to the boiling water and blanch the asparagus for 2 – 3 minutes until they just start to become tender.

Remove and add asparagus to the cold water to stop the cooking and set the color.

Remove to a paper towel to drain and dice into ½ inch pieces. You could do this ahead of time and keep the prepare asparagus in the refrigerator.

Next bring a pot of water to boil and the Tortellini according to package instructions.

While cooking the pasta, heat a large sauté pot over medium heat and add 3/4 of the cream. While the cream is heating continue to stir and allow it to slow reduce, scrap sides of pot if needed.

When the cream has reduced by about 1/3 lower the heat and simmer, about 3 to 4 minutes.

Next add the asiago cheese to the cream, and turn the heat to high, stir in till cheese is melted. Add mushrooms and black pepper, and stir in.

Tortellini should be done now, so quickly drain and add to the cream along with the asparagus and toss to combine.

Place spinach on top of mixture and place a lid over pot, and allow spinach to wilt, about 4 minutes.

If you see the cream sauce to thick and would like it a bit thinner, just add a little more cream a tablespoon at a time till you see the thinness you desire.

Plate paste and garnish with cheese, if desired.

A great addition to this recipe would be roasted pine nuts.


If this recipe with Tortellini sounds delicious, then you’ll love preparing Baked Cheese Tortellini with Bacon Vegetables & A Rosemary Alfredo Sauce.

 

Healthy Ways To Cook Chicken With Marinades

chicken breast - Healthy Ways To Cook Chicken with Marinades

Did you know the average American eats 55 pounds of chicken per year? That’s about 27 chickens each.

raw chicken breast- chicken breast - Healthy Ways To Cook Chicken with Marinades According to Whole Foods Market, chicken is rated as a very good source of protein, providing 67.6% of the daily value for protein in 4 ounces. Protein can be important in reducing bone loss in older people.

One scientific study on the subject showed that men and women from 70 to 90 years old who had the highest protein intake lost significantly less bone over a four-year period than those who consumed less protein.

Animal protein, as well as overall protein intake, was shown to be associated with preserving bone mass in our bodies.

Chicken is also an excellent source of niacin, the cancer-protective B-vitamin, and is also a very good source of the trace mineral, selenium.

Selenium helps with the function of the thyroid hormone metabolism, antioxidant defense systems, and immune function.

Protein is also needed for our bodies to build and repair muscle.

Marinating Your Chicken

Marinating can add flavor, and makes the meat more moist and tender without adding a lot of fat.

Chicken that is marinated for a longer period of time is more tender as the juices of the marinade have become fully absorbed into the chicken.

Remember to always throw away the left over marinade that has soaked the chicken to avoid salmonella poisoning.

Use skinless chicken breasts as these are the lowest in fat and calories.

The skin increases fat by about 20%. You can cook with the skin, but, removing it before eating is recommended.

Read more here about marinating meat: What are the Benefits of Marinating Meat

Healthy Cooking Methods for Chicken

Grilling

grilling chicken - Healthy Ways To Cook Chicken with Marinades Grilling is the best method of cooking chicken; this includes, a BBQ grill or indoors in the oven broiler.

A squeeze of lemon, a sprinkling of black pepper and paprika will make your chicken a delicious meal you will enjoy.

Boiling

Most people think that boiling chicken will make it tasteless; on the contrary it will be tender and fall off the bone on your plate.

The secret is in the amount of the water used to cook the chicken.

For that reason measure adequate amount of water that will cook the chicken and allow boiling until it is almost absorbed.

Add chopped red onions and stir, do the same with tomatoes, bell peppers and some garlic. Sprinkle a bit of turmeric powder and a bit of salt and cover for a minute.

Remove and plate with a serving of vegetables and a small portion of whole grain pasta.

Baking

Make time to marinade the chicken overnight so that you can enjoy the baked outcome.

  • Place rosemary, juice of half a lime, a tablespoonful of honey, a tablespoonful of olive oil and a dash of vinegar into a bowl and mix thoroughly
  • Add into your chicken in a Ziploc bag and refrigerate
  • Spray your baking pan with Pam cooking spray and arrange the chicken
  • Bake at minimum of 375F

Add some baby potatoes around the chicken so that they absorb the juices for a complete meal and serve with a salad of steamed vegetables.

Stir Frying

Only a minimum amount of oil is needed in a wok or a cast iron skillet on the pan to prevent the chicken from sticking.

It is necessary to slice it into small pieces so that it cooks through faster.

Diced carrots, bell peppers, garlic, cabbage, sprouts, zucchini, broccoli and many other nutritious vegetables can be added to the stir fry.

Sprinkle some powdered red pepper on the chicken if you like it hot.

Steaming

Steaming food allows it to retain all its nutrients; therefore steaming your chicken with your veggies will provide a nourishing meal.

When choosing chicken for steaming, make sure that it is young so that it is not tough and rubbery when done.

Great Marinade Ideas

  • Ground mustard, minced garlic, ½ lemon juice, pinch of salt, a sprinkle of black pepper, fresh coriander, a tablespoonful of olive oil and ¼ cup cider vinegar
  • Diced red onions, rosemary, cinnamon, turmeric, one teaspoonful of sunflower oil, 2 teaspoons of honey and juice of one small lime
  • Natural Greek yogurt, low sodium soy sauce, cayenne pepper and fresh thyme
  • Low sodium soy sauce, fresh garlic and onion powder

chicken-breast-meal -Healthy Ways To Cook Chicken with Marinades Don’t hesitate to experiment with some ideas of your own. There are many great flavorful combinations that can yield a delicious and healthy chicken dish.

Also, there are many fine bottled marinades, or dry packaged seasonings that you add oil, juice, vinegar, or water that are available in stores.

Just be sure to buy all natural and no preservatives add. These can be great time saving methods to cook chicken.

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