Roasted Root Vegetables & Shrimp Salad

Roasted Root Vegetables & Shrimp Salad

This roasted root vegetable salad is not only plated with shrimp, but also mixed greens.

It is then pleasantly dressed with a mango chipotle dressing.

The salad also has some crunch with roasted pecans. Pecans taste so good in salads. Roasting them even deepens the flavor and crispness.

Three interesting fact about Pecans:

  • Pecans are the only major tree nut indigenous to America.
  • According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), scientific evidence suggests but does not prove that eating 1.5 ounces per day of most nuts, such as pecans, as part of a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol may reduce the risk of heart disease.
  • One serving of pecans (28g) has 12g of “good” monounsaturated fat and only 2g saturated fat.

Roasted Root Vegetables & Shrimp Salad

3 beets, peeled, diced, roasted

2 sweet potatoes, peeled, diced, roasted

3/4 cup pecan pieces, pan roasted

1 lb. shrimp, cooked

6 oz. goat cheese

4 cups baby Spinach

2 to 3 cups Arugula

1/2 cup Mango-Chipotle Dressing

You can either buy a bottle of Mango-Chipotle Dressing or make your own. Here is a recipe of ours you can try.

Mango Chipotle Dressing

2 Mangoes, peeled, pitted (about 1 ½ to 2 cups)

4 garlic cloves, peeled

2 Chipotle Chili Peppers in adobo, wash peppers and de-seed *

½ cup Olive Oil

¼ cup Vinegar

3 – 4 tbsp. Lemon Juice

2 tbsp. Sugar

¼ tsp. Salt

Place mango flesh, garlic gloves and peppers into a food processor and puree. Next add oil, vinegar, lemon juice and process until well incorporated, about 1 minute. Add sugar and salt; process a few seconds.

Makes about 2 ½ cups

*if too spicy, use only 1 pepper

Preheat oven to 400 degrees.

Wash, peel and dice the 3 beets and 1 to 2 sweet potatoes. If the potatoes are small use two. If the potato is medium to large than one is sufficient. 

Place the diced root vegetables into a large mixing bowl and add 1/4 cup of extract virgin olive oil.

Next sprinkle with salt and pepper. About 1/8 teaspoon each and mix until the vegetables are well coated with the oil, salt and pepper.

Line a jelly roll pan with parchment paper and even spread the vegetables over the prepared jelly roll pan.

Using a spatula to get all the oil as well. Once you have the coated vegetables spread out place into heated oven and roast for 20 to 25 minutes.

While the vegetables are roasting, heat a large pan over medium heat.  Add the pecans and roast them until they smell fragrant, about 8 to 10 minutes. Move them to a plate and set aside.

Now heat a large pan over medium high heat and melt two tablespoons of butter. Once melted sprinkle generously some ground black pepper.

Add the shrimp and cook one on side about two minutes and turn and sprinkle with a little pepper. Cook 3 to 5 minutes. Remove shrimp to a plate and set aside.

By this time the vegetables should be done roasting. Remove them from the oven and transfer to a large plate to cool.

Now that you have have your shrimp, pan roasted pecans and oven roasted vegetables to one side and cooling.

Prepare to plate the mixed leafy greens to four plates.

Once you have platted the leafy greens spoon on to each plate some roasted root vegetables, shrimp, pecans, goat cheese and mango dressing. Enjoy!

If this shrimp salad hits the spot – then you’ll love making Tortellini Primavera with Cajun Shrimp.


More Deliciously Yummy Recipes

Shrimp Ceviche

Shrimp Ceviche

Ceviche originated in Peru and is considered a national dish.

The first documentation of the word ceviche is from 1820, in the song “La Chicha,” sung by Peruvian soldiers.

According to some historic sources from Peru, ceviche originated among the Moche, a coastal civilization that began to flourish in the area of current-day northern Peru nearly 2000 years ago.

