Maple Syrup – The Same As Cane Sugar – Recipes Included

Research involving cane sugar at the University of California-San Francisco reports that sugar is essentially a toxin that causes all sorts of lifestyle diseases, including hypertension, heart disease, diabetes and even cancer.

Sugar is just about in every day foods bought. Such as bread, low-fat yogurt, soy milk, bbq sauce, tomato sauce, chocolate milk, cereals, smoothies, cookies, and muffins among many other foods.

If you were to have just one serving of each of the foods in the above image, you would have consumed about 13 tablespoons of sugar or 37 – 40 teaspoons.

That’s 30 teaspoons past the daily recommended intake by USDA of only 10 teaspoons or 3 tablespoons (The Question of Sugar – USDA).


You’ll enjoy this read – National Maple Syrup Day – is every year on December 17th.


The Alternative To Cane Sugar

There is an alternative sweetener, and what most people don’t know is that it beats out all the others.

What is the alternative? Maple syrup. Maples taste profile is even better than sugar.

Maple Syrup Flavor

Maple syrup has caramel notes along with the woodsy maple flavor that you might expect from a maple syrup product.

Maple syrup can have a complex flavor with notes of vanilla, cinnamon and even hazelnut.

Cane sugar tastes highly refined and incredibly sweet.

Maple Syrup Health Benefits

Maple syrup contains 100 essential nutritional compounds including vitamins, minerals, amino acids, phytohormones, and 67 polyphenols.

A study done by the University of Rhode Island – The College of Pharmacy, reported that maple syrup has antioxidants and minerals that deem this syrup a superfood (Study Source).

The researchers said that in their laboratory research they found several compounds that possessed anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, which have been shown to fight cancer, diabetes and bacterial illnesses.

When examining other sweeteners, real maple is higher in – magnesium, calcium, zinc, manganese, and potassium than honey, brown sugar, and white sugar.

The USDA Nutritional Database, says a 1/4 cup serving of Real Maple Syrup supplies 95% of our daily intake of manganese, 37% of riboflavin, 7% of magnesium, 6% of zinc, 5% of calcium and 5% of potassium.

The database also reports maple syrup is higher in antioxidants than cabbage, tomatoes, and cantaloupe.

Real Maple Syrup has a glycemic index of 54, and is defined as having a “medium” index.

Cane Sugar on the other hand, has a glycemic index of 68 and is defined as having a “high” index.

Honey has a glycemic index of 60 – Brown sugar has a glycemic index of 70.

If your vegan, maple syrup is an alternative to honey. It is also fat-free.

Eating and Cooking With Maple Syrup

Maple syrup can be used for more than just pancakes.

It can be used as an easy replacement for sugar in coffee, tea, and lemonade, as a homemade salad dressing, in baking, in marinades, and on roasted vegetables.

Here are a few recipes that use real Maple syrup.