Wild Salmon with Peach Mango Salsa

Wild Salmon with Peach Mango Salsa

Wild Salmon with Peach Mango Salsa with Prosciutto Wrapped Vegetables

Do you know the difference between farmed fish and wild ocean caught fish, in particularly salmon? We wanted to know the answer, so we reasearch it, and here is what we found.

Farmed fish is a $1 billion a year revenue (USA), with salmon being number one.

Farmed salmon has less area in which to grow and thrive, and their bodies are much fattier than wild salmon, and have less omega-3 fatty acids.

They are fed processed fish oil and fish meal or a high fat feed, which is not the typical food wild salmon eat.

The flesh of farmed salmon are greyish in color due to their diet. Food coloring is added after harvesting to give farmed salmon the pinkish color that wild caught salmon have naturally.

Health Problems Associated with Farmed Salmon

 fish farm cage in Norwegian SeaFish farm cage in Norwegian Sea

Farmed salmon contain more unhealthy omega-6 fatty acids, and higher lipid levels (Lipid Composition in Farmed and Wild Salmon), raising the risk of inflammation, which is  associated with heart disease, stroke, arthritis, and other health problems.

Farmed salmon are given antibiotics and in some cases growth hormones, which also gets into the water supply, and can affect other wild marian creatures.

As of 2013 AquaBounty Technologies (US based company) has received approval from the FDA (Genetically Engineered Salmon) to genetically modify farmed salmon.

The one benefit of farmed salmon is they have no mercury in their meat, as they are grown in so-called controlled waters and their lifespan is shorter than in the wild, and wild salmon live longer with higher chances of mercury exposure.

After considering the research, it appears to us here at Splendid Recipes and More, that wild caught salmon is clearly more natural and nutritious over  its farm grown counterpart.

Wild Salmon with Peach Mango Salsa

Now for our featured recipe and here is what you will need.

The recipe makes four (4) servings, so you will need four salmon filets that are de-boned. When shopping for the ingredients to make the salsa, be sure to purchase one each of red sweet pepper (bell pepper), mango, serrano chili, small lime, and one bunch of green onions (Scallions). You will also need 2 medium peaches (frozen are ok if fresh peaches are not in season).

2 medium peaches, peeled, deseeded, chopped

1 large mango, peeled, deseeded, chopped

½ cup green onions, diced (about 3 scallions)

½ red bell pepper, diced

1 Serrano pepper, deseeded and minced

½ tsp. salt

1 tbsp. sugar (we used coconut sugar)

Juice from one half of a lime

Optional: ½ cup cilantro, chopped

chopped and diced produce for Peach and Mango Salsa

Prepare peaches and mango. Place into a medium mixing bowl along with the diced onion and red bell pepper. Do not mix. Next add Serrano pepper and optional to add chopped cilantro, again, do not mix.

Peach and Mango Salsa - close-up

squeeze out lime juice with the back of a spoon Squeeze out lime juice with the back of a spoon

 Together add salt, coconut sugar and lime juice. Stir mixture until well incorporated.

Let mixture set for 15 minutes at room temperature for flavors to infuse, or refrigerate until ready to eat.

Wild Salmon with Peach Mango Salsa

Prepare salmon, by grilling, baking, or broiling. Plate your salmon and top with the salsa. The recipe for the side dish of vegetables to be posted.

Peach and Mango Salsa

The salsa can keep in a jar with a tight lid for 2-3 days in the refrigerator, or can be frozen for later use.

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Warm Brussels sprouts and Dilled Potato Salad

Warm Brussels Sprouts and Dilled Potato Salad

The high fiber that Brussels sprouts contain can lower cholesterol by binding with bile acids that the liver produces from cholesterol for digesting fat.

The vitamins and minerals found in Brussels sprouts, include vitamins C, E, and A, and the mineral manganese.

Brussels sprouts are high in vitamin-K  about 273.5% per 8 ounce. Vitamin-K promotes healthy bones, prevents calcification of body tissues, and also helps as an anti-inflammatory agent, and also essential for brain and nerve function.

Studies have shown it can ward off cancer with only 4 servings a week compared to 10 servings a day of any other vegetable that isn’t part of the family of cruciferous vegetables.

Enjoy the video.

Print a copy of the recipe 

Warm Brussels sprouts and Dilled Potato Salad   

1 lb. baby potatoes, washed, skins left on

10 oz. Brussels sprouts, sliced

6 min-sweet peppers, seeded, diced

4 tbsp. avocado oil, divided

1/3 cup almonds, slivered

1 tsp. dried dill

¼ cup balsamic vinegar infused with pomegranate

½ tsp. salt

Heat oven to 350 degrees

Wash potatoes and roast in oven 25 to 30 minutes. Set aside.

Slice Brussels sprouts and sauté in heated pan with 3 tbsp. avocado oil.

Add slivered almonds and continue to sauté for 4 to 5 minutes.

Add mixture to potatoes. Set aside.

Wash peppers and remove seeds. Dice and add to salad mixture.

Mix in 1 tsp. dry dill. Add balsamic vinegar and 1 tbsp. avocado oil and mix until well incorporated.

Next add 1/2 tsp. salt and mix in well.

Plate and serve with your favorite meat.

 Print a copy of the recipe here

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