The Moche apparently used the fermented juice from the local banana passionfruit.

Recent investigations further show that during the Inca Empire, fish was marinated with chicha, an Andean fermented beverage made from purple corn.

Chicha – a Peruvian BeverageMade From Purple Corn

Different chronicles also report that along the Peruvian coast prior to the arrival of Spaniards, fish was consumed with salt and ají.

Nevertheless, most historians agree that ceviche originated during colonial times in the area of present-day Peru.

The preparation and consumption of ceviche is practically a religion in parts of Mexico, Central, and South America, and it seems as though there are as many varieties of ceviche as people who eat it.

Ceviche is easy to make and can be prepared as a meal or as a fabulous appetizer for your next dinner party.

How To Cook Ceviche

The freshest ingredients make all the difference in this classic dish of Peru.

Ceviche is made with raw fish, and yes you can use shrimp.

The normal process of cooking food is by heating it which involves denaturing, which is a culinary term referring to the changing of the structure of the proteins in the food.


You may think of cooking as purely functional – When in fact there are several reasons Why We Cook.


Another way of denaturing a protein is to apply citric acid. Citrus juice can essentially denature the protein of raw fish.

Historically it was prepared using the citrus of bitter orange. Though most recipes use lime and lemon juices.

Firm-fleshed fish can be used to make ceviche. Such as cod, halibut, flounder, sole, scallops, lobster and shrimp.


If you eat fish regularly than you love making this Oven-Baked Pecan Crusted Salmon


Typically the fish is mixed with diced onion, tomato, cucumber, jalapeños, and cilantro.

Most Latin American countries though, have given ceviche their own touch of individuality by adding their own particular garnishes.

Though you can add whatever you like. Other cooks making this dish have added diced fruits such as pineapple, mango, and avocado.


If you like mangoes , you’ll love Peach and Mango Salsa – Which you could also add some shrimp too.


Serve with tortilla chips – corn on the cob – wrapped in warm corn tortillas or lettuce wraps.

Shrimp Ceviche

2 pounds raw shrimp

1/2 cup onion, chopped

1 jalapeño (ribs and seeds removed, then minced)

3/4 cup cucumber, diced

1 cup tomatoes, seeded and diced

3/4 cup cilantro, chopped

3/4 cup lime juice

1/2 cup lemon juice

Tortilla Chips (for serving)

• Place the raw shrimp in a bowl and pour the lime and lemon juices over the shrimp. Add salt to taste. Gently toss to coat.

• Cover and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes – up to 2 hours.

• Next, remove the shrimp from juice to a dry salad bowl. Add 1/4 cup of the juice (can add more as needed)

• Next add the onion, jalapeno, cucumber, tomatoes, and cilantro to shrimp and juice. Stir to combine (add more juice if needed).

• Serve chilled with tortilla chips. Or wrap in a warm tortilla with avocado slices.


Shrimp Pad Thai

Shrimp Pad Thai

Pad Thai is a stir-fried rice noodle dish commonly served as a street food and at most restaurants in Thailand.

Street Food Vendor – Thailand

The dish is typically prepared with rice noodles, chicken, beef or tofu, peanuts, a scrambled egg, and bean sprouts, among other vegetables.

The ingredients are sautéed together in a wok, which creates even heat distribution.

Once the dish is completed it is tossed in a pad thai sauce, which gives the dish its signature tangy salty flavor with a hint of sweetness.

The History of Pad Thai

Stir-fried rice noodles were introduced to Thailand from China centuries ago.

The original name of Pad Thai is Gway Teow Pad Thai.

Gway Teow means “rice noodles in Chinese” which suggests that there are some elements of China in the dish.

Rice Noodles

But the present name tells us all about the famous dish. ‘Pad’ means ‘fried’ and ‘Thai’, means Thai style.

It is believed that a similar dish was brought to the Ayutthaya kingdom by Chinese Traders in the 1700s.

The website Expique writes that Pad thai is a relatively recent addition to Thai cuisine, and traces its origins to a period of ultra-nationalism in Thailand in the wake of the 1932 revolution.

Pad thai was listed at number five on a list of “World’s 50 most delicious foods” readers’ poll compiled by CNN TRAVEL in 2017.

Tim Cheung journalist for CCN says of the 2017 poll, “Here’s a food Thai people can’t live without. Similar to Bulgogi, pad thai is packed with nutrients stirred into one glorious fried-noodle dish.

BULGOGI – KOREAN BBQ BEEF – #22 on CNN Travel

Tim says Pad Thai’s secret is in the sauce — tamarind paste. If anyone ever creates a Hall of Food Fame, that should be first on the list.”

Tamarind Paste

Shrimp Pad Thai

10-12 ounces dried flat rice noodles (1/4-inch wide; sometimes called pad Thai or banh pho)

1/2 pound cooked medium shrimp, shelled, deveined, tail on if desired (for looks)

Medium Shrimp

3 tbsp tamarind paste

1/2 cup soy sauce

1/4 cup light brown sugar, packed

2 tbsp chili sauce (recommended: Sriracha)

4 medium shallots, minced

4 garlic cloves, minced

4-5 scallions, green and pale green parts, cut into 2-inch pieces

1/2 cup radicchio, chopped (or vegetables of choice, like kale or green and purple cabbage)

1 1/2 cups peanut oil

Lime wedges

In a small bowl add the tamarind paste, soy sauce, brown sugar, and chili sauce, sir until sugar has dissolved, set aside.

Add rice noodles to a large bowl and pour hot water over them, making all noodles are submerged in hot water.

Soak the rice noodles, according to the instructions on your package, until they are tender. Usually 4-5 minutes. When done, drain noodles and rinse with cold water. Set aside.

Next, heat a wok or frying pan over medium heat, add 2 tablespoons of oil, then swirl to coat side of pan or wok.

Stir-fry scallions, garlic, and shallots until softened, about 1 minute.

Add noodles and stir-fry for about 2 minutes.

Next add crushed peanuts, radicchio, sliced green onions, tamarind sauce and simmer, turning noodles to coat with sauce evenly, about 2 minutes.

Plate noodles and top with cooked shrimp, and chopped cilantro. Serve with lime wedges on the side.

Tortellini Primavera with Cajun Shrimp

Tortellini are ring-shaped pasta, sometimes also described as “navel shaped”, hence their alternative name – “belly button” (ombelico).

Originally from the Italian region of Emilia (in particular Bologna and Modena), they are usually stuffed with a mix of meat, which is pork loin, raw prosciutto, and Mortadella.

It also contains Parmigiano Reggiano cheese, egg and nutmeg.

The Origins of Tortellini

Legend claims that Venus and Zeus were weary after a day of worrying that they stared at a near by inn.

It is said that night the innkeeper went up to their room and peeked through the key hole to see the navel of Venus.

The site of seeing this leaves him spellbound – so much so that he immediately rushes to the kitchen and creates a pasta inspired by Venus’ navel…and so was born the Tortellini.

IS ALL OF THAT TRUE – you ask?

I don’t really know – But that’s what Barrilla (the pasta makers) write on their website – titled What Is The Origin Of Tortellini.

The Italian Tradition of Tortellini

In the land of pasta tortellini’s birth, the region near the Italian city of Bologna, they’re strictly served as broth-like dumplings.

Tortellini in Broth
Tortellini in Broth – Image Source: La Cucina Italiana

There in Bologna a tortellini has never been served as a Pasta Primavera and no less served with Cajun shrimp.

Cajun shrimp over pasta

Gianni degli Angeli is the president of the San Nicola Association, which has taken on the task of safeguarding the local region’s renowned culinary traditions.

He says the No. 1 symbol of the local gastronomic culture is the tortellino.

“In times of poverty and hardship, we ate tortellini only at Christmas, Easter and at weddings, because the filling is made of costly ingredients like prosciutto and parmesan cheese,” he says.

Tortellini are an integral part of family life in the Emilia region, says Massimo Bottura, chef and owner of a three-Michelin-star restaurant in Modena.

He says, “I grew up under the kitchen table escaping my older brothers at my grandmother’s, where flour fell on my feet”(source: NPR).

Cajun Shrimp

These spicy smoked cajun shrimp bring a lot of pizazz to the pasta dish.

Use as much or as little smoked Cajun pepper as you’d like, depending on your taste and those you cook for.

Jar  on plate with smoked Cajun  spice
Smoked Cajun Pepper Spice

The smoked Cajun pepper spice is a mix of:

• Smoked Paprika

• Black Pepper

• Chilli Flakes

• Dried Thyme

• Dried Oregano

• Garlic Powder

• Onion Powder

If the spice you are using for the shrimp is a Creole Cajun Seasoning, it would have all of the seasonings noted above, with the addition of dried parsley and basil.

Tortellini Primavera with Cajun Shrimp

1 package (20 ounces) refrigerated cheese tortellini

3/4 cup sweet peas, fresh or frozen

2 medium sized carrots cut into 1/4 inch circles

3 cups broccoli florets, stems removed

12-15 large shrimp, shell, head and guts remove

2 tbsp unsalted butter

1 tsp. smoked Cajun pepper spice

Sauce

1/2 cup unsalted butter

2 cloves of garlic, minced

1 cup of heavy cream

1 cup of finely grated Parmesan cheese

1/4 teaspoon of freshly grated nutmeg

Bring a pot of water to a boil. Cook the tortellini according to package directions. Drain and set aside.

While pasta is cooking in potted water, add 2 tablespoons of butter to a large skillet over medium heat, and let melt.

Next place shrimp over butter and sauté for about a minute then sprinkle Cajun spice over shrimp and continue to cook shrimp on both sides until pink.

Shrimp in  a frying pan

Remove skillet from heat and spoon shrimp onto a plate and set aside.

Next, wipe skillet clean and return to heat.

Add the 1/2 cup butter to warmed skillet and melt. Once butter is melted add the garlic, stir and cook until garlic is fragrant about 1 minute.

Next add heavy cream, cheese, and nutmeg and mix well.

Next add vegetables and stir in. Allow to warm about 2 or 3 minutes.

Next add pasta and mix in well.

Two options: mix shrimp with pasta and vegetables or plate pasta and top with shrimp.

Fennel and Spinach Salad with Shrimp and Balsamic Mustard Vinaigrette

Fennel and Spinach Salad with Shrimp and Balsamic Mustard Vinaigrette

Mustard has a sharp, hot, pungent flavor. Over time though, the heat of prepared mustard can dissipate, because of the chemical compounds coming in contact with oxygen after they have been crushed.

As a prepared condiment, mustard could contain ingredients like salt, sour vinegar, and sweet flavors. Turmeric is most often added mainly to give mustard its yellow color.

Because of its antibacterial properties, mustard will not grow mold, mildew, or harmful bacteria. Mustard can last indefinitely without becoming inedible or harmful, though it may dry out, lose its flavor, or turn brown from oxidation. Just stir in a tiny amount of wine or vinegar to help improve dried out mustard.

Dijon style mustard with the addition of wine, was first developed in Dijon, France.

Now for our featured recipe:

Fennel and Spinach Salad with Shrimp and Balsamic Mustard Vinaigrette

3 slices center-cut bacon

1 pound jumbo shrimp, peeled and de-veined (recommended not to use farm grown shrimp, as it contains more cholesterol, than its wild caught counter part)

2 cups thinly sliced fennel bulb (about 1 medium bulb)

1 cup grape tomatoes, halved (when making this in the summer, you can use Symphony Cherry Tomatoes, as they come in a variety of colors)

½ cup thinly sliced red onion

1 (9-ounce) package fresh baby spinach

2 tablespoons finely chopped shallots

3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar (we like to use infused balsamic vinegar, our favorite is balsamic infused with pomegranate)

1 teaspoon Dijon mustard (if possible get the Dijon that has some whole seeds, and you will get a sharp, hot, pungent flavor to your salad)

1/4 teaspoon Himalayan salt (better than regular table salt. It contains all of the trace minerals, so you use less salt)

1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper, optional

Cook the bacon in a medium skillet over medium heat until crisp. Remove bacon from pan, reserving the drippings, and crumble the bacon., and set aside.

Fennel and Spinach Salad with Shrimp and Balsamic Mustard Vinaigrette -close upNow add the prepared shrimp to the pan, and cook about 2 to 3 minutes on each size. Remove from pan and set aside.

In a large bowl, combine the bacon, fennel, grape tomatoes, red onion, and baby spinach.

Combine the remaining ingredients at the bottom of a large salad bowl, stirring with a whisk.

Now add the bacon, fennel, grape tomatoes, red onion, baby spinach, and shrimp. Toss the ingredients until well coated with the balsamic mustard vinaigrette toss.

Plate and serve.

 

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Shrimp and Snap Pea Stir-Fry

Shrimp and Snap Pea Str-Fry

Prepare a meal in a snap with this super fresh stir-fry. Stir-frying is one of the fastest ways to prepare dinner. Small cuts of food or bite sized foods cook up in no time when tossed into a hot pan.

We even went a step further with this stir-fry, we topped it with lemon zest and shavings of fresh ginger root. Ginger is great for digestion, reduces pain and inflammation, and wards off some cancers.

If you are increasing your omega-3 in your diet, shrimp is a great choice with .29 grams per a 3 ounce serving.

Our featured recipe is – Shrimp and Snap Pea Stir-Fry – and here is what you will need.

2-4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

2 cups sugar snap peas, trimmed

1 can of sliced water chestnuts, drain

12-16 ounces large shrimp, cooked

1/4 cup garlic and green onion teriyaki sauce (your favorite brand; we use Kikkoman)

2 cups cooked wild rice and red barely

1 cup organic chicken broth

cooking rise

Pour 1 cup of water and 1 cup of organic chicken broth into a medium sauce pan, add rice and bring to a boil on high heat.

Once boiling lower heat to low to simmer for 45 minutes. What we do so the rise will not be soggy after cooking it, is place a dry clean towel over mouth of pot and place the lid over the towel. As the water evaporates and rises to the lid water forms again only to fall back over the cooking rice.

With the towel in place, it will hold the vapor not allowing it to fall back over the rice. The rice is always 100% guaranteed  to be fluffy.

When rice is done remove towel, fluff with a fork and set aside.

washing snap peas

 

Meantime, wash and trim the Snap Peas and set aside. Next, open the can of water chestnuts, drain off  liquid and set aside.

preparing and stir-frying Shrimp and Snap Pea Stir-Fry

Next place a large frying pan or a wok if you have one over high heat, add 2 tablespoons of olive oil. When heated add 1/8 cup of the stir fry sauce. Place peas and chestnuts into pan and stir-fry until snap peas turn a bright green in color. Place into a medium bowel and set aside.

Using the same pan, add the shrimp and remaining 1/8 cup of stir-fry sauce. Stir-fry until shrimp is more oblique in color than orange. Add back the vegetables to shrimp and stir-fry 1 minute more. Remove from heat.

close up of Shrimp and Snap Pea Str-Fry

Spoon some rice on to a dinner plate, spoon some shrimp stir-fry over rice and serve. As we stated before hand, we topped the stir-fry with lemon zest and shavings of fresh ginger root. Enjoy the wonderful flavors of this splendid stir-fry.

 

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